Patrick Hinds’ Hit Podcast “True Crime Obsessed” Expands Brand With New Series “Obsessed With: Abducted In Plain Sight”

The New Podcast Hosted by ‘Abducted in Plain Sight’ Documentary Director Skye Borgman and Co-hosted and Produced by Patrick Hinds to Reveal Never-Before-Heard Information About the Case

Los Angeles – (February 10, 2020) – Patrick Hinds, one of the creative minds behind the hit comedy/true crime podcast True Crime Obsessed, today announces the formation of Obsessed Network and its first production, spin-off podcast series Obsessed With. Obsessed With will commence with the release of the first season titled Obsessed With: Abducted in Plain Sight. Diving deep into one of the most shocking and controversial documentaries in recent years, the new podcast will be hosted the film’s director Skye Borgman and co-hosted and produced by Patrick Hinds, and will feature chilling never-before-heard audio from the film and new interviews with the documentary’s producers and subjects – including Jan Broberg herself, whose story is told in the film. All four episodes of the podcast, which will strike a more serious tone than its predecessor True Crime Obsessed, will be available across major podcast platforms and on ObsessedNetwork.com on March 2nd, 2020.

Over the course of four episodes delivered in a binge, Skye and Patrick will go deeper into the case revealed in Abducted in Plain Sight. In the podcast, Jan Broberg addresses her father’s sexual encounter with her kidnapper, her father’s sexual orientation, and the world’s vitriolic reaction to her parents after the release of the film. The podcast will also include audio recordings of the kidnapper’s audio journals that were recovered by the FBI, the kidnapper’s wife sharing her thoughts on her husband’s more virtuous qualities, and more.

“After audiences around the globe were captivated by the original documentary, they still had many questions,” said podcast host and director of Abducted in Plain Sight, Skye Borgman. “There are so many untold stories I wanted to share. Collaborating with Patrick on Obsessed With: Abducted in Plain Sight provides an opportunity to expand upon the documentary. And, I get to hang out with Patrick Hinds!” 

“I became literally obsessed with Abducted in Plain Sight, so to work with Skye Borgman on the first large-scale project for Obsessed Network outside of our original podcast is thrilling,” said Patrick Hinds, creator of Obsessed Network.  “If you thought the documentary was wild, just wait until you hear the never-before-made-public recordings this podcast will unearth.”

About Obsessed Network:

Obsessed Network, created by Patrick Hinds, comprises a collection of some of the best true crime podcasts on the internet, including “True Crime Obsessed,” the upcoming “Obsessed With” series, and a forthcoming project with journalist Maggie Freleng. Obsessed Network is headquartered in New York City.   

Patrick Hinds and Gillian Pensavalle discuss their podcast “True Crime Obsessed” and upcoming tour

You know that feeling you get when hanging out with your best friends? That sense of pure joy that comes from sharing a love of the same things, laughing at anything possible, and being there for each other through even the toughest of times. Well, if you love True Crime as much as I do, let me introduce you to your two new best friends and hosts of the True Crime Obsessed Podcast, Patrick Hinds and Gillian Pensavalle.

Since May 2017, this pair of theater kids have been watching True Crime documentaries and recapping them to their audience in a way that can only be described at hilarious. From garbage bells to super-hot husbands to Patrick’s infectious laugh, these two know how to take even the worst documentary and make you feel like you are laughing about it with your best friends.

Recently, Media Mikes had the exciting opportunity to talk with Patrick and Gillian about their podcast and upcoming tour and they did not disappoint.

Channah Zapotoczny: Why you picked the format with you did with the documentaries for your true crime podcast?
Patrick Hinds: You know it’s so funny cause I think about this all the time. When we decided to work together, we sort of work shopped different ideas together of what kind of true crime podcast we wanted to make. We were going to make a three-part podcast every week that was going to dry and straight forward. It would start with an interview segment and then we would talk about something that we have seen, like a TV show or another podcast or something and then the last part would be focused on true crime. So we were doing this pilot episode and when we sat down to do the part when we talk about something, we decided to talk about the documentary “The Imposter”. Gillian and I were relatively new friends at that point. We knew that we really enjoyed each other but I didn’t know that she was like a completely unintentional comedian. So when we started talking about “The Imposter”, the things that stood out to her was like the quirky details or the things that we were really enraging and she has this really funny way of articulating it. So I was laughing hysterically and we had no thought of making a comedy podcast. So when I was listening back to all the different segments and putting it together. I realized that there was nothing else out there in the podcast space with two friends just recapping true crime documentaries and I said I think found our podcast.
Gillian Pensavalle: And even still it has evolved into the madness it is today. In the early episodes, we sound like we are not trying to disturb someone in the next room. In those very early episodes, you can hear Patrick laughing off mic and not really leaning into what/who we are.
Patrick: I wanted to make a nerdy high brow NPR thing, so then we opened up the wine and the bourbon and started making it for real [laughs].
Gillian: Yeah!
Channah: What’s funny is that when I am listening Gillian, you comments are exactly what I am thinking…
Patrick: [laughs] That’s why it works, so many of our listeners say to us that we are having the conversations they wish they were having with their friends when watching these documentaries. It is so funny because a podcast like that should exist but it wasn’t what we meant to make at all.

Channah: So if you could would you go back and change anything?
Patrick & Gillian (together): Nooooooooooo!
Patrick: We were lucky enough that we both of us have been making podcasts long enough to know that the show will become what it is suppose to be. So I am just so glad we have the common sense to let it be what it was clearly meant to be, right?
Gillian: Right, I love the evolution of it. In all of the podcasts that we have worked on or are working on, there is that evolution you can see. Especially for Hamilcast, in the beginning it is not what it is now. It just became that. We just leaned into what it is. We didn’t even think anyone would be listening.
Patrick: That’s true we made this thing just so that we could hang out. We didn’t make it to have it be as successfully as it is.

