“Manchester by the Sea” Dominates 4th Annual MediaMikes.com Awards

Writer/Director Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea” led all films in the 4th Annual Media Mikes Awards, which are voted on by both readers and staff of the web site.

Besides being named the Best Film of 2016, “Manchester by the Sea” took home the awards for Best Actor, Casey Affleck, as well as Best Original Screenplay for Lonergan. It was also the only film to win multiple awards.

Best Actress went to Natalie Portman for her performance as former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy in “Jackie.” Best Supporting Actor was Dev Patel for “Lion” while Viola Davis was selected as the year’s Best Supporting Actress for “Fences.”

Damien Chazelle was named the year’s Best Director for “La La Land” while “Zootopia” was chosen as the Best Animated Feature.

As in past years, over 3,000 entries were submitted by readers in seven categories, with the staff of Media Mikes choosing the winners in the Original and Adapted Screenplay, Original Musical Score and Documentary categories.

Below is a complete list of winners:

BEST FILM: Manchester by the Sea

BEST ACTOR: Casey Affleck – Manchester by the Sea

BEST ACTRESS: Natalie Portman – Jackie

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Dev Patel – Lion

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Viola Davis – Fences

BEST DIRECTOR: Damien Chazelle – La La Land

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE: Zootopia

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY: Kenneth Lonergan – Manchester by the Sea

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY: Jay Cocks and Martin Scorcese – Silence

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE: OJ: Made in America

BEST ORIGINAL MUSICAL SCORE: Mark Mancina – Moana

Film Review: “Jackie”

Starring: Natalie Portman, Peter Sarsgaard and Billy Crudup
Directed by: Pablo Larrain
Rated: R
Running time: 1 hr 40 mins
Fox Searchlight

Our Score: 3 out of 5 Stars

I am a Kennedy buff. Born in 1960, I was raised in a family that regarded the Kennedy family in the same way the British regard the Royal Family. I’m too young to remember JFK – though my father once wrote a poem where he noted that I was an angry child because one of my favorite kids programs had been preempted by a speech from the President. My mother woke me up in the wee hours of the morning when Bobby Kennedy was shot. As a 20 year old I worked for Ted Kennedy’s presidential campaign. I’ve studied the family as much as I could. When Jacqueline Kennedy passed away in May 1994 a funny thought went through my mind. I had never heard her speak. Every time I saw footage of her, she was either running from the press or, earlier in her life, smiling quietly. It wasn’t until the era of YouTube, when a television special about the White House that Mrs. Kennedy hosted was uploaded, that I finally heard her speak. Soft and quiet, like the coo of a dove. And that is the voice that drives the new film “Jackie.”

“Jackie” is two very different looks at the former First Lady. First is the young, vibrant Jackie. Freshly moved into the White House, she has angered some in the country by remodeling. To show the people what she did, she agrees to host a television special, giving many in the country their first look inside “the people’s house.” The second look is that of an angry widow, just a week after the assassination of her husband, trying to figure out how to make sure her martyred husband’s legacy will live on. This is the more dramatic Jackie and this is where “Jackie” works best.

It’s been six years since Natalie Portman won the Best Actress Oscar for “Black Swan.” Since then, with the exception of a couple of Marvel movies she hasn’t really been showing up in mainstream films. Here she returns with a vengeance. She captures every facet of Jacqueline Kennedy. The smiling, laughing young woman and the embittered widow, refusing to change out of her clothes, stained with her husband’s blood, because she “wants them to see what they’ve done.” Again, it’s the second persona, one who agrees to speak with a reporter to describe her feelings and to conjure the image of Camelot, that holds your attention.

Portman is surrounded by a good supporting cast, including Greta Gerwig as White House Social Secretary Nancy Tuckerman, Crudup as the reporter who knows all along that he will never be permitted to print most of his interview and Danish actor Caspar Phillipson, who bears an amazing resemblance to the late President Kennedy. Sarsgaard is adequate as RFK, but the fact that he doesn’t even attempt a New England accent is annoyingly noticeable.

But Portman is the story here. Go check her out before she disappears for another six years.

Enter to win a Blu-ray of Jackie Chan’s “Police Story: Lockdown”

To celebrate the Blu-ray release of Jackie Chan’s “Police Story: Lockdown”. Media Mikes would like to give our fans a chance to win one of three Blu-ray’s of the film. If you want to win this great prize, please leave us a comment below or send us an email with your favorite Jackie Chan film. This giveaway will remain open until August 28th at Noon, Eastern Time. This is open to our readers in US and Canada only. One entry per person, per household. All other entries will be considered invalid. Media Mikes will randomly select winners. Winners will be alerted via email.

