Tommy Blardo and Frank Morin of Enemy Remains talk about their new album “No Faith In Humanity”.

Global Music Award-winning heavy metal group Enemy Remains are set to release their second full-length album on January 20th titled “No Faith In Humanity”. After a lengthy hiatus the band which features original Fates Warning drummer Steve Zimmerman along with Tommy Blardo, Frank Morin, Scott Kadish and Jeff Curtis are ready to unveil their latest creation. Media Mikes had the chance recently to speak with Tommy and Frank about the new albums creation and what it was like reforming the band after their extended break.

Adam Lawton: Can you tell us about the work you have put in on the new album “No Faith in Humanity”?

Tommy Blardo: Funny thing about that, when we signed with Skateboard Marketing we didn’t have one track written for the album, zero, not even ideas. We put a single out, “No Faith in Humanity”, and that’s all we had at the time. It was pretty scary but, I think when you set deadlines it motivates you. Everyone worked really hard on this new album. I wanted to take the band in a whole new direction, new line, new sound, new writing style, new everything! We kind of things a facelift and I think we nailed it.

AL: What were the first couple of writing/rehearsal sessions like after getting back together from your hiatus?

TB: Honestly it was weird, with Steve coming from Fates Warning and playing old prog metal stuff, it was a big change for him, but he was willing to adapt to the new modern style we are going for with hooks but still keeping his roots grounded musically with the off time changes. With the addition of new vocalist Frank “Heretic” Morin, the musical transition seemed to work very well. What Frank has brought to the table just takes so much weight off Steve and I and it really enforces the new sound we were going for.”

AL: At what point did new members come into the picture and, how have they further shaped the new direction of the band?

TB: Frank was added first, I knew we needed a vocalist that could really catch the attention of the listeners with that “radio voice” as they call it – to really fit the new style we had in mind. Scott Kadish (guitars) and Bobby Byrk (keyboards) were added a little later, but were totally involved in the whole writing process. I’ve got to say, this is the strongest line up of professionals we’ve ever had. Band practice has become fun again.”

AL: What can you tell us about the two tracks the band has released thus far from the album?

Frank Morin: I can tell you they were a pain in the ass! Tommy and Steve first approached me with the music to “No Faith In Humanity” and I got really pumped! I had been waiting to jump into a rock/metal project of this caliber for a while, so that song kind of wrote itself based on how I was feeling about the world and the people in it. “Trust in No One” was a little more difficult. It was the first time I played with progressive riffs in a 5 count. It took Tommy and I about an hour to write the hook. Both tracks, like the entire album, touch on personal issues from a singular point of view, though we all share the same ideologies on them. Like the rest of the album we wrote all the music based on the concept, and I just started with the lyrics.

AL: Do you have any touring or performance plans in place to support the release?

TB: At this point we have full press and radio campaigns hitting hard the first week of January and the release of the album is on Jan 20th. After that we have plans to tour the east coast, mid-west and extended dates throughout the west coast by summer. After that hopefully we will be jumping on as a support act for a national artist!

For more info on Enemy Remains you can check out www.facebook.com/enemyremainz

Tommy Wiseau talks about “The Room” Rifftrax Live, James Franco in “The Disaster Artist” and his Hulu series “The Neighbors”

Tommy Wiseau is the director, producer, writer and star of the cult classic film “The Room”. Since the film was released back in 2003 it has achieved “Rocky Horror” like fame playing to midnight screenings non-stop to a huge fan base. Some called the film one of the worst ever made but true fans see “The Room” for what it really it, which is fun! The film was parodied live by the Rifftrax gang last year and is heading back to theaters again on January 28th, 2016. Media Mikes had a chance to catch up with Tommy again to discuss “The Room”, James Franco playing him in “The Disaster Artist” film adaptation and what else he is currently working on.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us how you feel about “The Room” being parodied by Rifftrax Live?
Tommy Wiseau: Yeah they reached out to me about a year ago about doing it. I liked what they did, I mean, I don’t support parts of it 100%, but it does show how fun “The Room” is. People take things too serious and the film isn’t made to be serious, it is made to be fun. If you haven’t seen the Rifftrax Live version of “The Room” in theaters, I would recommend it highly when it comes around again January 28th, 2016. And bring a big group of friends with you as well.