Channah: How long do your recordings typically take?
Gillian: A long time. Well because, we do a lot in one sitting.
Patrick: We do like five ads per episode. We do a bonus episode every week and then the regular episode. Sometimes twice a month we will do an after party, which is us just hanging out talking about whatever is one our minds or usually “Newsies” the movie [laughs].
Gillian: Yes, most importantly “Newsies” the movie [laughs].
Channah:
That is such a good movie and is one of my favorites.
Patrick: Oh God it is so good… So recording could sometimes take like five hours. We always know that we nailed it though when we are starving, sweating through our clothes and have no voices.
Gillian: We usually start at 5:30pm and go to 10:30pm and by the end of it my eyes are usually half closed. And that is after working all day on top of it.
Patrick: I just realized our last recording day, I worked 17 hours. I was up at 4:15am to watch everything and then we recorded that night till 10:30pm. It was insane.
Gillian: The thing is that when it is 9:30pm and we are recording the last thing, it can’t sound like it’s the last thing. It has to sound like it is the first thing or the only thing.
Patrick: Exactly! Gillian and I don’t get much of a chance to hang out during the week anymore and it is our only hang night. We are never manufacturing that last hour. I feel like the last hour is usually the best because we are so amped at that point.

Channah: So a fun question for you; let’s say someone was going to bring you in to consult on a documentary and you were going to help them make it. What would be your advise to them to make the documentary great?
Patrick: I love the thing these documentaries are doing when they will setup an interview subject and not tell them that the camera is rolling. The interview subject thinks the camera is on when they get asked the first question but it is rolling the whole time and you get people doing ridiculous things like adjusting their genitals or talking to themselves and they always keep it. I am obsessed with it.
Gillian: That is always great.
Patrick: I worked with a director recently and one of the things that that I learned about making a bonkers documentary was that they did all these interviews with all these experts, put them in the film and then went and took them out. Listen if your story is that bonkers and the experts are getting in the way. I say get rid of them. Get rid of them.
Gillian: Just let it become what it will become. “Capturing the Friedmans” is not about the dad and his issues. It was about this circus clown, so then it became about that.
Patrick: In conclusion, give me a strong 90 minutes. Nobody needs longer than 90 minutes. We always talk about this documentary “The Long Shot”
Gillian: 42 minutes!
Patrick: 42 minutes is a dream, you are in and out. You laugh, you cry. It’s perfect.
Gillian: It leaves you wanting more.

Channah: On your show, you were so excited to meet Rabia (Chaudry) and talk with her. Was meeting her everything you hoped for?
Patrick: Rabia and I had a conversation on the phone and we were in love. It was wonderful. The first time I met her was at CrimeCon, our booths were near each other. Because I had that long phone conversation with her, I ran over to her booth and literally knelt down and she looked at me like she was going to call the police. She had absolutely no clue who I was. I just sat there and thought this wasn’t the reaction I expected. After I told her who I was it was great.
Gillian: Then you dragged her over to me…
Patrick: Do you remember how amazing that moment was…
Gillian: That was amazing.
Patrick: We could stop screaming about how amazing she smelled and we just kept hugging her. She was hugging us back. Rabia gives back the energy that you give her. We were so excited to meet her and she was then so excited to meet us.
Gillian: I loved hugging her and smelling her…and that’s not weird [laughs].
Patrick: We are doing two shows with her. Our show in D.C. and Orlando, we are doing with Rabia and Susan (Simpson).

Channah: I will be at the show in Orlando. Are you guys worried about coming to Florida?
Patrick: [laughs] We are afraid that we are going to be met with pitchforks and alligators at the airport. No, I am very much looking forward to going to Florida.
Gillian: A lot of them just lovingly want to change our minds. And our minds aren’t set. We have a very specific job, which is talking about what is in the documentary.
Patrick: It is not our fault that Wrinkles the Clown was from Florida [laughs]

Channah: Speaking about the tour though, I know you are doing three different types of shows. What can we expect from it?
Patrick: Actually, the funny thing is in Florida it’s the only show that we are doing that we have never done before. In Boston, we are doing the show with Lance (Reenstiema), Tim (Pilleri) and Maggie (Freleng) and we are covering “Missing Maura Murray”. The reason we are doing this show again is because we did it in Brooklyn and it was just so great. The pride show in San Francisco and Seattle is just going to be so gay [laughs]. So Florida and D.C. with Rabia and Susan are going to be fun. We warned them they are walking into the lions den.

Channah: Since you will be in Orlando for your show, does that mean you will be coming to CrimeCon 2020?
Patrick: You know, we don’t know yet. We are trying to figure out our schedules, so once we do we will let everyone know.
Channah: If you do attend, is there anyone you wish will be seated next to you?
Patrick: Last year, we were right next to Susan and Rabia, so that is my fav. If Lance, Tim or Maggie are there, we would love to be next to them. Maybe stick us next to someone we’ve never met before, that would be fun.
Gillian: Well there are some parameters…
Patrick: Yeah, we don’t want to be next to Nancy Grace…
Gillian: Or the Cannibal Cop… they are both always at CrimeCon [laughs]

Channah: Patrick, in almost every episode you claim that someone is hot. If you had to rank your top three, who would they be?
Patrick: Let’s start with Ryan Ferguson, that has to be number 1.
Gillian: I approve.
Patrick: I am in the middle of editing episode two right now of “Don’t Fuck with Cats” and I am on the record of saying that John is hot…
Gillian: John Green?
Patrick: Yeah, John Green.
Gillian: Ok I will accept [laughs]. We also have a lot of women that we think are super hot and super smart…
Patrick: Totally…
Gillian: We had someone in “Dirty John”, the super hot smarty pants girl…
Patrick: Laura Richards…
Gillian: Yes, Laura Richards. And so many people in “Holy Hell”. It’s always weird cause when we are recording it’s just like we are hanging out and we forget other people are listening. So when people from the documentary reach out to us and it happens more often then you think, we forget that other people are listening.
Patrick: I really want Deanna (Thompson) from “Don’t Fuck with Cats” to be our friend
Gillian: I love her.

Channah: Is there anything that you wished I asked that I didn’t?
Patrick: Just that TCO has some really super awesome announcements coming out. So just keep an eye out for that!

Sharni Vinson talks about new film “Patrick: Evil Awakens”

Copyright 2013 Roget Clinic Pty Ltd.

Sharni Vinson is an Australian actress that got her American debut in the dance film “Step Up 3D”. Since then she has starred in numerous strong female leads like the Australian shark thriller “Bait 3D” and last year’s action/horror film “You’re Next”. She is an actress that is not afraid to get her hands dirty and she plays these fantastic roles. Media Mikes had a chance to talk with Sharni about her latest new film “Patrick: Evil Awakens” and what we can expect next.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us what drew up into the role for “Patrick: Evil Awakens”?
Sharni Vinson: I think a lot of things at the time drew me to the film. I always like to keep an eye out for any Australian projects that come up. I am Australian and I love getting a chance to get back there and shoot a film with my people [laughs]. So, the fact that this was an Australian movie interested me immediately. The attached cast was a big draw as well. Charles Dance and Rachel Griffiths are two actors that I definitely look up to and admire their work. I thought it would be a great challenge for me. So I wanted to take the opportunity. I also liked that it was a remake of a successfully film from the 70’s, I was also very enticed to see how it could progress with today’s technology advancement.

