Get Your Zombie on at iHeart Radio’s Monster Jam Triple Threat “Feast with the Beast”  Zombie Party at Ace Cafe Orlando

Free admission event for the public to meet Monster Jam Driver Bari Musawwir and take photos with his Zombie custom-built Speedster and ATV
WHAT:
Before the adrenaline-charged, four-wheel excitement that is Monster Jam® Triple Threat Series opens at the Amway Center, fans have a chance to meet famed Zombie driver Bari Musawwir and get up close to his customized high-powered speedster and ATV during a meet-and-greet at Ace Cafe Orlando, in partnership with iHeart Radio. Free admission, open to the public and fans of all ages are invited.
  • Little fans ages 12 and under are encouraged to sport their favorite Zombie gear and can get their faces painted like a zombie, courtesy of Hart and Huntington Tattoo artists.
  • Ocoee resident Bari Musawwir (Zombie), the first local driver to ever appear in a Monster Jam (he is also the sport’s first African American driver and won Rookie of the Year in 2012) will take photographs and sign autographs with fans.
  • Get up close to the Zombie speedster and ATV that will be used during the competition when Monster Jam Triple Threat Series opens for the first time in Orlando on Saturday, August 18th with shows at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m.
  • Flash drawing for one lucky fan plus three guests attending the event to stay for dinner with Musawwir. Must be present to win at time of drawing at 7:15 p.m.
  • The public can enjoy food and drink specials.
  • Free parking is available on-site on a first-come, first-serve basis for Ace customers.
WHEN:
Friday, August 17, 6-7:30 p.m.
WHERE:
Ace Cafe Orlando, 100 West Livingston Street, Orlando, FL 32801. On the corner of Garland Avenue and Livingston Street. Parking is also available in nearby parking garages. Click here for a map.
ADDITIONAL INFO:
For event updates, connect with Ace Cafe at 407.996.MOTO (6686) or acecafeusa.com, and on FacebookTwitter @AceCafeOrlando and Instagram @acecafeorlando_official.
#AceCafeOrlando #SeeYouAtTheAce
For more information on Monster Jam, please log onto www.MonsterJam.com (click on “Tickets” and search for Orlando) or follow us via our social channels below:
About Feld Entertainment
Feld Entertainment® is the worldwide leader in producing and presenting live touring family entertainment experiences that uplift the human spirit and bring people together. Properties include Monster Jam®, Monster Energy Supercross, AMSOIL Arenacross, Disney On Ice, Disney Live!, Sesame Street Live! and Marvel Universe LIVE! Across the brand portfolio, Feld Entertainment has entertained millions of families in more than 75 countries and on six continents. Visit feldentertainment.com for more information.
About Ace Cafe
Ace Cafe is the most famous motor-diner on the planet. Since 1938, Ace Cafe London has been a mecca for those passionate about cars, bikes and rock ’n roll culture. The original location on London’s North Circular Road began as a transport cafe for truckers, then evolved into a popular destination for rock ‘n roll-loving teens riding motorbikes during the ’50s and ’60s. Today, the Ace has a multi-generational appeal from motorsports enthusiasts from all over the world. Ace Cafe North America holds the exclusive licensee rights in North America and South America for this world-famous brand. Ace Cafe Orlando is the first North American venue for Ace Cafe. Other Ace Cafe locations around the globe include London, Lahti, Beijing, Lucerne and Barcelona. For more information, visit www.acecafeusa.com.

“Cargo” Creators Discuss Their Australian Zombie Drama

The Australian-based zombie drama Cargo was released on cinemas down under this month and is currently streaming internationally on Netflix. It follows Andy (Martin Freeman, read his interview here) a father facing down a viral plague outbreak and journeying across the Australian wild to get his baby somewhere safe. Along the way he encounters both natural and human foes and joins forces with Thoomi (Simone Landers), a young indigenous girl who saw her own father taken by the virus. The film was based on a short that debuted at Australia’s Tropfest in 2013. I sat down with directors Ben Howling and Yolanda Ramke as well as producer Kristina Ceyton (The Babadook) to discuss expanding their unique zombie take to a feature.

Lauren Damon: What made you approach a zombie film from this father-daughter angle?

Yolanda Ramke: I guess, I mean for us that really was sort of the heart of the short film— was this relationship between the father and the child. And I think we felt like with the response that the short got that that was the theme, like the vibe that was really resonating with people. So we knew that that was something that we wanted to hold on to in sort of a longer form story. And then it was just a case of you know, fleshing that out. And how do you expand that from a seven minute thing to a hundred minute thing? And then also yeah, how do you bring something kind of that you feel might at least have some element of freshness to it within that genre. For us, it was going Aussie and thinking about our culture.

LD: With such a populated genre, you know, “The Walking Dead” would have already been on a couple seasons when you made the short—do you watch other content out there or try to avoid it?

Ramke: Well I think when the short kind of came out, it was maybe the “Walking Dead” was in season 2?

Ben Howling: End of season two.

Ramke: So it was still sort of like at its zenith and it was—but yeah, we were keeping tabs definitely. I think it’s good to know what other projects are doing and just to make sure that you’re conscious of that. And pushing away from it where you can.

LD: Do any of you have small children that influenced this story at all?

Ramke: We don’t, no.
Howling:No. We have fathers though!
Ramke: We have parents!

LD: Parents who would combat zombies for you?

Ramke: [laughing] Yeah, exactly. That’s it. I think they would.

Kristina Ceyton: ‘Dad, can you carry me on your back?’
Howling: We’ve actually both got fathers who are kind of like engineers, mechanic engineer types, so I guess that kind—the ingenuity of that, we’d be fine—
Ramke: Yeah, I think we both think they probably could do something like that.

Cargo Directors Ben Howling, Yolanda Ramke and producer, Kristina Ceyton

LD: Kristina, you also produced The Bababook which had that heavy mother-son theme front and center, was this project like a funny coincidence to go to a father-daughter?