Mike Gencarelli: The film has been out for 13 years now, are you ever taken back by the continued interested in it year after year?
Tommy Wiseau: Yes, I am still surprised. I am happy that people are still talking about it and still seeing it in theaters. I also have been working a few new projects as well that I am excited for fans of “The Room” to see as well. I love touring with the film across the country. I usually show “The Room” and an episode of “The Neighbors” as a double header. It is a lot of fun to do and also getting to interact with the fans.

Mike Gencarelli: Last time we spoke back in 2011, you mentioned you were planning a 3D release for “The Room”; can we expect that soon?
Tommy Wiseau: Yeah that is something that I have wanted to do for a while. Making a film into 3D is definitely not an easy process. So yes, I still want to release “The Room” in 3D, but right now I am not sure if I want to reshoot the entire film in 3D or just convert it. But I am definitely still planning and exploring my options. Right now James Franco is making his film of “The Disaster Artist”, so I will let him have that and then I will focus more on the 3D after it is released.

Mike Gencarelli: Speaking of that, tell us about your feelings on James Franco playing you in the film adaption of Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell’s book “The Disaster Artist”?
Tommy Wiseau: I think James is one best actors in the business. I feel good that someone like him is playing me. Of course, I also feel a little like they are taking something away from me since it is based around my life and my movie. I hope that this is a big success for James since then in return I think it will also then bring more people to “The Room” and that’s good.

Mike Gencarelli: Exactly, I think that this will put your film back in the spotlight and also introduce it to a new audience…
Tommy Wiseau: Yes, exactly. I am hoping about that. James and his brothers are doing a very good job so far and I am excited to see it when it comes out later this year.

Mike Gencarelli: Do you have any involvement or input on the upcoming film?
Yeah James did speak with me about the role and I gave him some tips. My life is very complex but I believe he will do a good job. I also have a small part in the film as well, which is cool.

Mike Gencarelli: Did you enjoy playing the villain Linton Kitano in newly released “Samurai Cop 2: Deadly Vengeance”?
Tommy Wiseau: It is always great to play a villain, I loved it. This film was a very fun experience for me I can tell you that.

Mike Gencarelli: Your TV series “The Neighbors” has aired 6 episodes on Hulu; any plans for more episodes on that format?
Tommy Wiseau: Yes! Currently 6 episodes have aired on Hulu and the fans really have been excited about what we have so far. I am currently working on another 6 episodes for Hulu. We have been also exploring releasing the episodes in animated format as well. So that is something that we were trying and it also getting a good response. I hope to have the next 6 episodes on Hulu by the end of 2016.

Mike Gencarelli: You did a Reddit AMA last year where you mentioned a new project called “The Foreclosure”, what can you tell us?
Tommy Wiseau: Yeah that is a project that I am currently working on as well as “The Neighbors”. “The Foreclosure” focuses on the housing market right now and looks into the current situation that we are facing today with people not being able to pay for their houses and being forced to foreclose. It is a current topic. There is also another project that I have that is currently untitled but that I cannot talk about right now…maybe in about 3-4 months, I can. But a lot of very excited stuff coming up for my fans!

Prong’s Tommy Victor talks about new album “Songs From the Black Hole”

Tommy Victor is the lead singer/guitarist for the heavy metal band Prong. The band has been pummeling people’s ear drums since the late 80’s and has recently released an album of cover material titled “Songs From the Black Hole”. The album is a throwback to the bands early roots based in the NY/DC Hardcore scenes and consists of tracks by bands such as Discharge, Killing Joke and Bad Brains. Media Mikes had the chance to talk with Tommy recently about the album and the bands plans for the upcoming tour season.