MG: What is your process for getting into a character like Kathy?
SV: We did not have any rehearsals for this movie. We never had any table readings. It was really interesting actually. I flew into Australia from America the day before we started shooting. So I hadn’t met anybody from the film and you know they say you are supposed to develop all this chemistry beforehand. But the process for this one was quite minimal and really unfolded as we were shooting. I felt like with the set, which was so dark and our wardrobes was really what put us into the character. As soon as I put on that uniform, I started to visualize how it was going to unfold. It was a lot of happening in the moment. Each project is different and this was a great experience getting to do it so naturally.

MG: What was your biggest challenge working on this film?
SV: It was a very smooth shoot. We didn’t run into too many problems. I think maybe the most challenging part could have been was that I was working with an actor, in more than 50% of my scenes, who was in a coma. So he did not speak at all. It was a lot of it was reacting and then reacting to yourself as well. I felt like it was almost along the lines of green screen work, which was very different for me. So that was definitely was quite the challenge I think.

MG: You are known for playing really strong female leads like in “Bait 3D”, “You’re Next” and now this; what do you enjoy most about kicking ass and getting your hands dirty?
SV: HA! It is exactly that what I love about them [laughs]. I grew up in Australia on a farm. I grew up in the dirt and in the ocean and was always very physical. I did a lot of dancing and swimming growing up. With movies, we all know it can get quite tedious sitting on the set for long hours and there is a lot of waiting involved. So when you are doing a role that is heavily involvement with action and utilizing a strong physicality you are always getting to work with a stunt coordinator or trainer in your downtime. I would always rather keep going in my downtime than stop. When you have downtime, you sort of realize how exhausted you really are but if you keep going you feel like you are Superman or something…it is crazy [laughs]. Action and horror genres have been quite good to me. That’s three in a row…

Copyright 2013 Roget Clinic Pty Ltd.

MG: Yeah, I was going to bring up the common theme genre of horror you have trending; what draws you to these films?
SV: I almost want to say that is complete coincidence. I grew up watching horror movies and now I am shooting them. I was absolutely obsessed with them growing up from a really young age. It wasn’t even that I put it out there that I wanted to do horror, these are the roles that I have come my way and that I have taken a liking to. They also, like you mentioned, have that strong female character in them and that is great also and I am enjoying getting a chance to play those characters.

MG: What else do you have planned for 2014 and beyond?
SV: I am very excited to get “Patrick” out there, which comes out March 14th. Next, I am actually doing a film in China mid-year. It is going to be awesome. A part of the film “Bait” was shot in China, so I am excited to get to back there. I do not think the film has settled on a final title yet, so keep an eye out.

Matthew Patrick Davis talks about his stage version of Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas”

Photo Credit: Joanna Brooks

You may not know the name Matthew Patrick Davis yet but he is making a name for himself very quickly. He recently made headlines when his stage version of “Jack’s Lament” for “Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas” showed up on online. He has also been behind some very funny stage productions with the UCB Theatre including “The Shining! The Musical!” and “Jurasic Park: The Musical!”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Matthew about his work and what he has planned next.

Mike Gencarelli: Let’s talk about your stage version of “Jack’s Lament” for Tim Burton’s “The Nightmare Before Christmas”? Have you been contacted at all or do you have plans to expand it?
Matthew Patrick Davis: As a 6’8” physical actor who grew up loving Tim Burton, Danny Elfman and Oingo Boingo, playing Jack in a live adaptation of “The Nightmare Before Christmas” has always been a dream of mine. A couple years ago, I put up a few scenes from “Nightmare” in my acting class. The class freaked out and got super excited about it, so that’s when we decided to shoot some of it, and that’s where the video comes from. If this video could accomplish anything, I guess it would be for it to be a viral thingy and get the attention of the people that own the rights and actually have the power to make it a legitimate piece of theatre: Tim Burton and Thomas Schumacher, the President of Disney Theatrical Group. It would obviously have such mass appeal, and I think could be something insanely great.

MG: Tell us how did you come up with the ideas for “The Shining! The Musical!” and “Jurassic Park: The Musical?”
MPD: I write the movie musicals with my friends Joe Chandler and Zach Paez; friends from high school who are now television writers in Los Angeles. We just pick movies that we love, and musicalize them into part parody, part tribute. “Jurassic Park” was a movie that was very formative in our youth; as 14 year olds, we would often be found doing impressions of the Raptors or the Spitter in a Denny’s parking lot somewhere. “The Shining” is another one of our favorite films — we just enjoyed the juxtaposition between the darkness of man slowly going insane and trying to murder his family, with the light-heartedness of a musical.

MG: Any plans to ever perform these again or record and release them?
MPD: We perform the movie musicals semi-regularly at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Los Angeles, so there will definitely be another performance sometime in the future.

MG: What do you have planned next to turn into a musical?
MPD: We’ve done four movie adaptations, (JP, The Shining, The NeverEnding Story, and The King of Kong) so next, we would love to do an original. So we’ll do that, and/or do one of the movies we’ve always talked about doing, i.e. T2, Top Gun, Glengarry Glen Ross, Braveheart, The Sixth Sense, etc.

MG: How did you end up as the Sprint Zombie for their commercials?
MPD: It was a pretty standard commercial audition process, just like any other. I got lucky with this one, in that they ran it so much, and it was actually a funny spot that I was really pleased with. The director said that one the reasons they hired me was because they like the way I added the “cool, cool cool cool…” in the audition, so I guess that’s something.

MG: What else do you have planned for 2014?
MPD: I’m going to be releasing an album of some of my songs that can be found on my YouTube page. I’ll be writing more songs and musicals. I’m hoping to take my one man show to the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in NYC — it’s called, “Matt Davis Gets A Girlfriend:” A One Man Musical about One Man’s quest to not DIE ALONE. Also, I’ll be doing the revival/reboot of the musical Side Show at the Kennedy Center in DC in June and July, having just done it at the La Jolla Playhouse.