Police Captain Zhong Wen (Jackie Chan) knows all about sacrifice. He s always been too busy chasing bad guys to be a father to his daughter Miao (Jing Tian). Tonight, he s seeing her for the first time in years and meeting her fiance, club owner Wu Jiang (Liu Ye). But Wu knows Zhong. And his plans for the evening include taking Miao, Zhong, and the entire club hostage. Zhong knows about sacrifice. What will he give up to save his daughter?

Jackie Robinson Returns to Kansas City – Hollywood Style!

KC Royals Hall of Famer George Brett

My first memory of Jackie Robinson is also one of my earliest baseball memories. Watching game 2 of the 1972 baseball World Series there was a ceremony held before the game, commemorating the 25th Anniversary of Robinson becoming the first black baseball player in the major leagues. Assuming that black players had always been around (heck, I was wearing a pair of Lou Brock model Converse sneakers that I had begged my parents for) I was surprised at the story my father told me about Robinson and his battle to play in the majors. Before signing a contract with the Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League Robinson was the shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro Leagues. So it was only fitting that “42,” the motion picture that honors his life, premiere in Kansas City. The event, held at the AMC Barrywoods 24 theater, gave almost 1,400 fans the first opportunity to see the new film.

Linda Paige, daughter of Satchel Paige

The weather was as brisk as you would expect on an early April day. Dignitaries, including Kansas City mayor Sly James, mingled with past and current members of the Kansas City Royals, as well as other baseball greats from the past, including Hall of Famer Lou Brock! Also attending was Linda Paige, the daughter of Hall of Fame pitcher Satchel Paige as well as Jackie Robinson’s son, David. Bob Kendrick, the president of the Negro League Baseball Museum, which is also based in Kansas City, attended as did cast members from “42,” including Harrison Ford, Derek Phillips, Chadwick Boseman and Andre Holland.

Hall of Fame third baseman George Brett was amazed at the red carpet experience and the honoring of Jackie Robinson. “Being a baseball player also, people just assume that I know who Jackie was. But I don’t know all of the things he had to endure. It’s going to be an education for me tonight to watch this (film).” I asked Brett, who is a strong supporter of the Negro League Museum, what the benefit showing would do for the organization. “I hope it brings more awareness to it,” he said. Brett’s said his biggest regret was that Buck O’Neil, one of the best known former Negro League ballplayers, was no longer alive to enjoy this moment. Featured in the highly popular Ken Burns documentary “Baseball,” O’Neil was the first black coach in Major League baseball and a fan favorite. Brett also noted that if O’Neil were still alive tonight’s event would have been twice as big!

David Robinson, Jackie Robinson’s son

Best known for his work on television’s “Friday Night Lights,” Phillips talked about playing a different sport on screen. “I probably hadn’t played baseball since I was seventeen and to get the opportunity to do a film like this at thirty-five…to get out there and throw the ball around…was a great experience. We had a run-down scene that we shot in multiple angles…chasing the runner to third and back to second then back to third. It was 106 degrees in Atlanta and I got a little gassed, I’ve got to be honest.”

I asked Mayor James how important it was that this event was being held in Kansas City. “It’s huge,” he replied. “And it’s the appropriate place to have it when you think about it. But for the Negro Leagues there wouldn’t be a Jackie Robinson. The Negro Leagues started here…the Monarchs were a great team and Jackie was a part of that team. He was the person that was selected. He not only broke the color barrier in baseball but he also broke the color barrier in society. He was a high-profile African-American…something that many people in this country hadn’t seen before. He forced people to reexamine their thoughts and beliefs. The fact that it all started in Kansas City makes this event very special.”

Actor Andre Holland

When I spoke to Negro League Museum president Kendrick I informed him of what Brett had said about mourning the absence of Buck O’Neil. I asked him how he thought Buck would enjoy this evening’s events. “He would be so excited,” he said, letting out a laugh. “He would own the red carpet. And he would be so proud. This is such a major accomplishment for the museum. And to be connected to a project of this magnitude…one that is shedding new light on one of the greatest American heroes ever as well as shedding light on the playing ground that allowed Jackie to play. The Negro Leagues. Because we don’t get Jackie if not for the Negro Leagues. I hope this film reminds people of just how special the Negro Leagues were and how much talent was there in the Negro Leagues.”