Adam Lawton: Can you give us some background as to why you chose to release an album of covers as opposed to an album of new Prong material?
Tommy Victor: We put out a traditional release not too long ago titled “Burning Alive”. We did a lot of touring around that last year which didn’t leave a lot of time to go in and do an actual studio record. We had some time off in Berlin during a festival tour run so instead of sending everyone home we had though to maybe start working on new material however my manager mentioned the idea this covers album to put out via sound cloud or something like that . I knew it would take a little bit of work but as I started investigating which songs to do I started getting more excited about it. By the time we went in and cut the record a lot of the songs had really great arrangements. Jason Christopher and I picked most of the songs and the initial rehearsal session went so well that we decided to get the label involved. It started as this small thing just to kill time but everyone got real excited about it. It was very natural and nothing was forced. That seems to be the way Prong has been rolling these days.

AL: How did the song decision process work between you and Jason?
TV: I had talked to a couple of old friends from back in the day in New York just to be reminded of where we came from a little bit. That was the frame work for a lot of this. Jason knowing that was able to compile a nice list of songs and I supplemented that with a couple of other songs but he pretty much nailed it. Knowing my vocal style and from talking with me and some friends the selection process wasn’t that difficult. We knew we wanted a Black Flag and Discharge song on there and to do a Killing Joke song was obvious. They are my personal favorite group of all time. Bad Brains is another band that influenced not just Prong but countless other bands and music styles. A lot of the choices were very obvious. The Neil Young song is the one that is much different from the rest. We wanted a longer song that could expose our simplicity while still getting a point across. It’s one of Neil’s songs that has been noted as having a good guitar solo so I wanted to try and tackle it and challenge myself. Having a love for all of these bands I think made things come together very nicely.

AL: Was it a conscious decision to do more obscure tracks as opposed to some of the bands better known songs?
TV: A little bit. There were a number of songs mentioned but some of them just seemed too typical. For example I am a fan of the later Black Flag albums which are often ignored but they are albums that influenced me. “The Bars” was the song we ended up choosing from them as it fit our style. There were countless Killing Joke songs we could have done but we chose “Seeing Red” and then for Husker Du we chose probably their most popular song “Don’t Want to Know If You Are Lonely”. There really wasn’t any specific formula for the song selection.

AL: Were there any songs you guys did that didn’t make the album?
TV: There were a couple that I personally liked but they didn’t have as much connection to Prong as the ones that did make the album. We didn’t want to mix in the metal influence with this album as it’s a whole other ball game. There is a definite theme with the NY roots and some of the other songs just didn’t fit with the specifications we set. We wanted to make sure this wasn’t just a hodgepodge of songs and that each song meant something to us and was something that influenced Prong and/or our sound.

AL: The album has some pretty unique artwork. Can you tell us a little bit about that?
TV: Initially there was a guy in Berlin who had been doing a lot of our t-shirts and such however he wasn’t available for this project. I mentioned Mike Lopez to the label and told them I already had a bunch of ideas for how I wanted the cover took look. He took those ideas and came up with a great package. It was a process as we exchanged ideas back and forth for a few weeks. I wanted the artwork to reflect the origins of Prong and where we came from in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. That is a place that doesn’t really exist anymore. We came from this rat infested, party atmosphere where everyone just went crazy. That whole area has changed now but when we were growing up there it was a lot of violence and crime. It was very chaotic. Mike took all that stuff and put it together into what you see on the cover of this album.

AL: What type of tour plans are you planning in support of this release?
TV: We have a tour scheduled for Europe in the coming weeks. After that we have a very large tour set for the States starting in October. To get all the dates people can check out www.prongmusic.com

Tommy Reid talks about his new documentary film “Superthief” and “I Know that Voice”

In 1972, Cleveland-based burglar and bank robber Phil Christopher helped pull off the biggest bank robbery in US history when the stole an estimated $30 million from the United California Bank.  Director Tommy Reid has turned the heist into the new documentary film, “Superthief,” which is now out on DVD.

