Win Passes to the Kansas City Screening of “Long Shot”

Media MIkes has teamed up with their friends at Lionsgate Films to give (35) readers and a guest the chance to be among the first to see the new film, “Long Shot,” starring Seth Rogen and Charlize Theron.

The screening will be held on Monday, April 29th at the Cinemark Theatre in Merriam, Kansas and will begin at 7:00 pm

All you have to do is click HERE. The first (35) readers to do so will receive a pass for two to attend the screening. This is a first come/first serve giveaway. Once the allotted passes have been claimed the giveaway has ended. Good luck!

“Long Shot” opens nationwide on Friday, May 3rd.

Blu-ray Review “The Odd Angry Shot”

Actors: Bryan Brown, John Hargreaves, Graham Kennedy, Graeme Blundell
Directors: Tom Jeffrey
Rated: Unrated
Studio: Synapse Films
Release Date: August 13, 2013
Run Time: 92 minutes

Film: 3 out of 5 stars
Extras: 2.5 out of 5 stars

“The Odd Angry Shot” is a highly-acclaimed Australian war film taking a look into the hell of Vietnam.  I have to admit, I was not aware of this film prior to this release.  I know that when I see Synapse Films backing a film that it has to be good..or at least worth checking out.  Naturally, I am not a big fan of war films, not sure 100% way though.  I enjoy watching them but I never rush out to revisit again. The film stars Bryan Brown, who then went on to do films like “Breaker Morant” and “F/X” series. “The Odd Angry Shot” has never before been released on DVD in the U.S., so fans of this classic war film should be excited to finally see it getting some love. The film itself shows a different side of the war and really gets down and dirty to show the gritty truth behind it.  Definitely worth a rent for sure!

Official Premise: Tom Jeffrey’s classic Australian film, “The Odd Angry Shot”, is set in the late 1960s during the brutal war Australians shared with the United States: the struggle for Vietnam. Harry (Graham Kennedy), a hard-edged Special Air Service Corporal, meets a new company of soldiers during his second tour in Vietnam. There’s the naïve Bill (John Jarratt), the easy-going Bung (John Hargreaves), the blunt Rogers (Bryan Brown), the pragmatic Dawson (Graeme Blundell), and the youthful and innocent Scott (Ian Gilmour). Because of their training as professional soldiers from Australia’s toughest Army unit, these men believe they can deal with any situation. They pass the time playing practical jokes, getting into drunken brawls and humoring themselves to keep their minds off the war. But, when the first odd angry shot rings out, and an enemy mortar barrage hits their camp causing many casualties, the men realize their protective shield of humor is no defense at all against the harsh realities of armed combat.

For a film dating back to 1979, This film has never looked better with its new high-definition 1080p (1.78:1) transfer which was taken from original vault materials. Since this film has been given a proper U.S. release since VHS. So this should be a real treat for fans of this cult classic.  Same goes for the DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 track, which works well showcasing the action from the war. Like most Synapse Films releases “The Angry Odd Shot” also comes with a sharp reversible cover art. The special features included are not spectacular but worth checking out. There is an audio commentary with Producer/Director Tom Jeffrey, Producer Sue Milliken and co-star Graeme Blundell. Worth checking out if you are a fan of the show. There is a featurette “Stunts Down Under with Buddy Joe Hooker”, which looks into how the stunts were performed.  Lastly, there is an original theatrical trailer included.

“A Single Shot” Premieres at Tribeca

Based on Matthew Jones’s 1996 novel of the same name, A Single Shot stars Sam Rockwell as a down and out hunter who accidentally kills a young woman. Having found money in her camp, he decides to hide what he’s done and use it to try and put his life back together leading to an escalating cat-and-mouse game with the owners of the money. Having made its debut at the Berlin International Festival, the film held it’s US premiere at Tribeca on Friday April 26th.

Actress Heather Lind plays Mincy in the film whom she describes as a “free spirit, impulsive woman that tries to befriend Sam’s character and bring him out of his funk”. Lind is a familiar New York face coming from Boardwalk Empire as well as a long list of Broadway credits, I asked her what it meant to have the Film Fest in the city:

Heather Lind: “It’s a great question, I’ve been in New York for about twelve years, I grew up up in Albany but I’ve been in the city for twelve years. I just love this city, I think anything that happens, that appears in the city is a good thing. Working on this film was kind of surreal enough and then getting to come to the premiere here in New York was, you know great.”

The atmospheric film, though set in West Virginia, was shot in Vancouver, Canada. Director David M Rosenthal discussed this choice:

David M Rosenthal: “I was looking for a place to shoot that had, you know this kind of gray weather and that provided this fog layer and this mist layer. And there’s not that many places where you can find that and Vancouver has it in spades and also has great crews and great secondary actors. It seemed to make a lot of sense.