When I spoke to actor Andre Holland, who plays famed sportswriter Wendell Smith in the film, I noted that he was pretty much the only person in the movie that doesn’t get to throw a baseball. Did he ever just wander down to the field and start playing catch? “There were a couple of times, I will not lie to you,” he replied. “I played a lot of baseball growing up and sometimes when I was sitting in the stands…between takes I’d go down, grab a bat and take a swing or toss the ball around. It was hard to be in a baseball stadium and NOT be playing baseball.”

Robert Redford, Stanley Tucci, Brit Marling and Jackie Evancho talk about new film “The Company You Keep”

Opening in New York and Los Angeles on April 5th, “The Company You Keep” tells the story of Jim Grant, a former member of radical sixties group The Weather Underground. Thirty years ago the Weathermen were involved with a bank robbery that turned fatal and Jim is brought out of hiding when another former member (Susan Sarandon) finally turns herself in. Jim must go on the run from both the authorities and a young truth-seeking journalist (played by Shia LeBeouf) to clear his name and reunite with his young daughter (Jackie Evancho). Along the way, he turns to other ex-Weatherman played by an array of veteran actors including Julie Christie, Richard Jenkins, Sam Elliot, Nick Nolte and Chris Cooper. Redford, joined co-stars Stanley Tucci, Brit Marling and Jackie Evancho at a press conference in New York this week to discuss the film.

What do you want people to take from this movie about the legacy of the Weather Underground?
Robert Redford: “There are a probably a number of things to take away. To simplify, I’d probably say the first thing would be that they would think. Some films are made not necessarily to think but it’s like eating cotton candy. You have a wonderful ride and then it’s over and that’s all you really want. And other films are designed in a way to at least make you ask a question afterwards. Or think about what’s happening and maybe start a dialogue with someone. I think maybe that’s what I’d prefer, it’s not always possible. So that’s would be the first thing and the second thing has to do with a criticism that I have for my own country. I don’t think we’re very good at looking at history as a lesson that we learn, so that we don’t repeat a negative historical experience. We’re not good at that. And looking back in time and saying ‘Well, this happened then, what can we learn from that?’ I just think it’s an American tradition to be so busy pushing forward and driving forward and doing, doing, doing. They don’t look back and say ‘Gee, what could I learn from the mistake that I made before?’ So I guess the hope, that’s all it can be, is the hope that you look back in this moment in time–which, by the way when this happened, I was of that age. I was of them in spirit. But because I was starting a career in the New York theater as an actor at that time and I was also starting to raise a family, I was obligated to that task so I wasn’t a part of it. But I was certainly empathetic to what they were doing. I thought it was a wrong war. I thought that it was a war that was going to cost unnecessary lives. It was also a war that was designed by people that had never gone to war. And it had a lot to with kind of a tragic history of the United States with the mistakes it’s made, they never seem to learn by. So that was my own personal criticism about my country and my history. So I guess I would hope that you would look back
on this time, it’s not about what happened then because it’s about thirty years later…There’s a wonderful poem by Yates, one of my favorite poems, there’s a line that says because he was so sick of what was happening to Ireland. He could see that calm Ireland was about to be disrupted by vandalism, by revolt, by revolution and that Ireland would never be the same. And so he was bemoaning that by taking a conservative stance. So he says…’The best lack all conviction, while the worst are filled with passionate intensity’. And I thought that was a nice thing for me to play with. Because people who were filled with that passion and intensity were all older and look back. They’re trapped by their past because in order to stay free from the law they go underground with a false name. But how long can you live without you true identity? And that’s what interested me to tell that story not then but now.”

Brit Marling was also intrigued by the idea of aging activists in this film:

Brit Marling: “
…When I read the script I was really moved by the idea of the Weather Underground and how it’s not set back then but it’s set in present day as this group has sort of come into age of wisdom and experience and are looking back wondering about the radicalism of their youth and did they make the right choices? And would they do it differently now? Which, I think my generation is grappling with a lot of the same ideas. So I was very attracted to that part of the story.”

Redford likened his character’s thirty year evasion of the law to that of Jean Valjean in Les Miserables, a favorite story of his:
Robert Redford:  “I just thought from the time I was a little kid that was one of the greatest stories. So I saw similarities in Shia LeBeouf’s character is inspector Javert in Les Miserables and then I am Jean Valjean in the sense that I go to prison for something I’ve done that’s wrong, I escape, I take on a new identity to escape prison time, I live a clean life, I have a daughter, the daughter means everything to me…I had to give up another daughter before she meant too much for me to give up, that was painful, I don’t want to make that mistake again. So here it is, this means everything to me and yet there’s someone on my tail that might expose me in a way that makes it impossible for me to have the true love of my daughter and a clean, clear life. So that was the complexity that sparked me to make this film.”