Born in New Jersey, Tommy Reid directed his first film, “7-10 Split,” while attending Ohio State University.  His next film was the brilliant documentary about another Cleveland mobster, “Danny Greene:  The Rise and Fall of the Irishman.”  So interesting was the subject that Reid helped produce a feature film about Greene entitled “Kill the Irishman.”  His next project is the behind the scenes look at voice over actors called “I Know that Voice.”

Earlier this week Reid took time out to talk about his career.  Before the interview we talked some football – he seemed to think my Kansas City Chiefs would do well this year with new Coach Andy Reid (no relation) at the helm.  On the record we talked gangsters, making movies and the possibility of directing his sister, Tara, again (“Sharknado II” anyone?)

Mike Smith:  What drew you to highlight the United California Bank Robbery in “Superthief?”
Tommy Reid:  I went to THE Ohio State University Undergrad and a lot of my buddies in my fraternity were from the Cleveland area.  I’d go up there with them a bunch, usually over holiday weekends and summers.  I really like the Cleveland area.  And I had some buddies that were really into the mafia and they would tell me stories.  I ended up making a movie called “Kill the Irishman,” which was about the Cleveland mafia.  It’s a great movie with Val Kilmer, Christopher Walken, Paul Sorvino, Vincent D’Onofrio…the list goes on and on.  If you haven’t see it please go see it.  (NOTE:  I’d already seen it and like Mr. Reid says, it’s a great movie).  It turns out that the author of the book I optioned to make “Kill the Irishman” was also writing a book about Phil Christopher and the biggest bank robbery in US history.  The story intrigued me and I knew that was a movie right there.   The book was ok but I thought there was a lot of subject matter that needed to be expanded so I wanted to do a documentary on the subject of Phil Christopher alone…to tap into his mind how this all went down.  How did he get his training…how did he get into a career of crime?  And that’s what intrigued me.  It became a passion project.  Phil Christopher agreed to an exclusive interview and he did so with a compliment, as he really loved what I’d done with “Kill the Irishman.”  He felt why not give it a try.

MS:  That kind of answers a little bit of my second question as to why both of your documentaries deal with Cleveland crime figures.  As a filmmaker was that something you enjoyed investigating…true crime?
TR:  Yes I do.  It’s like a “whodunit” type of situation.  You always try to put the pieces together.  For me as a filmmaker I always like to see where the path went wrong…where was the fork in the road where they chose between right and wrong?  Which path did they go down?  And I think I identified that in “Superthief.”  That was the fun part for me.  To go back and look at a crime that had almost become an urban legend and to really tackle the fundamentals on how it all went down.

MS:  You’ve directed both fictional features and documentaries.  Do you have a preference?
TR:  Actually I just finished another documentary.  Documentaries are really fun.  Very fun to make.  Very fun to produce.  But there’s also something that’s really fun with working with actors.  Making a fictional feature film is very fun but very exhausting.  Working with actors is sometimes a little overwhelming.  Not only do they want to look good but they want “their” take.  The get upset at the director if they don’t use “their” take.  Which is why you never let them in the edit bay (laughs).  For the most part they’re both fun but they’re different beasts.   Of course you have a better chance of making a profit for your investors on a fictional feature film then a documentary, unless you’re doing a documentary on Justin Bieber or One Direction or something like that.  (NOTE:  Mr. Reid knows of what he speaks – this past weekend the new documentary concert film featuring One Direction brought in $17 million).  For the most part documentaries don’t really have a big impact on the market place.  They get popular from word of mouth.  From people asking “have you seen this movie” and then telling their friends to go rent it.

MS:  You turned Danny Greene’s story into a fictional feature.  Do you have any plans to do the same with Phil Christophers?
TR:  Absolutely.  We already have a script written and it’s phenomenal.  It was adapted by the writers who have a new show coming up this season on NBC.  It’s called “The Blacklist” with James Spader.  It’s a very well written and thrilling script that we have that we’re trying to raise money for to make into a feature film.

MS:  And you will be directing the film?
TR:  I will.