Ceyton: It is. It’s funny, like initially I didn’t make that connection at all on that level because I just gravitated to the story and you know, was really moved by it. I think it is a genre movie that is surprisingly emotional and has a lot of deep layers about exactly the, you know, parent to child dynamic…but yeah, I suppose there’s parallels, but it’s a very different beast in this instance. I think it’s a lot less psychological and this is about survival and about transcending death. And I think what you would do, you know, the length you would go to to sacrifice yourself for love and family and also community on a more broader level. Yeah. I think it’s those things that really resonated.

LD: When expanding from short to feature, what was the decision making process like on how much more to reveal about the nature of this virus? Because the short was obviously very sparse on details.

Ramke: I think we were really interested in the idea of just throwing the audience in the middle of it. And just personally because we love films that do that. And that make the audience work a little bit to kind of put things together. And I think we just also felt within this genres, we’ve seen a lot of stories that were about finding the cure or that sort of thing and we just thought, ‘well that’s been done really well by other films.’ It just didn’t interest us to go there. I think we just thought, how can we carefully deal out bread crumbs and details for people to put the world together and work out what’s going on. And then just let them go on this journey with this father and this baby and this indigenous girl.

LD: Yeah, that indigenous element is very unique to this film, did you outreach to people in those communities to get their perspective?

Howling: Yeah, in script development, we brought a script consultant on, Jon Bell—who is an indigenous writer from back home and he was able to kind of walk us through. We had some ideas which we’d researched but then we’d discuss with him—‘is this feasible? Is this practical?’ Indigenous culture is very sensitive back home because you could never make a blanket statement like ‘everyone would behave like this.’ There’s all these micro-communities that have these different cultures and values and practices. So he was able to help us navigate those waters in terms of what would be the appropriate response. And then on top of that, just with his own experience. Talking about ways that you can use indigenous hunting techniques and things like that.

Ramke: And then from there, once we knew where we were shooting, which was South Australia, it was a case of conversing with local elders in those communities as well. Just to make sure that we were sort of tailoring things to that region. And giving them the script and making sure that they were comfortable with what was happening. Seeking formal permission to use language in the film. And just trying to basically approach it as respectfully as possible.

LD: How did you go about casting Thoomi?

Ramke: She was a find. Our casting director Nikki Barrett had put a call out. So that had gone to a load of very regional communities across Australia and we had kids filming themselves on their phones, having their parents like read the lines off camera in these very monotone voices. It was just super cute. And yeah, we got down to four girls who we did sort of a workshop with and we just felt like Simone from day one was sort of the standout. And yeah, she really killed it.

LD: How did you get in touch for casting Martin Freeman? Had he seen the short?

Ceyton: No he didn’t so we approached his agent. It was just basically the traditional way of approaching his agent and the initial response was ‘I don’t think that Martin likes genre films’ [laughs] But luckily he read the script and really loved it and fell in love also with the story of this dual kind of father-daughter relationship and survival. And I think for him, it was never really a ‘genre film.’ So luckily he was available at that time and just all the pieces fell into place.

LD: Did his casting change anything within the film seeing as he is basically THE whole film?

Ramke: It would have been just very small things. I think at the point that he had come on we were in the process of doing another draft anyway. So just subconsciously as a writer once you know who the actor is going to be and you’re familiar with their work, you can kind of hear their voice a little bit. So when you’re writing dialogue, there’s an element of writing it with that person in mind. But I think also once we knew that we were going to be casting a British actor, which is something we had hoped to do from quite an early on—that also informs some of the more thematic threads of the story, in terms of Australia’s colonial history. And that just absolutely put more meat on the bones I guess.

LD: Can you talk more about Australia’s past in terms of this story?

Ramke: Absolutely. Just in terms of Australia obviously being, a long way back, colonized by the British and there were a lot of ramifications that kind of linger. In terms of social issues and Australia has some work to do, I think, in terms of acknowledging that past. And you know, it hasn’t been handled in a way that some other nations like, I believe, Canada and New Zealand, where there are treaties with their indigenous people. It’s all been quite overlooked. So I think there is still a lot of collective pain that exists in indigenous Australia. And we just didn’t want to ignore that, I suppose. But we also didn’t want to get too preachy about it either. So it was something we could just let sit in the story, just by nature of being English and coming into contact with this indigenous—

LD: And him requiring their assistance.

Ramke: That’s right. That’s sort of like the reversal of the sort of historical context, I guess in a way.

LD: How did you go about developing the other Australians in the film? The human villains, who weren’t present in the short.

Howling: I think in early drafts we just explored a variety of like different antagonists. And then we just kind of blended them together into one kind of more fleshed-out three dimensional kind of person…It was nice to have somebody as a bit of a contrast to the indigenous response which was to go back to the land and traditional ways. And this is somebody who is very attached to western living and can’t let go of it. So it was just in terms of creating that, that split between the two of them and learning his motivation and fleshing it out from there.

LD: When you make a zombie-apocalypse film like this, do you find yourself considering what you would do in this worst-case scenario?

Ramke: Ohhhh…have you ever thought about what you’d actually do?
[laughter]
Howling: That makes you cocky…
Ramke: No, but I think ultimately it would always come back to family though. It would always be about ‘Are my family safe? How do I re-connect with my family?’ and make sure that we’re together if this was to go down.
Howling: But what if they’re already infected??
Ramke: [Gasps] Oh! Well I just can’t even deal with that idea, that would be heartbreaking.

LD: Your zombies are unique in that they’ve got a different design, this orange slime rather than regular blood and gore, what was the thought behind that?

Ramke: Yeah, we didn’t want to do the gory bloody thing. And I think that that just came from this approach that we tried to take to the whole film which was to just to try and keep it as sort of grounded as we could. And as subtle as we could. And that idea of that design aesthetic coming out of the natural environment. The idea that this sort of toxicity in the environment and that it sort of literally affecting the land and that is spreading to the people. So the influence for that was like tree sap was like a visual reference. That more organic kind of reference.

LD: Are you excited that this film with be hitting the Netflix audience?