Patrick Duffy and Jesse Metcalf gives a sneak into TNT’s “Dallas”

This summer TNT is reinventing the classic TV series “Dallas” and bringing back to TV. It is bringing a mix of original and new characters. Patrick Duffy is returning to his role, along with new co-star Jesse Metcalf. “Dallas” premiers Wednesday, June 13th at 9:00 p.m. Eastern on TNT. Media Mikes had a chance to ask the guys a few questions about what we can expect from the new 2012 “Dallas”.

Mike Smith: How do you feel that the new version of “Dallas” differs and how is it similar?
Jesse Metcalf: Okay. Well, I don’t think we’ve changed what made the original series great.I mean the show still centers around the major themes of family dynamics, greed, loyalty, love, and betrayal. But we’ve just updated it. We made it modern and definitely socially relevant to the times. And in addition to that we added some new characters. Obviously, Christopher and John Ross were established in the original series. But, now you now get to see the type of man that these two children have grown up to be. We also introduced the character of Elena Ramos, who is the one side of the love triangle between, Josh Henderson and Jordana. She’s the daughter of our…
Patrick Duffy: The Ewing housekeeper…
JM: Yeah, the Ewing housekeeper. She definitely wasn’t a part of the original series. Then we also have my fiancé, Rebecca Sutter played by Julie Gonzalo. It’s a great marriage of the original show and the original cast and some new cast members.
PD: Yeah. The difference also is just technologically speaking television is done so differently now that if we tried to duplicate the old school “Dallas” I think it would be slow in appearance and in substance for a modern audience. So with the technology that we have with high def cameras and the new way of directing television, which is so dynamic and so intense in terms of the pacing. And the scripts reflect that also. They’re much more condensed. We get maybe four or five episodes of an old “Dallas” in one episode of the new “Dallas”. So all of these things I think contemporize the old show. But we maintain the honor that Cynthia Cidre and Mike Robin feel towards the show. So that hasn’t changed. And I think that’s what will impress old viewers as they look at the new Dallas is it’s so much similar to what they were used to. But it’s done for a contemporary audience. So we think we got the best of both worlds. And we’re hoping that everybody out there is going to agree with us.

MS: So Patrick, what was it like to hear the news that they were recreating the show? And did you ever see it coming back as a series?
PD: No, because I didn’t think that anybody knew how to do it as a series again. The real brains and heart behind the show is our executive producer, Leonard Cassman. And he died. All of these other attempts to write scripts and to promote a movie or a television show that fell so far short of what the original concept was. I didn’t think anybody had the ability anymore. Then Cynthia Cidre wrote a script and it was submitted to Larry and Linda and myself. And it was phenomenal. The pilot script for the show had everything even better than I would say half of the original “Dallas” scripts that we got. So from the moment, the three of us read it we were onboard. And it was the first time I ever thought it was a possibility of returning as a series. And we filmed the pilot. I was sure that we were going to series. I was sure we were going to do this show. I’m still as optimistic that it’s going to go for years and years, because the quality of it is so satisfying having done the show for 13 years to see how well it can be redone again in 2012. I would be more than happy if this were my swan song.

MS: Do each of you have a favorite scene that you’ve done or favorite moment from the first few episodes that you could each talk about?
JM: I probably have a favorite moment from every episode. It’s really difficult for me to pick just one scene. I mean the fun thing about this show is that it’s a magnificent ensemble. Every single day you get to work with a different actor. I love working with all these different actors on the show for different reasons. But I’d say from the pilot episode my favorite scene would have to be the scene where Christopher confronts Elena about possibly betraying him and about the email. Patrick and I have had a number of really strong scenes
PD: Yeah.
JM: What do you think, Patrick?
PD: Well it’s interesting to me, because several of my favorite scenes didn’t make it to the show. That’s what’s interesting is that these scripts are so compact and so intense every scene is so brilliantly done. You finish filming and you think I can’t wait to see that. And then it’s edited out. Well because, you just can’t put everything in each episode. I am sure it still exists somewhere; especially when it comes out on a DVD there will be, additional scenes as an ancillary side to the DVD. You have to as an actor let that go. But I had a scene with Jesse in a barn, which they only kept the lead in scene for that. And they eliminated it. And it was one of my favorite ones of that episode. But over the years I’ve learned to let those feelings go and just enjoy what I see. Most of my new scenes that I have with my wife, with Brenda Strong, are really satisfying, that to me is the big test to find someone who would be the new Mrs. Bobby Ewing is a tough decision that casting had to make. It was a tough role for somebody to accept and Brenda is so good and I feel like when I watch us on camera anymore that we’ve been married for 20 years. There’s just an ease that we have with each other that makes those particular scenes very enjoyable for me. And I like being a father. So every time I work with Jesse it’s another level of satisfaction.

MS: Jesse, what really made you want to be apart of this show?
JM: It was the writing. The pilot episode was the initial script that I read. To be honest, I think this probably speaks to our critics a bit.
I was a bit hesitant to even audition for the new “Dallas”, because I wasn’t sure of remaking such an iconic show was a good idea. With the wave of remakes and reboots of various different shows over the past five years, it’s really been a trend. Most of which weren’t very successful, I was definitely hesitant. But after reading that pilot episode I was like, wow, this is really good story telling. The characters are really well defined and complex. I was like, wow, I think I want to throw my hat in the ring. Initially I auditioned for the role of John Ross. There was some interest there. But they ended up going with Josh Henderson, who I think is perfect casting for the role. And they came back for Christopher and I was even more excited for that role. Then I think the thing that really pushed it over the top for me was that Larry, Patrick, and Linda were going to be a part of the new series, which I think is completely necessary.

MS: Patrick, what do you think it is about the show that really captures so many viewers?
PD: Well, Jesse nailed it because we’ve been approached over the years both to be in a show or how do we feel about, you know, redoing “Dallas” or movie versions that didn’t even involve the original cast members and they all fell so far short…even approaching the original show that I didn’t think it was possible to do. And as Jesse said, once I saw the script and Larry and Linda saw the script and read it we realized not only was it possible but it could end up being better than the original because of the timely nature of how the scripts were written and what we could do with technology now. So the three of us got onboard, and I’ve not been disappointed in a page, a paragraph, or anything since the original pilot episode. So I’m onboard as long as they can squeeze another year out of this old horse.

Philip Klein talks about his book “Lost at Sea: The Hunt for Patrick McDermott”

To most of us, our idea of a private investigator is based on watching such television shows as “The Rockford Files” and “Magnum P.I.” Smooth guys who were able to blend in even though they were the best looking guys in the room. And, in Magnum’s case, they were wearing a loud Hawaiian shirt! Philip Kline has managed to “blend in” for almost three decades. And that’s saying a lot about a man who stands 6’5” tall!

Internationally renowned for his investigative skills, as well as providing protection for some of the country’s biggest celebrities and politicians, Kline and his team undertook a project brought to them by “Dateline: NBC.” The network was curious about the mysterious disappearance of Patrick Kim McDermott, whose claim to fame was being the boyfriend of singer Olivia Newton John. Declared dead by the Coast Guard, as well as investigators hired by Newton John, something in the case file raised a red flag in Mr. Klein.

Klein has authored and just released the book “LOST AT SEA: The Hunt for Patrick McDermott.” In it he recounts the many hours, days and even years it took him to find a man who didn’t want to be found. Mr. Klein recently took the time to speak with MediaMikes about the case.

Mike Smith: How did this case compare to others you’ve had in the past?
Philip Klein: Well you know I do a lot of investigative work and body guard work for some of the most influential people in the United States. I’ve got to tell you, when NBC approached me about this I was kind of skeptical at first. But it turned out to be a real “who done it.” Actually more of a “why did they do it.” It wasn’t really “who” did it because we know…it was the man who was missing. But it was “why” he did it. Most investigators will tell you that the motive is the most important thing of the case. And when we found the motive of this case everything pretty much fell into place pretty quickly.

MS: Since the book has been published have you been contacted by McDermott or any representative? (NOTE: In the book Mr. Klein tracks McDermott to Mexico, where he later negotiates with a representative of Mr. McDermotts )
PK: No we haven’t. And the reason why is that we made a promise that if he provided a DNA sample…what we refer to as “proof of life,” we wouldn’t bother him anymore. His position, through his legal counsel, is that he just wants to be left alone. He has not committed any crimes, there are no warrants for his arrest and there are no, what we call in the business BOLOs, be on the lookout for in his name. So what we did was take a step back and decided that we needed to end the case. We asked his rep to send us a proof of life and we got just that.

MS: I remember in the book that you had agreed to not bother him once the proof of life was provided. I was just curious if maybe you had gotten a phone call or email saying “you were right…that’s exactly what happened!”
PK: (laughs) No, it doesn’t work like that. As much as I’d like it to work like that. I think what happens in the real world is that he is expecting an onslaught of press because the book has been released. And because he’s expecting an onslaught of press he’s probably gone back under. He’s very good. He’s learned the system down in Mexico. He knows how to disappear. He knows how to blend in. That’s what he’s probably done at this point. If I was consulting with him I would tell him that’s what he needs to do at this point.

MS: There almost seemed, not on your part but on your team, to talk directly with Olivia Newton John. Was that an outlet you really wanted to investigate but just didn’t feel it was right?
PK: Well, not necessarily. Well, you may be right in some ways. In every case there is a victim and in this case we considered Olivia Newton John one of the victims. Do we believe that Olivia Newton John knew anything about his disappearance? No. We believe that Patrick McDermott…we know that Patrick McDermott…went to her two weeks before he disappeared. He gave her some flowers and a funny card and said goodbye. They were going to break up. Olivia’s idea of the break up was…she felt that it was going to be a temporary break up. He’d done this before. In the police reports she called it a small “time out.” We believe that McDermott made the decision that that was it. He was going down to Mexico so he said his goodbyes. It’s very unusual that when someone takes off like that they say goodbye to the things they love or that they know that are common to them. And I think in Patrick’s case that he did have fond feelings for Olivia. You don’t date somebody for that long and not have some kind of feelings for them. But in the end I don’t think he wanted to hurt her. He just wanted to go on with his life. Of course Hollywood is a very, very tough place to survive. And I believe he decided he just couldn’t do it anymore. Especially in the fast lane with an “A” list star. He was always the nice looking man on Olivia Newton John’s arm. And so I think he said goodbye to her in the way he knew how to say goodbye. He bought a gun. He emptied his bank accounts down to zero. He got as much money as he could off his credit cards and he took off.

MS: Has the popularity, and the easy access of, the Internet made your job easier or harder? There is so much information out there that often you don’t know what’s true and what’s not.
PK: We have a big sign in our office for all of our investigators to read. It says “Don’t Believe What You Read on the Internet!” The Internet is a great tool, especially for investigators like us. That is one of the things we were able to do, use the Internet. We created what they call a “spider” web site…a trap site…where we could watch the IP addresses come in. One of the things you learn very quickly is that when people are running or trying to hide they’re always looking over their shoulder. So we used that concept and created the website “Find Patrick McDermott.com” We set that up as a “spider” site and we were able to trap IP addresses. We released the web site only to relatives and close friends of McDermott, including the Olivia Newton John camp. Then we sat back and watched. We blocked it from Google. We blocked it from Yahoo. And we just watched it for two weeks. And, sure enough, we started getting hits from Mexico. There’s nobody in Mexico that knew we were doing anything. So we figured at that point that he was down in Mexico. And we also knew the bigger piece of the puzzle…somebody was communicating with him down in Mexico.

MS: Do you know the status of McDermott’s life insurance policy?
PK: The insurance policy was not honored because of our report. We do know that Ms. Nipar (NOTE: Yvette Nipar was Patrick McDermott’s former wife. Despite her claims otherwise she has tried to undermine Mr. Klein’s investigation almost from the beginning. She has even gone so far to write Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon.com, a letter asking him not to sell Mr. Klein’s book) was paying the insurance policy and keeping it active. It was a $100,000 life insurance policy. Of course the insurance company has a policy of not releasing any pertinent information except to family members. However when we did send them a formal 1702 notice, a notice saying we wanted to know who was paying the insurance policy and if the policy was active, they did copy Yvette Nipar. I think that was their way of saying, “no, we’re not going to tell you who’s paying on the policy but we’re going to copy our letter to whoever is paying on the policy.” That’s where we got that connection.

MS: I know from your emails with Ms. Nipar regarding your request to test your DNA sample with a sample of her son she refused and told you that the Coast Guard had samples of Mr. McDermott’s DNA. Did they?
PK: We did. And the U.S. Coast Guard advised us that they did not have any DNA. They didn’t understand where she was getting that information from. There was a hat found on the boat. There was also some other items found…fishing tackle, a wallet which was empty…what was missing were his two passports. So we asked them directly “what about this green hat that was supposedly left behind, was there any DNA on it or did you find any DNA in his apartment when you did the search?” There answer was “no, we did not keep any DNA. There was no reason for us to keep any DNA.” That’s always been a confusing thing for us…that the Coast Guard did not keep any DNA. The Los Angeles Police Department had immediately dropped the case. They felt, number one, that there was no foul play. Number two, it wasn’t there jurisdiction. And number three, they felt that he was probably running due to his issues with Ms. Nipar and the amount of money he owed the state of California for child support.

MS: I just pulled up the book’s web site and I see the letter she wrote Jeff Bezos asking him to pull the book.
PK: We were surprised. If you go through that letter you will see that Ms. Nipar results to name calling…she resorts to intimidation. And if you read the book you will notice that this is the same behavior she showed when we were trying to investigate. You’ll also see that she tried to use the Los Angeles Police Department to shut the investigation down. This is atypical of someone that really wants to know what happened to their loved one. It’s totally the opposite of what we’re used to as investigators. Usually when we come in and investigate the family bends over backwards. They give interviews…they say, “look, this is what we know…this is what we have.” They want to share. She has done completely the opposite. In fact, she has attempted to block the investigation at every turn. And once again, when we start talking about the case in the form of a book she begins to start trying to block it again. So all of the investigators in this office raise our eyebrows, as do some of my friends over at the Los Angeles Police Department. They raise their eyebrows and say she’s acting quite abnormal.

MS: One thing that really struck me in the book was when you relate that your father told you the three important things in life: Truth, Honesty and Faith. You then add that there is a difference between truth and honesty. What is that difference?
PK: Well, if I’m putting my investigator hat on, truth and honesty are two different things. You can say the sky is blue, and that’s the truth. But, honestly, if you’re looking at the sky and the sky has clouds in it, you don’t want to just say the sky is blue. Honesty means the sky is blue with some clouds. And I think that sometimes people, when they are scared or trying to give only the half-truth, they’ll stand up and just say the sky is blue. When they perfectly know that it’s blue and white. It’s blue with white clouds. They hold things back. And I saw a lot of that on this case. I’d get the typical Hollywood “yeah, I knew Pat…this is the way he was.” But they’d hold stuff back. And I think people in Hollywood are so shell shocked by the media…so shell shocked by the press and how hungry the press is to get a story…that they sometimes hold things back. Or, if they have something to hide, they hold things back. I think that’s what I was talking about when I mentioned that with my father. There is a huge difference between truth and honesty. The honesty is that the sky is blue with beautiful white clouds. It’s not just blue.

MS: Now that he’s 19 years old, if Chance (Mr. McDermott’s son)were to come to you and say, “Phil, can you show me what you’ve got,” would you share it with him?
PK: You know, that’s a great question! Not only with this case, which is a missing persons case. I do about 100 missing person cases a year. And I can tell you this. For each of the families I always keep what we call “the Box.” It’s the case box. Sometimes there are five or six boxes and sometimes only one box. And I keep them for the family members. Especially the young people so they can go through them when they turn 18 years old. And if Chance McDermott wants to come to our office and if he wants to sit down and dig through all of the evidence…read everything that we did, all the way back to day one when we started with NBC to when we closed with NBC to the writings of the attorneys down in Mexico City…he is perfectly welcome with open arms. And you’d be surprised. Young people come to us often and say, “you know, our parents didn’t really tell us everything Mr. Klein…would you please sit down with me and tell me what this is and show me the documents?” And we show them. We have seen it as a very emotional event…as a very spiritual event. And a very relieving event for these folks. With this case…and I’m NOT calling Ms. Nipar a liar…I’m simply saying that Ms. Nipar is holding stuff back from her son. There’s a reason and a motive for that. Maybe someday she can look him in the eye and tell him that motive.

 

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Book Review “The Klein Files: Lost at Sea – The Hunt For Patrick McDermott”

Author: Philip R. Klein
Paperback: 343 pages
Publisher: Klein Publishing
Release date: January 23, 2012

Our Score: 4 out of 5 stars

If I asked you about the “Patrick McDermott Case” you might not recognize what I was talking about. But if I added “Olivia Newton John”s missing boyfriend” before the name you’d certainly understand.

In the summer of 2005, while on an overnight fishing trip, Patrick McDermott vanished. A quick and hasty search by the Coast Guard, as well as investigation “experts” on land, concluded that he must have fallen overboard and drowned.

In the search for the ever popular ratings, the television program “Dateline N.B.C.” contacted famed investigator Philip Klein and asked him if he would take one of two cases they had been following. Intrigued by the celebrity aspect, and the fact that nothing seemed kosher in the information presented to him, Klein took the McDermott case. For over two years he and his team interviewed witnesses, checked alibis and investigated leads previously dismissed. And they got their man!

A true storyteller (I would love to just sit down at a table with Mr. Klein and hear some of his exploits), Klein begins the book in the middle of a harrowing plane ride. With his wife, Inga, he is escorting a suspected kidnapper and the young child she abducted back to Texas. Approaching the runway at 200 MPH the front landing gear fail to lock, causing the plane to skid. Cool heads prevail, thankfully, and everyone gets off safely. But those few minutes inside the plane are riveting. Once Klein accepts the case he and his team begin to systematically follow the clues. And there are many. Most of them point to McDermott’s horrid ex-wife, described by anyone that would talk about her as a bitch. And that was the polite word. As the case progresses Klein and his team literally travel the globe, setting traps and beating bushes. Taking advantage of the world wide web they set up a “spider” web site, one that captures the IP address of everyone that visits it. They also set up a public web site which, within 48 hours of the first “Dateline N.B.C.’ show airing, crashes 39 times and gets over 2 million hits!

While Klein is the lead investigator he also praises his “team,” from his office workers to his field men. And to Inga! It’s clear that she is the force which guides him, both personally and professionally, and his words of appreciation ring true.

If you’ve ever wanted to get inside a missing person case…and I mean INSIDE…then “Lost At Sea” is a fine entrance.

Interview with Patrick Muldoon

Patrick Muldoon is known best for his roles in the original “Melrose Place” and “Starship Troopers”. Patrick currently returned to his role on the soap opera “Days of Our Lives” after a 16 year break. Media Mikes had a chance to chat about his return to soaps and also his connection to Casper Van Dian.

Mike Gencarelli: How has it been returning “Days of Our Lives” after a 16 year break?
Patrick Muldoon: I kind of compare it to what it would be like if you went back to high school 15 years later and all of the same people are there. It’s almost like a family reunion. The halls and dressing rooms are still the same. It was really bizarre in the beginning but there was still that feeling like I never left. I am loving it!

MG: What would you say is the most challenging aspect of working in soaps?
PM: It’s much different. I have been used to working with just one camera. It’s taken some getting used to again. There is a lot of memorization happening. A movie you get four months to work on your lines and memorize them but on soaps you only get one day. Everyone works really hard and we all do our best. It really has the feel of a theater company and a live show

MG: Was it hard picking up the character of Austin Reed after so long?
PM: With soap operas they write the character and as it progresses they write in aspects of the actor playing the role. They did that for me originally so I am really familiar with this character. I played Austin for 3 years which is the longest role I have ever played. It’s weird how emotionally everything reattaches.

MG: You have done TV and movies, what do you look for more in a role or character?
PM: I tend to look at things backwards. When you get a part there is something going on within that character. There is a question that the character is living at that time. There is probably something you need to look at from your own personal life. As things come to you I kind of look at it on a spiritual tip a little bit. Whatever obstacle that character has to face somehow I am being asked to look at that in my own life. In order to be able to play the part you have to look at it from your own life. That is generally what I pay attention to when a part comes across the desk.

MG: You recently reunited with your “Starship Troopers” co-star Casper Van Dien on “Born to Ride”, tell us about that project?
PM: That film actually just got released last year however it was shot almost 7 years ago. It may have been longer than that. I don’t know what exactly happened with the film being tied up for so long. Casper and I are great friends. Neither one of us knew how to ride a motorcycle when we started shooting that. I started out doing circles in a parking lot and then I was going 70 miles an hour down a road. It was such a rush. By the grace of god we got out of that movie alive as neither of knew how to ride.

MG: You starred in 2007’s “Ice Spiders” and you got “Spider 3D” coming up, what can you tell us about that?
PM: I’m not sure why spider science fiction movies find me. (Laughs) We shot “Spiders 3D” in Bulgaria last year. It is really cutting edge technology. This was a role where you either had to hire Casper or myself. I got this one.

MG: Do you find that working on creature films pose any difficulties to CG effects added later?
PM: It’s all fun. It’s like when you see kids in playgrounds shooting each other with sticks. We are just doing the same thing but we are in out 40’s. It’s fun for me. I have been an athlete all my life so when I get to do the action stuff I am very happy.

MG: What else do you have stirring for 2012?
PM: It’s mainly just “Days of Our Lives”. I also am a musician and I will be going to Nashville on one of my breaks from the show to record a solo record. It’s going to have a southern rock vibe to it however it’s still a little early to be talking about that just yet.

Interview with Ian Patrick Williams

Ian Patrick Williams started his career working on the film “Re-Animator”. From there he was thrust into the world of sci-fi/horror starring in films like “TerrorVision”, “Dolls”, “Bad Channels”, King of the Ants, and most recently “Growth”.  Movie Mikes had a chance to chat with Ian about his films and what he has planned upcoming.

Mike Gencarelli: How did you start your film career off?
Ian Patrick Williams: While working as a stage actor in Chicago, I did my first film for director Andy Davis called “Stony Island”.  I don’t think it was ever released, but Andy went on to direct a lot of major films including “The Fugitive”.  Then Stuart Gordon directed a play we co-authored called “Bleacher Bums” for PBS-TV for which we (the cast and co-authors) were given the Chicago Emmy award.  After moving to L.A. in 1980, I worked mostly in TV until doing “Re-Animator” with Stuart in ’83.

MG: Tell us about working on the film “Dolls”.  Can you recall your experience?
IPW: The best way to learn about “Dolls” is to listen to the commentary track that Carolyn, Stephen, Carrie and I did a few years ago.  I had been in Rome the year before shooting “Terror Vision” with Ted Nicholau so I already knew my way around the city.  We shot on a small studio built by Dino DiLaurentis just outside of Rome.  What most people don’t realize is that the entire house was actually a set built inside one of the sound stages!

MG: What was your biggest challenge working on the film?
IPW: I suppose the only challenge was that with such a small cast, there was very little time off  – we were all working pretty much every day.  Fortunately, I had spent so many years doing theater with Stuart and Carolyn that we had an automatic shorthand together and didn’t need very much rehearsal.

MG: You have worked a few times with Stuart Gordon on films like “Robot Jox” & “King of the Ants”.  Tell us about how you started that.
IPW: Stuart had started directing theater in Madison Wisconsin when he was in college; he then moved to Chicago and started the Organic Theater Company with Carolyn and then-unknown Chicago actors Joe Mantegna, Dennis Franz and Meshach Taylor.  He first hired me to do a production of “Rashomon” at an open air theater on the University of Chicago campus; a few months later he invited me to go on a European tour with the company.  We’ve worked together on and off ever since.

MG: You worked on an episode “Freddy‘s Nightmares”.  Tell us about that show.
IPW: It was a treat to work with both Tobe Hooper and Bob Englund.  Because it was the pilot episode, there was a fair amount of chaos as the network and producers were haggling over exactly how the show should look.  As a result, we frequently worked 14 hour days.  Because of union turn-around rules, we couldn’t start up again for another 12 hours.  So on day 1, we’d have a 6:00 AM call and get home after dark.  By the time the work week was over, we were getting home at dawn and called at 6:00 PM to work all night!  But it was worth it to be known as the guy who ‘killed’ Freddy Kruger.

MG: Tell us about playing the ‘evil villain’ in the recent film “Growth”.
IPW: I had done a table read for the director and producers playing a different character.  But by the time production began, they had done a re-write and that character was omitted.  The role of Mason was cast with an older actor; but for some reason, he had to drop out two days before his scenes were to be shot.  They made a frantic call to my agent asking if I could fly to Martha’s Vineyard and take over the role on a moment’s notice.  It took about an hour in the makeup chair every day making me look like I was 70 or 80 years old, depending on the scene.  I think the special effects are quite good for a low budget film, which should give confidence to all first time directors without a lot of money.

MG: Do you enjoy working more in television or in film?
IPW: The process is pretty much the same.  TV is usually a little faster because they have to shoot an hour long episodic in seven working days.  A bigger budgeted film can take months to shoot, which can actually become pretty boring.  I shot a small role in a “Spider-Man” parody called “Superhero: The Movie”, produced by the Weinstein brothers in 2008.  There were several days when I sat in my trailer for 10 hours, only to be told they weren’t going to get to me that day.  I’d much rather be on a lower budgeted film if it means I’m working all the time.

MG: Tell us about what you are working on upcoming.
IPW: I’ve acted in a few more low budget films: “Dire Wolf”, “Action Hero” and “Simon Says”, but I have no idea when they’ll be distributed.  I’ve recently gone back to my first love: theater.  In recent months, I’ve performed in the plays “Lucia Mad”, “Puzzlers” and “Judgement at Nuremburg”, all in the L.A. area.  As far as future film or TV roles, like all actors I’ll just have to wait and see.

 

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Interview with Sean Patrick Flanery

Sean Patrick Flanery is known best for his role of Connor MacManus in “The Boondock Saints” series.  Sean starred last year in “Saw 3D: The Final Chapter” and also the recently released “InSight”.  Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Sean about his new film “insight” and his reflection the “The Boondock Saints” craze.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us about how you became involved with your latest film “InSight”?
Sean Patrick Flanery: Richard Gabai, the director sent me the script. I liked it and that was pretty much all she wrote. I mean it was good script. I liked him and we decided to go forward with it.

MG: How do you prepare for a role once you come on board a film?
SPF: It depends on the film really. Somethings are so perfectly written that all your preparation is set for you. I am the least method cat you will ever meet. My preparation takes place between the title page and fade out. I am not one of those cats that believe that I have to go live in gutter for a week to play a homeless man. I do not believe that, nope. Unless you are in a situation where you are playing an equestrian, then obviously you will need to be able to ride a horse…so specific things like that. For character works, I think all the information is provided in the script itself.

MG: You seemed to have good chemistry on screen with Natalie Zea, how was it working with her?
SPF: It was cool. She is a real sweetheart. She is a professional and very talented. I had a good time.

MG: Tell us about the production, where was it shot?
SPF: We shot it in L.A. but it was in some weird parts man. We shot in part of L.A. that literally you have no idea that you are in L.A. Some places I didn’t even know existed man [laughs]. It was cool as far as that goes.

MG: I hear it was shot in only 16 days was that rushed at all for you?
SPF: Yeah it was 16 day shoot. If everyone comes to work prepared than that is ample time to shoot a film. Barring any weird special effects shots or crowd scenes of a thousand, that is plenty of time to shoot a material character driven film.

MG: You recently went back to “The Young and the Restless”, do you enjoy working on soaps and switching it up?
SPF: I enjoy switching it up like that. It was a medium I had never explored before. It is a different kind of break.

MG: Can you reflect on the fans reactions and supports to “The Boondock Saints” series?
SPF: I’m truly in awe of their support. Having said that, I would be a fan myself
had I not been it the film as it suits my sensibilities.

MG: How was it returning to play Connor MacManus in “The Boondock Saints II: All
Saints Day”? Any plans for a another installment?
SPF: We didn’t miss a beat & it was great to be back filming with good friends. I hope so. They are a ball to make.

MG: How did you get involved with working on “Saw 3D: The Final Chapter” and was it a difficult shoot?
SPF: I read the script and really liked the character. It was no more so than any other stunts I have done. It went fairly smoothly.

MG: Tell us about working with director on “Scavengers” and “Mission Park”?
SPF: Working with Travis Zariwny was killer man…really killer. I had a great time working with that guy on that film. “Mission Park” just wrapped this week. My part was already completed. It was killer, I really had a wonderful time on that film also.

http://www.hollywoodbjj.com
http://www.seanflanery.com

Interview with Patrick Fischler

Patrick Fischler is known for his roles in “Mad Men” and “Lost”. Patrick just recently co-starred on “Curb Your Enthusiasm” with his wife Lauren Bowles. He is also co-starring in Kevin Smith’s latest film “Red State”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Patrick about his roles and what he has planned next.

Mike Gencarelli: How was it working with your wife, Lauren Bowen in the recent episode of “Curb Your Enthusiasm”?
Patrick Fischler: It was awesome! We have known each other for 20 years, as we went to college together. We worked together in theater and we were both in “Ghost World” even though we didn’t act together. We also did a couple episodes of “Veronica Mars” but this was the first time that we got to play a married couple and it was a complete blast!

MG: Tell us about working with Kevin Smith on “Red State” which is coming out in October?
PF: It was phenomenal. Kevin is a super great guy and really fun to work with. I just can’t say enough good things about Kevin. I was really excited to be a part of the film as I have been a fan of Kevin’s for awhile. The movie is going to freak some people out and probably piss off a few others but I think all good entertainment does that. I think good entertainment should touch all emotions.

MG: What can you tell us about your role on “Atlas Shrugged: Part 1”?
PF: There’s not too much I can talk about that other than it has been released and it was an enjoyable project. Paul Johansson who directed the project is a really nice guy and there was also a really good group of actors on the project as well. Most of my stuff was with Grant Bowler who played the lead and he was just a great guy and a fantastic actor.

MG: What can you tell us about appearing on “Franklin & Bash”?
PF: That’s a fun group of people who like to have a good time. The episode I appeared on also had Jason Alexander on and he is just great to work with. The best thing I can say about that show is that they are all having a great time and I think it shows when you watch it.

MG: What can you tell us about working on “Dinner for Schmucks”?
PF: That was fun. I did a lot of training with that bird and there is actually a scene that didn’t make the movie where I do whole act with the bird. It was a bummer it didn’t make it in to the movie. It was really great and fun watching amazing comedian’s improv and say great dialogue. I got to watch that every day for weeks and it was just great.

MG: Can you tell us about some of your other projects?
PF: I have “Red State” coming out in October and then in January I have one coming out with Katherine Heigl called “One for the Money”. This film is based on a group of books by author Janet Evanovich. I play Katherine’s sleazy cousin who she comes to work for at the bail bonds business my character runs. That was an amazing experience and I hope people go out and see the film. I just finished shooting a film called “Big Sur” which is a film adaptation of a Jack Kerouac book. The film starts Kate Bosworth and Josh Lucas. The film was one of the greatest experiences I have ever had. We shot for five weeks in Big Sur outside of San Francisco and we are hoping to take the film to Sundance this year. The cast was just incredible!

 

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