MS:  You’ve directed your sister, Tara, in the past.  Any plans to work together again?  And how is the relationship on set?
TR:  Tara is very professional on set so it’s always a director/actor relationship.  She took direction well and was very easy to work with, so we didn’t have that brother/sister thing on set.  Thank God.  Right now there’s no plans to work with her in the future but it’s always a possibility.  (NOTE:  Keep those fingers crossed, “Sharknado” fans!)

MS:  Final question – what are you working on next?
TR:  I just finished a movie called “I Know That Voice,” which is all about the biggest voice actors in the industry.  It covers the history of the voice actor, from Mel Blanc, who was “the man of 1,000 voices,” to the biggest stars today.  We also talk to “Simpsons” and “Futurama” creator Matt Groenig,  “Phineas and Ferb” creators Dan and “Swampy” (NOTE:  Dan Povenmire and Jeff “Swampy” Marsh) as well as vocal stars like Hank Azaria, John Di Maggio, Billy West.  Jim Cummings, who’s Winnie the Pooh.  June Foray, who’s 95.  She was the voice of Rocky the Squirrel and is still working today.  We cover everyone.  It’s an amazing movie.  It’s coming out VOD (Video on Demand) in December.  We’re planning on a one-week theatrical debut in Columbus, Ohio in November and hopefully we’ll have the DVD on the market in October.

Tommy Wiseau’s “The Room” Finally Hits Blu-ray!

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE BLU-RAY FROM AMAZON

The film has been called “the Citizen Kane of bad movies” and one of the worst films ever made. Since it’s release in 2003, the film quickly developed a very large cult following and has been celebrating midnight screenings ever since then like “The Rocky Horror Picture Show”. Check out our interviews with Tommy Wiseau and Greg Sestero. Amazon lists the following information for the Blu-ray: “The Room Blu-ray will feature the first ever option of Combination Languages (CL) Combo Languages in which you can view multiple subtitles on screen simultaneously. It is the first Blu-ray format in the world. It features English, French, Spanish, Italian, German options. The Room Blu-ray has additional special features like behind the scenes footage, scene selection, trailers, deleted scenes, photo gallery and interviews.”

Official Synopsis: “The Room” is an electrifying American black comedy about love, passion, betrayal and lies. It has five major characters, Johnny, played by Tommy Wiseau is a successful banker with great respect for an dedication to the people in his life, especially his future wife Lisa. Johnny can also be a little too trusiting at times which haunts him later on. Lisa, played by Juliette Danielle, is the beautiful blonde fiance of Johnny. She has always gotten her way and will manipulate to get what she wants. She is a taker, with a double personality, and her deadly schemes lead to her own downfall. Mark, played by Greg Sestero, is a young, successful and independent best friend of Johnny. He has a good heart, but gets caught up in Lisa’s dangerous web and gives in to temptation. This eventually brings him to great loss. Claudette, played by Carolyn Minnott, is the classy, sophisticated mother of Lisa who has had disappointing relationships in her life. She wants her daughter to be married as soon as possible so she can benefit. Denny, played by Philip Haldiman, is an orphan boy, naive and confused about life, love, and friendship. Denny is a very ambitions and also very grateful tot he people who are in his life. “The Room” depicts the depths of frienships and relationships in one life and raises life’s ral and most asked question: “Can you ever really trust anyone? Enter “The Room” and leave forever changed!

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE BLU-RAY FROM AMAZON

“Tommy” director Ken Russell dead at 84

Ken Russell, the British filmmaker who successfully brought the Who’s rock opera “Tommy” to the big screen, died yesterday (November 27) in his sleep. At the time of his death he was beginning pre-production on a new film, a musical version of “Alice in Wonderland.”

Seen as both flamboyant and controversial, Russell dreamed as a child of being a ballet dancer. But after a stint in the Royal Air Force and the Merchant Navy, and unsuccessful attempts at dancing and photography, he got a job working in television. After many successful years creating documentaries for the BBC he directed his first feature film, a 1963 comedy called “French Dressing.” The film was a rousing failure and it wasn’t until 1967 that he was allowed a second feature. “Billion Dollar Brain,” featuring Michael Caine, was well received and led to the film that would be considered his breakthrough.