Ramke: Yeah we are!

LD: Are you guys the Netflix binge-watch types, do you have favorites?

Howling: Yeah, definitely.
Ramke: I loved “The OA”. “The OA”, “Stranger Things”, I feel like there’s some other really great shows that I’m completely neglecting!
Howling: There’s really not much that I don’t binge on.
Ramke: Yeah, you’re a really good binge-er.
Howling: “Dark”, “Requiem”.
Ramke: “Requiem’s” cool, yeah.
Howling: Just recently, actually just the other day I smashed out “Lost in Space.”

LD: Do you have personal favorite zombie or horror films?

Ramke: Shaun of the Dead is my favorite zombie film, actually. But I think in terms of reference points for this film, oh my goodness, we were looking at more sci-fi stuff. So like Children of Men, District 9 and I guess The Road as well is sort of comparable.

Howling: And also Frank Darabont’s “The Walking Dead” season one was out. That’s what really kind of like ignited us back into the zombie thing…he only did season one. That was like a six-part, it’s very different to the rest.

You can watch Cargo now on Netflix.

 

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Members of White Zombie, Queens Of The Stone Age, Primus, Ministry and More Expose Truths in New Tell-All Documentary About 90’s Alternative Rock

UNDERGROUND INC.: The Unsung Story of Alternative Rock
 
Members of White Zombie, Queens Of The Stone Age, Primus, Ministry and More Expose Truths in New Tell-All Documentary About 90’s Alternative Rock
 
Watch the Official Film Trailer Here
 
Make UNDERGROUND INC. a Reality by Supporting via Kickstarter
It was the early 90’s – seemingly out of nowhere, a little grunge band called Nirvana began outselling massive commercial artists like Michael Jackson. This immediately caught the attention of the giant record companies. These small underground bands branded as ‘alternative’ or ‘post-punk’, went from being inconsequential to being potential behemoths in record sales – and the hunt began.
 
Hungrily sweeping for the next Nirvana, a buying frenzy ensued as small indie labels were bought out by the commercial labels on a never before seen scale. A&R execs would see random alt-rock bands perform in a bar and appear after their set offering unheard of financial offers and immediate global exposure. It seemed these band members were set for life – so what happened?
 
Verity is revealed in UNDERGROUND INC.: The Unsung Story of Alternative Rock, an upcoming documentary destined to be the ultimate look at the alternative punk and metal scene in the 90’s, and a must see for serious music lovers. Told by the artists who pioneered a sonic subculture, this feature-length documentary tells the real story of the 90’s – exposing viewers to an amazing catalog of the era’s rarities and buried treasures, while re-living the struggles, triumphs and tragedies, as well as the debauchery. UNDERGROUND INC. will dig beneath the manufactured truth to explore what really happened, exploring a time unlike any other in the music industry!
 
UNDERGROUND INC. features interviews with members of seminal 90’s rock, punk and metal groups such as White Zombie, Queens Of The Stone Age, Primus, Bad Religion, Stone Sour, Clutch, Red Fang, Failure, Ministry, Quicksand, Helmet, Steve Albini, Sepultura and dozens more. Viewers are getting an in-depth, raw look at the scene from musicians who were at the forefront.
 
 
UNDERGROUND INC.‘s original music is composed by Peter Mengede (Helmet), Grammy nominated record producer Alex Newport (The Mars Volta, Bloc Party, Death Cab For Cutie) and Mark Bradridge.
 
In order to get this documentary out of the creation stages and into the homes of music lovers, the creators of UNDERGROUND INC. have launched a Kickstarter campaign. The Kickstarter campaign will run for 32 days, and the project goal is $40,000.
 

Album Review: Rob Zombie “The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser”

“The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser”
Rob Zombie
Zodiac Swan
Tracks: 12

Our Score: 1.5 out of 5 stars

Master of the macabre Rob Zombie is back with his 6th studio album titled “The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser”. As the follow up to his 2013 release “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” the new album features 12 tracks from the former White Zombie front man which blend his unique brand of 70’s tinged rock and roll with eerie b-movie samplings which seem to permeate from every crack and crevice.

With an album title like “The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser” one would hope for the music to be equally as impressive. Sadly this is not the case as the new album from Rob Zombie is an uneven blend of chaotic, multi layered samples that lack any real musical substance. Over the course of the albums twelve tracks which only clock in at a measly thirty one minutes Zombie’s once unique blend of horror infused rock comes off as stale and tiresome. Despite a few shining moments in the way of tracks like “Well Everybody’s Fucking in a U.F.O.” and “The Hideous Exhibitions of a Dedicated Gore Whore” the album seemed to be absent of any real hook or catchiness and, instead comes off as a scattered mess. Even with such an impressive band behind him consisting of bassist Piggy D, guitarist John 5 and drummer Ginger Fish there still just wasn’t enough musical appeal to warrant a second listen.

Some impressively wordy titles are about all you will find in the latest release from Rob Zombie. With a three year lapse between albums I was certainly hoping for more and, in the case of “The Electric Warlock Acid Witch Satanic Orgy Celebration Dispenser” I needed a lot more. The albums lack of focus and its brief runtime really left me unfulfilled. This is easily Zombie’s weakest release however if you’re a long time fan and want it for your collection go for it but, if you are just know checking out Rob’s work I highly recommend skipping this and going to his impressive back catalog.

Track Listing:


1.) The Last of the Demons Defeated
2.) Satanic Cyanide! The Killer Rocks On!
3.) The Life and Times of a Teenage Rock God
4.) Well Everybody’s Fucking in a U.F.O.
5.) A Hearse That Overturns with the Coffin Bursting Open
6.) The Hideous Exhibitions of a Dedicated Gore Whore
7.) Medication for the Melancholy
8.) In the Age of the Consecrated Vampire We All get High
9.) Super-Doom-Hex-Gloom, Pt. 1
10.) In the Bone Pile
11.) Get Your Boots On! That’s the End of Rock and Roll
12.) Wurdalak

 

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Concert Review: Rob Zombie “Super Monster Sex Action Tour 2015”

“Super Monster Sex Action Tour 2015”
Rob Zombie
Date: Friday, June 19th 2015
Venue: Tag’s Summer Stage, Big Flats, NY

Our Score: 4.5 out of 5 stars

The macabre entity known as Rob Zombie brought his band of merry maniacs to the Tag’s Summer Stage on June 19th as part of his “Super Monster Sex Action Tour” where he performed for a near capacity crowd. Though the front man pointed out that he was a little under the weather you would have never noticed as he and his band blasted through 17 songs which spanned not only Zombie’s solo albums but also some of his work with his previous band White Zombie. Though foreboding skies seem to loom over the head Mother Nature played nice providing a great experience for concert goers.
Flanked by longtime band members Piggy D and guitarist John 5, and basked in glowing red lights amidst a smoke filled stage the man himself Mr. Rob Zombie appeared before the anxious crowd for what would be his first ever appearance at the Tag’s Summer Stage. Not one to disappoint or waste time Zombie and company blasted through songs like “Superbeast” and “Living Dead Girl” which gave way to such classics as “More Human Than Human”, “Meet the Creeper” and the always present “Thunder Kiss ‘65”. In what appeared to be a much more scaled down stage show compared to previous tours the band which was rounded out by former Marilyn Manson drummer Ginger Fish on drums proved that they could perform equally, if not better without the various stage props and gimmicks. The band had a great mix of sound coming through the PA which captured each instruments sonic element pairing nicely with the shows red/blue/green visual elements.

Having seen Rob and his band in a number of different incarnations and venues dating back to some of his early solo performances a lot has changed however one thing seems to always remain a constant. Each time Rob Zombie takes the stage he does not disappoint and this night’s show was no different. A great sound and performance along with the perfect mixture of both new and old material making up the set list made for an enjoyable night of rock and roll.

Set List
1.) Teenage Nosferatu Pussy
2.) Super-Charger Heaven
3.) Superbeast
4.) Get Up (I Feel Like Being a Sex Machine)
5.) Living Dead Girl
6.) Dead City Radio and the New Gods of Supertown
7.) Drum Solo
8.) More Human Than Human
9.) Sick Bubble-Gum
10.) Pussy Liquor
11.) Meet the Creeper
12.) Never Gonna Stop (The Red, Red Kroovy)
13.) Blitzkrieg Bop
14.) Thunder Kiss ‘65
15.) We’re an American Band
16.) The Lords of Salem
17.) Dragula

CD Review: Rob Zombie “Spook Show International Live”

Rob Zombie
“Spook Show International Live”
T-Boy Records
Produced by: Rob Zombie
Tracks: 19

Our Score: 5 out of 5 stars

“Spook Show International Live” is the latest release from Rob Zombie and his make-up clad crew of homicidal maniacs. The first live release from Zombie in 8 years consists of 19 pounding tracks that contain enough power to wake the dead. Recorded during the “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” tour Rob and his band deliver their signature show right to your living room.

This is the way Rob Zombie should be heard! Yes all the studio versions of the songs contained on “Spook Show International Live” good in their own right but this is how they should really be heard. Each of the 19 tracks are vibrant and clear allowing the listener to experience the power of the band as if they are standing in the front row of a live show. Signature RZ tracks like “Living Dead Girl” and “Never Gonna Stop” blend in perfectly with newer tracks such as “Sick Bubblegum” and “Dead City Radio” while White Zombie classics such as “Thunderkiss ‘65” and “More Human Than Human” round out an already impressive set list along with some other really special numbers. Even the background vocals can be heard clearly through the heavy distortion and bombastic drums and bass adding to the albums appeal.

Whether you have seen Rob Zombie multiple times or never had the chance you need to get this album. Very rarely can the true essence of a live performance be captured and then transferred for personal listening however “Spook Show International Live” goes the extra mile and then some giving listeners something they can listen to time and time a again.

Track Listing:
1.) Teenage Nosferatu Pussy
2.) Superbeast
3.) Living Dead Girl
4.) Dead City Radio
5.) Drum Solo
6.) More Human Than Human
7.) Sick Bubblegum
8.) House of 1000 Corpses
9.) Meet the Creeper
10.) Never Gonna Stop
11.) Blitzkrieg Bop
12.) Thunder Kiss ‘65
13.) Jesus Frankenstein
14.) Were An American Band
15.) Dragula
16.) Demonoid Phenomenon
17.) Pussy Liquor
18.) Demon Speeding
19.) Ging Gang Gong De Do Gong De Laga Raga

 

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“Zombie Cats from Mars” Production Announcement, Trailer and First Image!

Early 2015 release planned for new horror starring Portlandia’s Ernest Adams

BURBANK, CALIFORNIA : MWB3 Problems has laid out the galactic kitty-litter for its upcoming horror-comedy Zombie Cats from Mars. Directed by Montetré (Holed Up) and written by Ryan Cloutier, the ‘catastrophe’ – which came together thanks to a successful crowd-funding campaign on Kickstarter – is due for release early this year.

Portlandia’s Ernest Adams stars alongside Jonah Kersey, Stephanie Leet, Bransen Sands Koehler, Julie Marie Howard, and Edward Kopf in fun horror romp that’s part Gremlins, part Critters.

Since it’s a movie about cats, writer and producer Cloutier furnished the support roles with furrier thesps. Marci Koski, an animal behavior specialist and volunteer with Furry Friends, supplied animal talent for the film.

The story centers on Billy, an effeminate fan of vintage science fiction action thrillers. His only friend is Cameron, a nerdy film buff who tries to boost his confidence whenever he can. After seeing a UFO land, Billy retreats into his head, imagining that aliens are taking over the town. Cameron is skeptical, as is the rest of the town. Meanwhile, people are starting to die. First, the reclusive cat lady Percis is discovered mutilated by Lester, the church -­‐going husband of Carolyn, Percis’s depressed caretaker. Random deaths soon follow, first a jogger, and then a janitor at the Carbonics Warehouse. A pair of news reporters shares this information with the public while the Detective and his Chief try to solve the killings. Meanwhile, the killings continue. Billy, wrapped up in a world of fiction, discovers a story in which Martian Cats land on Earth and inflict horror upon the town. Confident that the killings are the result of the UFO delivering alien cats, he sets off on his own superhero mission to save the town.

Rob Zombie talks about his Crowd-Funded Clown Horror Film “31”

Photo Credit: Rob Fenn

Grammy nominated musician, Rob Zombie has written and directed films like “House of 1000 Corpses”, “The Devil Rejects”, “Halloween (2007)”, “Halloween II (2009)” and “The Lords of Salem”. He is currently working on his next film “31”, which is a crown-funded project. The campaign currently ends on Halloween, so if you want to see Rob Zombie’s most brutal film get made head over to RZ-31.com and back it. Media Mikes had a chance to chat again with Rob to discuss the project, fear of clowns and what we can expect.

Mike Gencarelli: Last year, when we spoke you mentioned that “The Broad Street Bullies” would be your next film; what happened?
Rob Zombie: It just kept getting bogged down. “The Broad Street Bullies” is a true story, so unfortunately when you try and branch out and do something like that it is hard. I didn’t own the rights to it and I was working with other people. It is hard enough getting these movies made when you are in total control but when you get other people involved it just sort of drags on. So I worked on it for about two years and I felt like I could spend the next five years working on it and it still might not happen. I like making movies. I don’t like just having meetings and telephone calls. I may go back to it later but I might not since sometimes things just drag on forever. I don’t have forever, you know? I like to work and make movies.

MG: How was the idea for “31” born?
RZ: It came about in a very funny way. Last Halloween, I was in Pomona, CA working on this haunted house attraction I did called, “Great American Nightmare”. I was watching people running around being scared by people dressed as clowns with fake chainsaws and stuff. I saw the true terror on some people’s faces…even though they know it is fake, obviously since it is an amusement park. People just can’t stand clowns. So that was stuck in head. Then I was researching something online and I found out that Halloween was the number one day of the year when people go missing, according to the Missing Persons Bureau. I thought “Hmmmm…missing on Halloween?” Then I thought about the clowns and I ended up concocting this crazy idea about people being kidnapped and forced to battle murderous clowns, sort of like “The Most Dangerous Game” but with disgusting clowns. At the time, I was still working on “Broad Street Bullies” and getting bogged down, so I said to my manager that I was getting frustrated with this movie but I have this other ridiculous idea. I told him the idea and he said “I think I can sell that”. So it’s funny you work on something for years and then come up with this crazy idea off the top of your head and suddenly everyone is excited. That is literally how it happened.

MG: I grew up (and still am) scared of Pennywise from Stephen King’s “IT” but what do you think it about clowns that always scares people?
RZ: Clown makeup is weird and doesn’t hide everything. If you have a gross disgusting face, it almost extenuates it. It does hide your features though. If you just take white clown make up and smear it on your face, it really does make it hard to identify somebody. Think about Cesar Romero as the Joker, he was still so Cesar Romero but at the same time totally not. There is something so subtly disturbing about it. If they have a mask or a hood, they are totally covered but there is something so perverted about grease paint on someone’s face. The funny thing is that as children we are supposed to find these disgusting characters in grease paint adorable? Sorry but they are terrifying.

MG: With sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, what made you take your crowd-funding campaign to FanBacked?
RZ: Originally it wasn’t my idea to crowd-fund, my manager came to me with it. We had a few offers from Kickstarter and the others but FanBacked was brand new and they seemed the most enthusiastic. I liked the vibe of how they worked. It was also focused on entertainment and not all over the board. So we thought, let’s give them a shot and it has worked out great.

MG: What can we expect from this game in the film?
RZ: It is going to keep changing since we haven’t shot the movie yet. We start shooting in February. I love claustrophobic self-contained movies. I never make movies like that. I love films like “Dawn of the Dead”, even though in scope it is a big movie but I always loved when they get stuck in the mall. To me it was always so intense. I just love that idea. All my movies haven’t been self-contained but I have always wished that they were. So what can be more terrifying that being locked in this place and people just keep releasing a homicidal maniac to chase you constantly? There is nowhere to go. If you end up killing one of the guys, your only reward is that they release another one. It is like the coliseum, there is no way out. You literally have to kill every lion to survive. What can be worse than that? That was basically the idea. No rest for the wicked.

MG: Any cast in place yet for the film?
RZ: I have lots of people in mind but I haven’t cast anyone yet or spoken to anyone.

MG: You have said that this will be your most brutal film; any fears of it being censored for its theatrical release?
RZ: Sometimes you have different goals with movies. The goals for “The Lords of Salem” was not to be violent, gory and brutal. The goal of it was to make a slow paced, psychedelic head trip. With “31”, I just wanted to make something that is just so dirty and nasty…that is the goal. Then after you worry about the ratings board, because you can’t predict that they are going to do. If you try and censor yourself in advance, they will find something else. I am just going to make it as fucked up as possible and we’ll figure out a way to get it passed the MPAA. The unrated version then will live on forever, so that is all that matters.

MG: We have three days to go before Halloween and the end of the campaign; what can you tell fans who are looking to back this project?
RZ: We can really use everyone’s help. Even if you can’t donate money, just getting word out is very helpful. Anything helps. People twittering about it on their own is just as helpful as somebody backing it with money. That was always the goal from the get-go. Horror movies have always been a very fan driven industry. When the corporate world gets involved, they always ruin it. I wanted this to be fan involved. So if you want to back this go to RZ-31.com and keep spread the word!

Blu-ray Review “The Zombie Horror Picture Show”

Actors: Rob Zombie
Directors: Rob Zombie
Rated: Unrated
Studio: UMe
DVD Release Date: May 19, 2014
Run Time: 81 minutes

Our Score: 4 out of 5 stars

“The Zombie Horror Picture Show” is the first concert film from musician/director Rob Zombie. The 81 minute feature-length concert film was recorded over two nights in Texas and captures Zombie’s elaborate, multi-media production of mind blowing effects, animatronics robots and pyrotechnics combined with Rob’s powerhouse band featuring John 5, Piggy D and Ginger Fish. The film is being released via UMe and is available in both DVD and Blu-ray formats.

Finally Rob Zombie has decided to capture not only his power live sound but his over the top visual presentation which fans all around the world have to come to expect and love. “Rob Zombie: The Zombie Horror Picture Show” is a bombastic assault on your senses as the bands takes you on a 81 minute musical journey with songs spanning Zombies 20+ year career. The overall look of the film may be a bit chaotic at times but fans of Rob’s work with White Zombie and his subsequent solo career know what to expect.

The sound of the film is top notch only adding to the appeal as songs like “Superbeast”, “Sick Bubblegum” and the semi acoustic “House of 1,000 Corpses” blast through the speakers with clarity while still retaining that live concert feel. My only complaint is that the special features portion of this release is almost non-existent. Included in this section you do get some pretty cool still photos courtesy of Rob Fenn however with this being Zombies first concert film it would have been cool to include some behind the scenes footage and/or band interviews to help make this the total package.

Track Listing:
1.) Teenage Nosferatu Pussy
2.) Superbeast
3.) Super Charger Heaven
4.) Living Dead Girl
5.) We’re An American Band
6.) More Human Than Human
7.) Sick Bubblegum
8.) Never Gonna Stop
9.) Ging Gang Gong De Do Gong De Laga Raga
10.) Meet the Creeper
11.) Angry Red Planet
12.) Mars needs Women
13.) House of 1,000 Corpses
14.) Lords of Salem
15.) Dead City Radio and the New Gods of Super Town
16.) Thunder Kiss ‘65
17.) Dragula

Blu-ray Review “White Zombie (Cary Roan Special Signature Edition)”

Starring: Bela Lugosi, Madge Bellamy, Joseph Cawthorn, Robert Frazer, John Harron, Brandon Hurst
Director: Victor Halperin
Rated: NR (Not Rated)
Studio: VCI Entertainment
Release Date: May 6, 2014
Run Time: 67 minutes

Film: 4 out of 5 stars
Extras: 2.5 out of 5 stars

Bela Lugosi is a legend in the horror business. He gave life and a face to the name Dracula that have lived on for over 80 years. “White Zombie” was a film it did just one year after “Dracula”. In fact, it was also claimed for being the very first zombie movie many many years before George A. Romero did it with “Night of the Living Dead” in 1968. The film has become such a classic among horror fans. The black and white atmosphere in this adds such character to the settings. This is no question best presentation available to date that I have ever seen. If you are a hardcore horror fan and have been holding out, this is the one you want to purchase.

Official Premise: Wealthy Plantation owner Charles Beaumont (Robert Frazer) turns to Voodoo Master Murder Legendre (Bela Lugosi) to lure the woman he loves Madeline Short (Madge Bellamy) away from her fiancé Neil Parker (John Harron), by turning her into zombie. Murders intention are to keep Madeline for himself. Neil seeks out Murder Legendre to break the Zombie spell and return Madeline to the world of the living.

VCI Entertainment has delivered this film under a Cary Roan Special Signature Edition with a new 4k HD transfer of his 35mm film materials. If anyone has seen the fairly recent Kino Blu-ray release of this film you probably haven’t seen the best of reviews. Well this one is not perfect either but it is a vast improvement in both the audio and video department for “White Zombie”. There is no mistaken that this film is still 80+ years old but they really did a solid job of delivering this film in fine form.

The special features on this release are honestly a bit of a let down. The only real extra is a brand-new 2014 audio commentary by Gary Don Rhodes, author of “White Zombie”. This one covers similar ground to Frank Thompson’s track on the Kino Blu-ray release but this is still very interesting and informative. Especially since the film is just over an hour, I was willing to throw it on again right after the first viewing and give it a listen. Other than the commentary track, there is a “White Zombie Theatrical Reissue Trailer”. a bonus “Dracula (1931) Trailer” and a Photo and Poster Gallery included.

Blu-ray Review “Zombie Massacre”

Actors: Christian Boeving, Mike Mitchell, Ivy Corbin, Tara Cardinal, Carl Wharton
Directors: Marco Ristori, Luca Boni
Producers: Uwe Boll
Rated: Unrated
Studio: Entertainment One
Release Date: August 6, 2013
Run Time: 90 minutes

Film: 2.5 out of 5 stars
Extras: 2.5 out of 5 stars

When it comes to zombies, there is no shortage out there with “World War Z” and “The Walking Dead”. “Zombie Massacre” is an adaptation of the Wii video game of the same name. When you think of video game adaptions and horror films, you think of Uwe Boll but no he did not direct this film…but Boll did serve as producer and stars as President of the United States. In terms of zombie horror films, this is nothing special but it does have some decent special effects and plenty of topless women zombies (must have been a bunch of strip bars in the area of the outbreak…obviously…right?). So “Zombie Massacre” doesn’t change the genre but did I mention topless zombies? Nonetheless, I think I am a little bit zombied out recently.

Official Premise: A top-secret bacteriological weapon developed by the U.S.Government to create an army of super soldiers triggers an epidemic that turns the citizens of a quiet town into mutated zombies. In an effort to conceal the outbreak, a team of mercenaries is assembled to infiltrate the infected city and detonate an atomic bomb destroying the monsters and all the evidence along with them. No one has to know the truth…unless the mission fails.

Entertainment One delivered a very impressive 1080p transfer with an aspect ratio of 2.39:1. The transfer is sharp and works well with the make-up effects as well and for a low-budget zombie film, I was impressed.  The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track also works very well with the zombie madness including gunshots and explosions. The special features are nothing special but work checking out for the . “Superfreak: The Making of Zombie Massacre” is a solid 40+minute behind-the-scenes featurette including the special effects. Next there is are two storyboards including a prologue. Lastly, there is also two trailers included.

“The Lords of Salem” Interview Series with Rob Zombie, Sheri Moon Zombie, Meg Foster & John 5

From the singular mind of horror maestro Rob Zombie comes a chilling plunge into a nightmare world where evil runs in the blood. The Lords of Salem tells the tale of Heidi (Sheri Moon Zombie), a radio station DJ living in Salem, Massachusetts, who receives a strange wooden box containing a record, a “gift from the Lords.” Heidi listens, and the bizarre sounds within the grooves immediately trigger flashbacks of the town’s violent past. Is Heidi going mad, or are the “Lords of Salem” returning for revenge on modern-day Salem?

Media Mikes  had a chance to chat with the writer and director Rob Zombie, his wife and star Sheri Moon Zombie, co-star Meg Foster and composer John 5.  Rob Zombie is a heavy metal musician turned writer/director. His films are “House of 1000 Corpses”, “The Devil’s Rejects”, “Halloween (2007)” and “Halloween II (2009)”. Sheri Moon has appeared in all of his films to date but takes the lead in “The Lords of Salem”, which is her best role yet.  Meg Foster is known for her roles in films like “John Carpenter’s They Live” and “Masters of Universe”. She really experienced a major transformation in order to take on her role in “The Lords of Salem”. Please enjoy the interviews and please spread the word.  Post them on Facebook, Twitter…whatever! We need to get the word out! This  film is a must see!

Click on each photo below for our interviews

 

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Rob Zombie talks about writing and directing “The Lords of Salem” and new album “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor”

Rob Zombie is one of the founding members of the band White Zombie, but is notable for his solo act which spawned hits like “Living Dead Girl” and “Dragula”. While still working in music, he turned his sites over to writing and directing films. He has written and directed films like “House of 1000 Corpses”, “The Devil Rejects”, “Halloween (2007)” and “Halloween II (2009)”. His latest film, “The Lords of Salem”, is his most real and dark film to date. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Rob about the film and also his newest solo album “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor”.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us about what or who were you major influences when you were written “The Lords of Salem”?
Rob Zombie: There wasn’t really one thing in particular. Truthfully, the biggest influence for me is that I wanted to make the type of midnight film I remember watching when I was in high school. Back in the day before you can get your hands on everything, I used to have these film books. I used to look at photos from movies like “Suspiria” or “Eraserhead”. I used to say “Fuck, I got to see these movies!” The feeling I would get when I would watch these movies was so special since they were so unique, odd and unlike anything mainstream. I wanted to make a movie that was like that. If you go to see “Lords of Salem” you are going to see something that isn’t what you wouldn’t typical expect to see at the movies. It takes it you to a whole other place. On a grand scale, that was really the inspiration that I wanted to make something like that.

MG: In terms of directing, did you learn any new tricks on this film?
RZ: Well I learned more patience, I think. It is very easy to be impatient when you are making a movie. I learned to just slow the camera down, slow the actors down and let the movie breathe. I wasn’t worried about the audience getting bored or restless, those qualities sometimes can help a movie. It is very easy to make a movie fast paced and keep people interested but sometimes that detracts from the certain mood you are trying to create. Sometimes you need the movie to drag in order to pull people down with it. That was something that I learned on this movie.

MG: The budget was $1.5 million; what was your biggest challenge working with that?
RZ: Everything! [laughs]. Everything was huge challenge. We had no money for anything. The cheapest movie that I have ever made in my life cost $7 million (which was “House of 1000 Corpses”). I was not used to be down in the no budget range. So as we were shooting, I was constantly re-writing the script and constantly changing things. So every second of the day was a challenge.

MG: The witch burning scene was very intense; tell us about shooting that scene?
RZ: We shot that whole scene very quickly, in fact it was done in one night. We had no time. Once again, I had come up with this great plan for shooting the witch burning scene but then I realized that we only had an hour to shoot. I set up one grand shot that I thought would have the most impact and then just went for it. My big goal was to not make it ever look like we didn’t have any time or money. That was what I was always trying to hide.

MG: How did you get genre legends like Patricia Quinn and Meg Foster, who had quite the transformation, on board?
RZ: It was fantastic. I have always loved Patricia Quinn because I was a huge “Rocky Horror” fan. I loved her in everything that she has done but she also hasn’t done a lot. She also hasn’t done a lot recently. But I always wanted to work with her. I had met her over dinner about 15 years ago talking about a movie that never happened, so I had always had her in my mind from day one. Meg Foster was someone who I always thought was cool and very beautiful with those piercing eyes, but I didn’t know if she would be right of this film. I wasn’t sure at first. So I got her on the phone and after talking for about an hour, I know that she would be perfect. She totally understood and got the film.

MG: Being a musician yourself; tell us about working with John 5 on the score?
RZ: He was great to work with on this film and obviously I have been working with John now for over eight years. I know how talented he is, not just as a guitar player but also a musician. It was very easy. I conveyed my ideas and what I was thinking and he executed them perfectly. He was great on this film.

MG: Tell us about the composition of The Lords music track?
RZ: That one was tricky trying to figure out what that track would be. John had worked on a few things and it wasn’t just right. I remember one day we were on the phone together, I was on the east coast and John was on the west, and we were just humming little weird melodies back and forth to each other on the phone. It was then that we found the sound that we were looking for. Neither of us can remember who came up with it first but we just knew we had it when we heard it.

MG: Horror fans are the toughest of any genre fan; what do you think they will appreciate the most within “The Lords of Salem”?
RZ: What I would appreciate most about the film is that it is different. I think that horror fans are tricky. They are all different kinds of people. Sometimes they are not the first ones to embrace something different. But again all of those films that I spoke love as a kid, those weren’t embraced at the time either. So I purposely made a film that would be a tough sell to people…but that is why I made it. I think it will be split. Some people will love it to death and some people just won’t get it.  But that is ok with me since everybody cannot get everything!

MG: Your new album “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” is heavy and dark; tell us about the inspiration behind this album?
RZ: Well I think the movie and album sort of played into each other. I was doing them both around the same time. I had an editing room in my house were we edited the movie. Then we moved the editing room out and moved in a recording studio. I went right from one to the other. I think the vibe of the two projects sort of melded together. I wanted both of them to be weird and unique and that was the goal for me.

MG: Where do you find time to tour, making films and also new music?
RZ: That is all I do man! Where do I find time for anything else is more the question…[laughs].

MG: Do you still plan on directing “Tyrannosaurus Rex” next? What else is in the cards?
RZ: No, that project isn’t happening anymore. What is happening next besides the two we just spoke about is that I will be doing a lot of touring. I headline the Mayhem Fest 2013 tour, which is starting in June and that will go for a while. But the next film project I got is called “The Broad Street Bullies”, which is a true life sports film about the Philadelphia Flyers… which is totally different!

Sheri Moon Zombie talks about her role in “The Lords of Salem”

Sheri Moon Zombie is known best for her roles in her films like “House of 1000 Corpses”, “The Devil’s Rejects”, made by her husband Rob Zombie. She is the star of his latest film “The Lords of Salem” and it is her best role yet. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Sheri Moon about “The Lords of Salem” and what we can expect from the film.

Mike Gencarelli: Your role has a much more serious tone from films like “House of 1000 Corpses”. How did you give life to your character, Heidi?
Sheri Moon Zombie: After I received the script, read it and discussed the character with Rob (Zombie). We talked about what direction we wanted her to go and also about everything from her appearance, dreadlocks, tattoos, wardrobe and to the way her apartment looked. There were so many components to focus on for this character. It was quite an undertaking.

MG: Having worked with your husband, Rob Zombie, now on all of his films. How did this project differ for you?
SMZ: I approach every character that I play differently. They all have been challenging in their own ways. Heidi was particularly challenging for me. I had to work every day on the film. The emotional decline of Heidi was a lot for me to go through and just getting into her head everyday was a lot of work.

MG: Your character has a bunch of tattoos and dreadlocks, how long did it take to transform?
SMZ: Well, some days it was two hours and some days it was three. The tattoos would last for a couple of days. So if the they survived from the day before then it would be a little easier. But it definitely was a process [laughs].

MG: Tell us about working with the phenomenal female cast in the film?
SMZ: I loved working with all the ladies in the film. It was a very female driven cast, which is something you don’t see very often in films these days. The witches from 1692 were so great to work with and they were so free and liberating. Meg Foster was wonderful to work with. Of course, the modern day witches in the movie played by Dee Wallace, Judy Geeson and Patricia Quinn were just amazing to work with as well. I loved how they weren’t overtly looking like witches and were like normal woman for their age. I have known Dee before but working with Judy and Pat were a great experience for me but at the same time very intimidating at first. They were all so warm and fun to work with.

MG: Meg Foster was amazing and really transformed for this film.
SMZ: Yeah, she was fucking insane! What a pleasure to work with her as well!

MG: What was your most favorite scene in the film?
SMZ: My favorite scene that I worked on would have to be the palm reading scene with Patricia, Dee and Judy. It was like seven pages of dialogue that we had to do. I loved the set for Judy’s apartment. That was also the first scene that I had with the three women together. It was a really good day shooting that scene.

MG: The film had some great jumps; anything scare you during the shoot?
SMZ: Nothing really scared me in the film. I wanted to hold some things back for my character’s point of view. When Heidi was sleeping in bed and we see they character Amon, played by Gabriel Pimentel standing beside her bed, I didn’t want to see him in that suit until we actually shot. When you are there on set it is different, nothing is scary.

MG: So ladies choice…you a Rush fan outside of the film? [Note: If you see the film you will understand this question]
SMZ: You know what, I honestly was not a Rush fan in anyway before. When Rob wrote that in the script and picked out the music, I was listening to them because Heidi would have. So there are a few songs that I really like now. I have grown to love me some “Tom Sawyer” since then!

CD Review: Rob Zombie "Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor"

Rob Zombie
“Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor”
T-Boy Records/UMe
Producers: Rob Zombie
Tracks: 12

Our Score: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Rob Zombie is back with a brand new solo album titled “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor”. This is the veteran shock rockers 5th solo album and the follow up to his 2010 album “Hellbilly Deluxe 2”. The album features 11 original tracks and 1 off the wall cover produced by Zombie himself that contain his signature over the top horror fueled sound.

Though the title “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” is quite a mouth full the album continues the long tradition of Zombie albums that date back to the late 80’s.  Sonically “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” is pushed to the very edge of sanity and at times boils over in to insanity. Every conceivable sound layer seems to be utilized providing a different listening experience almost every time you here it. Songs such as “Lucifer Rising” feature driving guitars and thunderous drums while tracks like “Teenage Nosferatu Pussy” feature haunting vocals and lingering samples that permeate in the airiness of the track. The album also features an interesting rendition of the Grand Funk Rail Road classic “We’re an American Band” which I found to be quite entertaining.

Though “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” may not measure up to some of Zombie’s previous work, it is still a pretty impressive piece seeing that both Zombie and guitarist John 5 were splitting time between working on this album and Zombies next film “The Lords of Salem”. A must have for hardcore fans however if you are looking to get in Zombie’s music this is not the album to start with. Fans wanting to pick up a copy of “Venomous Rat Regeneration Vendor” will be able to do so starting on April 23rd.

Track Listing:
1.)    Teenage Nosferatu Pussy
2.)    Dead City Radio and The New Gods of Supertown
3.)    Revelation Revolution
4.)    Theme For the Rat Vendor
5.)    Ging Gang Gong De Do Gong De Laga Raga
6.)    Rock and Roll (In a Black Hole)
7.)    Behold the Pretty Filthy Creatures
8.)    White Trash Freaks
9.)    We’re an American Band**(Grand Funk Railroad cover)
10.)  Lucifer Rising
11.)  The Girl Who Loved The Monster
12.)  Trade in Your Guns for a Coffin