Behind Shia LeBeouf’s reporter is his editor as played by Stanley Tucci who spoke about his role:
Stanley Tucci: Shia and I worked one day and we went and did it. But the scenes are very straight-forward. I think that, you know, he is the sort of classic curmudgeonly, exhausted editor. I think particularly in this day and age, he’s an interesting character because he’s the last of a dying breed. You’re not going to see those guys too much anymore.
Redford: …Just want to add something, he talks about the energy–Shia’s energy, which is extreme. Shia has a fast mind and a fast tongue. And for Stanley to work with that and still be the character he had to play. He had to be a man in control within an industry that was going out of control, which adds it’s own dynamic, but the fact that he could manage the energy by creating a counter-energy. As Shia got more crazed, Stanley, if you watch the film, Stanley goes the other way. So it creates a dynamic. When Shia slows down, Stanley goes for his throat. I just enjoyed watching.

The youngest star of the movie, Jackie Evancho is better known for her musical success since she was introduced on tv’s “America’s Got Talent”. Seeing her perform on TV prior to filming, Redford knew he’d found his screen daughter.
Redford:  “I said ‘Woah wait a minute, what’s this?’ because I don’t watch much television, so I look at this and then the camera–she’s singing Puccini! And I’m thinking ‘How does that work?’ And so the camera pulls back and there’s this symphony hall and there’s this huge orchestra in this symphony hall and this creature standing there just belting this music out there. It was so powerful…If somebody who has that composure, who can do that in front of that kind of an audience, with that kind of register, with that kind of complexity, maybe that could work. So anyway, to make a long story short, I contacted the agent, the casting person, I said ‘Find out who this person is, where she is.’ They find out she lives in Pittsburgh with her parents, they live a normal life except when she had to do these shows and they went out and taped her. They taped her, I don’t think they knew what was going on. Jackie can speak to that. They sent the tape back, it was clear she didn’t know what was going on and I thought, I don’t care, there’s something–I’m going to take this chance. She was hired on Tuesday, she came, we filmed on Wednesday. We filmed the first day I met her and I can only tell you, from that point on I figured I am one lucky man, because she turned out to be absolutely lovely…We just played together we just became people who could play together, who could have fun together and improvise together. So I ended up the beneficiary of a risk taken on Jackie.”
Jackie Evancho: All I can say was I was extremely honored to have a chance to actually act with you guys. That I was really really excited that I got the role and I just really had a lot of fun so, thank you.

Being only twelve years old, Jackie was asked if she was familiar with the name Robert Redford or his most famous films.
Jackie Evancho: Well, my dad, he always talked about it with his brothers he just would like goof around and stuff. So when I heard the name, I wasn’t very familiar with it, I shouldn’t say “it”! …The only thing that I knew was my dad was like ‘He played a cowboy.’ And that’s all I knew. I actually thought that it was an amazing honor.

Did you during the making of the film have any positive thoughts about the country and journalism?
Robert Redford: Positive? I don’t about positive so much as valuable. Because I consider journalism as so valuable. I would almost–I don’t want to be too much ego here–but I would almost take it personally if journalism failed itself. Because that’s the one avenue we have to the truth. So if I’m going to portray journalism in a film, it’s tricky business…Then you want to at least give it it’s due. Then describe the threats that are maybe against it. So in this case, the idea of Shia’s character was to me more interesting if it was complicated by the fact that is he going after the story for his own personal advertisement? Is he going after it for just getting the story? He should dance with that as he moves forward and what should be unmistakeable is what he learns about himself. In his pursuit about finding somebody else, what does he learn about himself that may change him? That was exciting to me but you have to be careful, I think you have to be careful about when you’re dealing with journalism… You have to test certain things and then back away and let the audience go with it. What they’re going to do with it.

Blu-ray Review "Jackie Chan Double Feature: Crime Story / The Protector"

Actors: Jackie Chan, Kent Cheng, Danny Aiello
Directors: Kirk Woong, James Glickenhaus
Rated: R (Restricted)
Studio: Shout! Factory
Release Date: January 15, 2013
Run Time: 198 minutes

Double Feature: 3 out of 5 stars
Extras: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Who doesn’t love classic Jackie Chan? This double feature includes two films: “Crime Story” and “The Protector”. It is great to see Chan fly around without wires or CG effects. The US cut of “The Protector” is good but has never been my favorite of mine or Jackie Chan’s either hence his created his own personal cut with more action and less nudity. Luckily this edition is included in the special features. You can tell that Shout! but some love into this release and they are a real step up from Echo Bridge’s four-pack of Jackie Chan’s features on Blu-ray. If you are a fan of Jackie Chan, then you are going to want to check this out.  Looking for more? Shout! Factory is releasing another Jackie Chan Double Feature “Police Story / Police Story II” this April.

“Crime Story” Official Premise: Jackie Chan stars in one of his grittiest roles ever as a police detective on the edge, who must race against time to solve a deadly kidnapping case. Based on the shocking true story of a billionaire abducted in a bold ambush, and filled with explosive martial-arts battles, Crime Story pulses with tension and excitement. Director Kirk Wong (The Big Hit) deftly combines acrobatic fight choreography with edge-of-your-seat action for this thrilling and dramatic tour-de-force for Jackie Chan.

“The Protector” Official Premise: Written and directed by James Glickenhaus (The Exterminator), The Protector stars Jackie Chan and Danny Aiello (Do the Right Thing) as a pair of NYPD cops sent to Hong Kong to catch a drug lord who has kidnapped the daughter of his former associate. Also starring martial-arts star Moon Lee (Angel Force) and Roy Chiao (Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom), this thriller features Hollywood-style action sprinkled with Chan’s death-defying stunts.

Shout! Factory has delivered decent but not amazing 1080p transfers here, both presented in their original aspect ratios of 1.85:1.  When I think about classic Jackie Chan action films, I think about the gritty feel though so they work for me to be honest.  They are not perfect but then again neither or the films themselves. The audio tracks on the other hand are much more solid.  “Crime Story” comes with both a Cantonese and English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track. Obviously the original Cantonese works the best personally.  Then there is also a Cantonese and English Dolby Digital 2.0. “The Protector” comes with an English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 and English Dolby Digital 2.0.

The special features for “Crime Story” are good but not great. There is an interview with the director Kirk Wong in Cantonese, with optional English subtitles. There are a few deleted scenes also in Cantonese, with optional English subtitles. Lastly there is the original un-subtitled trailer and a US trailer. “The Protector” really delivers the best features on this release. “The Protector: Alternate Cut” is Jackie Chan’s personal cut of the film and is in Cantonese, with optional English subtitles but only in standard definition. “From New York to Hong Kong” is an interview with director James Glickenhaus talking about working with Jackie Chan. “Locations: Then and Now” is a shot featurette showing the shooting location, not narrated and can be skipped. “Behind the Scenes Featurette” is raw shooting footage in Cantonese and not subtitled. Lastly there is the Hong Kong and US trailer included.

Blu-ray Review “Miramax Multi-Feature: Jackie Chan Series”

Directed by & Starring: Jackie Chan
MPAA Rating: R
Distributed by: Echo Bridge Home Entertainment
Release Date: November 29, 2011
Running Time: 386 minutes

Operation Condor: 3 out of 5 stars
Operation Condor- Armour of God 2: 3 out of 5 stars
Jackie Chan’s Project A: 3 out of 5 stars
Jackie Chan’s Project A2: 2.5 out of 5 stars
Blu-ray Score: 2.5 out of 5 stars

I remember dating back to 1994 when I first saw Jackie Chan’s “Rumble in the Bronx”, still one of my favorites. It changed my life and introduced me to kung-fu films. Since then Jackie’s films have been ported to the US over the years. The films included in this set are not his best but are still entertaining. Though since they are American versions of the films, they are badly cut and edited. They also are only available with a dubbed track not the original language with subtitles. Though with the low price, fans of Jackie Chan will enjoy a chance to see this films on Blu-ray.

“Operation Condor” features Jackie Chan as the world’s greatest secret agent, code name Condor, who is sent to track down stolen Nazi gold. “Operation Condor: Armour of God 2” features Chan back as the fortune hunter whose ex-girlfriend is kidnapped and held for ransom by an evil cult. “Jackie Chan’s Project A” features Chan as Dragon, a coast guard officer on patrol in late 19th century Hong Kong, who battles with a vicious gang syndicate for control of the waters. “Jackie Chan’s Project A2” follows its predecessor where Dragon is assigned to lead the local police force but discovers and aims to remove police corruption.

The Blu-ray transfers on these films are not the greatest. They are all presented in 1080p though, which is a plus at least. The video quality on “Operation Condor 2: Armour of the Gods” is the best on the disc but it only comes with Dobly Stereo 2.0 audio track, as does “Project A”. “Project A” and “Project A2” transfers are also very grainy and rough, despite the 1080p transfer. “Operation Condor” and “Project A2” comes with Dobly Digital 5.1 surround tracks. Overall mixed results on these films, leading up to barely satisfactory. But when it comes down to it, you can find this Bluray for $10 or less and for that it is worth your money.

 

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Interview with Jackie Earle Haley

Jackie Earle Haley is the new face of Freddy Kreuger in the remake of “A Nightmare on Elm Street”. He recently sat down and answered a few questions about his role and what was it like to play the iconic role of Freddy.

Q: What is your worst nightmare?
A: I am sure I have had a worse nightmares than this, but I did have this weird reoccurring dream when I was a kid. I remember dreaming that I am sleeping in the same bed but it seems like I am really awake and I am in the room. All of the sudden this tall sort of six foot tarantula man busts through the door and scares the bejesus out of me. I somehow get around him. I am racing down the hall of the house that I grew up in as a kid. Right as he gets on top of me, I wake up. This happened time and time again. I am not scared of spiders. I do not know what this dream meant.

Q: You originally tried out for the role that Johnny Depp got in the first “Nightmare on Elm Street”, are you a fan of the series?
A: Well, that is actually a rumor for the first “Nightmare on Elm Street”. I might have auditioned for “Nightmare on Elm Street” and don’t remember. It is also possible, I could have been sitting next to Johnny in the waiting room. It is the only thing I could figure where that started from. I am really not a big horror genre fan. When I saw “Nightmare on Elm Street” trailer in the mid-80’s, I went to see it in the movie theater and I dug it, it was different. At that time, it was part of a group of films. I mean out of the “Friday the 13th” and “Halloween” series, this was my favorite. It always held more interest to me. I felt it was developed better and was more multi-dimensional, not only the monster but the rest of the characters as well. I thought it was an interesting horror film. Over the years I have probably seen bits and pieces of the other ones. I wasn’t a big “Nightmare on Elm Street” fan who sat and watched every one of them.

Q: Where there any things you tried to do in your performance to amplify the terror?
A: I do not think I was really approaching it from that angle. I was hoping that the terror and horror was present. It was more to me about embracing this character and what was going on with him and meaning it. Hopefully at the end of the day it was scary. At this point, when you’re saying “Hey wow it was scary”, I am going “Cool”. I don’t know yet. I sure hope he is scary. I saw the movie and I really liked it a lot but I am close to it. So from the Freddy aspect of it, I am sure we will hear all sorts of opinions on that.

Q: How was it being underneath all that makeup with Freddy?
A: Wow, what it is like in the makeup is the most cumbersome arduous stuff I have ever dealt with. Sitting in that chair for three and a half hours while they are pain-stakingly gluing this thing down. It is a slow process. It goes all the way to my eye balls and even on my eye lids. I mean poking and prodding. I remember sitting there and thinking it has to be better going to the dentist. Since then I have been to the dentist and I was right! It was just uncomfortable. It took me a while to acclimate to it as well. I think I was really agitated for a while. They also put fake finger tips on left hand and the knife on the other hand. I really couldn’t get anything out of my pocket. Surprisingly, the straw that broke the camel’s back was the contact lenses. I couldn’t see. One eye was blurry and the other was bloody. That would make me recede even more. I felt apart from the group and everything. The best thing to do was sit and wait till they were ready. I would take all of those odd and other-worldly feelings and give it to Freddy during action and cut.

Q: Did you have any hesitation about the role when you saw what Freddy’s background was?
A: There was a big pause concerning that for me. After playing Ronnie in “Little Children”, I was fairly certain I was done with that. But at the same time, this was Freddy Krueger! When I was considering this, a voice in my head said “How can you not play Freddy Krueger!” I think the reason why I am able to embrace this was that I embraced the fact that I was the bogeyman. I felt I was able to do it. I am not even sure how much cross-over there will be from those audiences.

Q: Would you be willing to step into the role of Freddy Krueger again?
A: Obviously we need to see how the movie does but I am signed on for doing a couple of more. I hope when it comes out people aren’t scared of me as being this monster guy outside the film.

 

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