In 1969 Russell released “Women In Love,” an adaptation of the D.H. Lawrence novel. The film starred Glenda Jackson, Oliver Reed and Alan Bates. The film gained notoriety for a nude wrestling scene and was among the first films to show male genitalia on screen. The film was nominated for eleven BAFTA awards as well as four Academy Awards, including a nomination for Russell. This would be his only Oscar nomination for direction. Glenda Jackson won the Best Actress Academy Award for her performance in the film.

As the 1970s began, Russell found himself edited by the studios he worked for. His 1971 release “The Devils” was so upsetting that Warner Brothers refused to release it without some cuts. The film featured Oliver Reed (a Russell regular) as a priest who defies a corrupt church and state. Most of the brouhaha over the film came from the scenes featuring sexuality among nuns. Despite, or in spite of, the outrage the film led the British box office for eight straight weeks. In 1975 he released his vision of the Who’s “Tommy.” Featuring Ann Margaret, Jack Nicholson, Roger Daltrey and Elton John, the film earned Margaret an Academy Award nomination for Best Actress. He teamed up with Daltrey for his next project, “Lisztomania,” He ended the 70’s with the biopic “Valentino.”

In 1980 Russell collaborated with writer Paddy Chayefsky for the film adaptation of Chayefsky’s novel, “Altered States.” Starring William Hurt, the film is better known for the many on-set arguments between director and writer. Blaming his many quarrels with Chayefsky for “blacklisting” him in Hollywood, Russell made one more film in America, the very kinky “Crimes of Passion” with Kathleen Turner and Anthony Perkins. Returning to England he directed such period films as “Gothic,” with Gabrielle Byrne and “The Lair of the White Worm.”

In 1990 Russell took a job in front of the camera, appearing in a pivotal role opposite Sean Connery, Michelle Pfeiffer and Roy Scheider in “The Russia House.” His last significant film as a director was the 1991 film “Whore,” which starred Theresa Russell (no relation). Slapped with an NC 17 rating, the film could not be advertised on television nor could posters be displayed. The studio re-titled the film, “If You Can’t Say It, Just See It.” Russell was vocally upset at the film’s rating, noting that the same year’s “Pretty Woman” was given an “R” rating, noting that his film dealt with the hardships of prostitution while the Julia Roberts film just glamorized the profession.

An accomplished author, Russell wrote six novels along with several books on filmmaking. In 1989 he released his autobiography.

Tommy Wiseau talks about “The Room” and his plans for the 3D & Blu-ray release

Tommy Wiseau is best known for his film “The Room”. The film has gained an incredible cult status and is a popular midnight screening. Tommy is currently touring with the film all over the world. Some hate the movie calling it “one of the worst movies ever made” and others love it calling it “so bad it is good”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Tommy about the success of the film and what else he has planned.

Mike Gencarelli: Are you surprised by the cult status that “The Room” has achieved and has become a midnight screening cult classic?
Tommy Wiseau: Oh yeah, with our last screening we had over 900 people show up. I did a Q&A and I love it. We travel a lot with the film. I love talking with the people and I guess they like me too [laughs]. The midnight screenings started because we got thousands of emails demanding to see “The Room” in Los Angeles, which is how everything started. The background to the story started when we submitted the film to the Academy Awards. We were screening it in Los Angeles two a half weeks after that and we received all those emails. We then started screening at Wilshire Screening Room in Los Angeles. We got so many people showing up we had problems with fire marshal and people were literally sitting on the floor. I called the theater and said if we could screen it also at midnight and that is how the midnight screenings started.  Now we have screenings spread out all over the entire world like UK, Canada, New Zealand etc.  So we are very happy with what happened.

MG: Tell us about how you shot “The Room” with both 35mm and HD cameras?
TW: Yep, we used two cameras shooting “The Room”. One was HD and one was 35mm. Some people are blogging about this incorrect, I shot it that way to learn about it. At the time, eight years ago or so there was not enough information about HD. Right now HD is the biggest ever. “The Room” is the only feature movie in the world that is shot at the same time on the same rig with both cameras.  I am very happy with what I did.