Rosenthal went on to praise his ensemble cast: “It was so wonderful for me to get all of these people together because you know, there’s so many actors in this movie that I got to work with who I absolutely revere. I’m not even talking shit, I really revere these actors like Sam Rockwell and Jeffrey Wright and Bill Macy and Jason Isaacs and Kelly Reilly. Really I just walk around feeling just blessed about the fact that I got to work with them.”

The director was particularly excited to see Sam Rockwell take on the part of John Moon: “Sam Rockwell is one of the most versatile actors in America. He’s maybe one of the very best actors of his generation. I don’t think many people could argue with that. So the list gets short when you’re thinking of someone of a specific age, it’s like ‘okay, maybe we could get x, maybe we could even get this guy, maybe we can get this guy, maybe we can get Sam Rockwell. Let’s get Sam Rockwell.’ ‘Sam Rockwell read it, he likes the script.’ ‘Really?’ Fantastic!”

British actress Kelly Reilly plays Rockwell’s wife in the film and added to Rosenthal’s enthusiasm for their lead: “I had probably six days on this movie, all-in-all and I just remember working, just having a blast with Sam. He’s such a fun down-to-Earth man. So I really enjoyed working with him.”

Considering the film begins with John Moon carrying out a murder, I asked writer Matthew F. Jones if he could see John Moon in a sympathetic light:

Matthew F Jones: “I always look to John as a very noble, upright guy in a very tough situation and part of the, I think part of the interesting of this movie…was that anyone of us could put ourselves in John situation. The life he was living and then what happens to him in a single shot and the decisions that he had to make and so…I don’t look at him as a shady character, I look at him as a noble guy in a tough situation.”

Sam Rockwell was in agreement with Jones regarding his character: “I do sympathize with him, but you know, that’s–I hope that everybody does. I think he’s really isolated and a lonely guy, he’s trying to reconnect with his family and stuff.”

Lauren Damon: Are you drawn to isolated characters like John?

Rockwell: Well, I don’t know, maybe. I’m drawn to those guys for some reason but I like them all.

LD: A lot of this movie is physically grueling, how was that?

Rockwell: Yeah, a lot of cramps! Waking up in the middle of the night with a lot of cramps and stuff.

Rockwell was also on the red carpet at TFF this year supporting other films he was in, Trust Me and A Case of You.

LD: Was it by accident you wound up with three films premiering at Tribeca?

Rockwell: Well, that was a fluke. That was a fluke.

 

You can read our review of A Single Shot here!

 

Related Content

Tribeca Film Festival Review “A Single Shot”

Director: David M. Rosenthal
Starring: Sam Rockwell, Jeffrey Wright, Kelly Reilly, Jason Isaacs, Joe Anderson
MPAA Rating: R
Running Time: 116 minutes

Our Score: 3 out of 5 Stars

 A Single Shot begins with West Virginian hunter John Moon (Sam Rockwell) accidentally shooting a woman dead while hunting deer. As if this weren’t enough cause for alarm, John discovers both a hand gun and a suspicious stash of cash in her makeshift camp. Moon hides the body and takes the money. Never the best plan. What follows is a tense backwoods cat and mouse game held together by a strong lead in a terrifying setting.

Moon, it turns out, has already been in trouble with the law as a poacher and sees the money as a means to get back his estranged wife (Kelly Reilly) and son. It doesn’t forgive Moon for his actions but reveals him as a desperate fool for thinking his plan has any chance of succeeding. He’s not unfamiliar with breaking the law, but not on the scale of the men whose threats start with phone calls and escalate. Rockwell does an amazing job at taking John through all the levels of fear. Whether he’s trying to remain calm as his phone rings in the presence of an old friend (Jeffrey Wright) or outright challenging unseen attackers in the woods, you can really feel the panic of a man realizing he’s in way over his head. The forrest surroundings John was so familiar with at the start of the film suddenly turn on him and it seems as though violence can, and in fact does, break out anywhere around him. Often shockingly so. The woods are beautifully shot in all their ominous foggy glory by Eduard Grau, and manage to seem expansive and claustrophobic at the same time.

The strong ensemble cast is perhaps too large to be sustained by a film whose focus must remain solidly on Moon’s dilemma. For example, as Waylon, the thug behind the money, Jason Isaacs isn’t given as much screen time as you would like considering he’s supposed to be the big bad of the movie. Consequently he is out-menaced early on by lackey Obadiah (a magnetic, psycho Joe Anderson) and Moon’s divorce lawyer played by William H. Macy (wearing a crime against toupees). Similarly, Moon and his wife’s relationship could have been strengthened to get at the heart of Moon more than the flirtations we wind up seeing with his neighbor’s daughter. Ultimately though this is Rockwell’s movie and there’s no doubt he’s an expert at isolation. His Moon is reason enough to wander into these woods.