MG: Did you find any real challenges shooting “The Room” that way?
TW: Some people think that all this has just happened by accident with “The Room”. You have to prepare to film or a TV show or whatever. It is a process and you have to apply certain things and be organized. It is a lot of work but I enjoy it. Some things take a long time. I have been working on “The Room” almost 15 years before we released. It is not something that just happened by accident. On the set of “The Room” using the process  of working with the two cameras, I changed the crew four times while filming. Some of them quit and some I fired. People tried to tamper with the project and you could write a book about it. Actually, I am writing a book about it between the difference between 35mm and HD. What is the difference? What is the cost? I think my book, which will be released this year, will relate to the simplicity of the industry and how Hollywood embraced HD. From the beginning Hollywood did not want to embrace HD format, the reason was because everything was set on the 35mm umbrella. We find now that a lot of people are changing between the two formats.

MG: What can you tell us about “The Room” in 3-D and the Blu-ray release?
TW: We will be releasing it on Blu-ray before Christmas and I am also working releasing the film in 3D. With HD it is a great format for 3D but so is 35mm. Film is film. You cannot match film by using an HD camera, you can come pretty close but it is not the same. The fact is also when you watch 3D, you have a slightly different experience. I have been experimenting already with some clips from “The Room” and it looks great and that is why I want to do it. I also wanted to show viewer that they have choices. It is very detail oriented work. So first the Blu-ray will be released this year before Christmas and we will be doing “The Room” Blu-ray tour across the country…maybe across the world. The 3D will be between 2011 and 2012. It is definitely the future.

[UPDATE: The Blu-ray is finally arriving on December 28, 2012.  Click here to purchase on Amazon.]

MG: With the huge following of “The Room”, why haven’t you made another feature follow-up?
TW: Well I am not sure if you know but, I am working on this sitcom called “The Neighbors” currently, which will be released this year. I am also working on another movie relating to the economy and then also a vampire movie. If you are referring to “The Room” prequel or sequel, at this time I think we need to get at least 80% of America to see “The Room” first [laughs]. Then I might consider something else with “The Room”.

MG: What can you tell us about the sitcom “The Neighbors”?
TW: It is a TV sitcom I am working on and you can check out the site at http://www.theneighborssitcom.com. We will be releasing the first episode in about 45-60 days on that site. I am acting in the show as a character named Charlie. One of the actors from “The Room” will be connected to the production as well. It is for entertainment and is slightly different from what you are used to on the TV station. When you watch the sitcom people will have a groovy time and enjoy it and that is basically what it is.

MG: How did you get involved with the horror comedy short “The House That Drips Blood on Alex”?
TW: They sent me a script. It was sponsored by Comedy Central and Atom.com and they hired me as an actor. I did not direct the project. My background is an actor. It was a pretty excited project. They could have done a better job but it is what it is.

MG: Tell us about working with showing the movie on Adult Swim and appearing on “Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!”?
TW: I have been on the show four times now. Tim and Eric are really great people to work with. They have great vision of what they want. They also hired me as an actor, not a director. Some of their stuff is completely off the wall. They are fans of “The Room” as well and are just so fun to work with. I hope I will be working with them again soon. I believe Adult Swim will be screening “The Room” again for the third year in a row on Adult Swim on April 1st. So, I am very happy with that.

MG: What can you say to people that haven’t yet seen “The Room”?
TW: I like people to express themselves. You don’t have to like the whole movie. I want people to have a groovy time and forget the world a little bit. I realize that during the screenings in Los Angeles that people are really enjoying it and that is what “The Room” is all about. The people that give the negative stigma about the film should just grow up. This is just to entertain you and that is what it is. I don’t think that it is the best of the best, [laughs] actually everyone says it is the worst of the worst [laughs]. My job as an actor/director is to make people laugh. When you see “The Room”, people need to forget what is happening at home, at work, in society and just isolate yourself and have fun. What shocked me the most Michael is that people are quoting the script and I love it. It is a compliment to me. I just want people to have fun and enjoy.

MG: