KRAMER ANNOUNCES ORIGINAL, MODERN, AND ARTIST COLLECTIONS FOR 2021

KRAMER: MADE TO ROCK HARD

Above: a close-up of the Snake Sabo Baretta.
KRAMER, the original MADE TO ROCK HARD guitar brand has been setting trends with a legacy of premium, performance-focused instruments since it was first launched in 1976. Made for rule-breakers that play fast and loud, KRAMER has been embraced by legendary rockers and shredders like Eddie Van Halen, Vivian CampbellRichie Sambora, Elliot Easton, and Mick Mars and more during the height of the metal era in the 1980s–a period when it was the most popular guitar brand in the world. KRAMER’s innovative approach and unwavering commitment to performance spans entry-level and intermediate guitars, to professional offerings, across the entire line and continue to make KRAMER instruments the choice of today’s hard rock and metal legends. 

New for 2021, KRAMER debuts the new Artist Collection featuring collaborations with Snake Sabo (Baretta), Charlie Parra (Vanguard), and Tracii Guns (Gunstar Voyager), with more collaborations to come throughout the year. From its iconic models and legendary artist collaborations to the Original and Modern CollectionsKRAMER is back. “We leveled-up with our Kramer re-birth and new focus, giving hard rock and heavy metal shredders what they wanted,” says Cesar Gueikian of Gibson. “This is just the beginning for Kramer, we have big plans for the brand’s future, starting with these exciting collections and collaborations plus a few more we will be announcing throughout 2021.” 

KRAMER Artist Collection:Artist Collection guitar specs: HERE. 

The Snake Sabo Baretta is the premier signature model from Skid Row’s Snake Sabo. Inspired by his favorite road guitar, the Snake Sabo Baretta features a replica graphic commissioned by Sabo and created by legendary KRAMER artist Dennis Kline. The Snake Sabo Baretta features a new Kramer 85-T™ Double Black Open Coil Humbucker™ that was designed by Gibson™ USA Luthier Jim DeCola, a K-SpeedSlimTaper™ neck with jumbo frets, a Floyd Rose® 1000 bridge system, and a EVH® D-Tuna® Drop D Tuning System. 

“I’m so proud that the Kramer brand has been resurrected by Gibson and humbled by the fact that they’ve allowed me to be a part of it,” says Snake Sabo. “The Snake Baretta started out as a simple idea 35 years ago and played such a big part in our formative years. Now Kramer has kindly released it as a limited edition. I’m so proud and honored to be part of the Gibson and Kramer family. I hope everyone enjoys this guitar as much as I have since it was first made in 1985.”
Above: Snake Sabo with his KRAMER Snake Sabo Baretta.

The Tracii Guns Gunstar Voyager is ready to rock and marks the first KRAMER signature model for pioneering L.A. Guns guitarist. The Gunstar Voyager features a star-shaped mahogany Voyager body with a black metallic finish and flame graphics, a 3-piece set maple neck with a Slim C profile and a classic KRAMER pointy headstock with a Kramer Pyramid logo on the front and a chrome wrench holder on the back, two Epiphone™ ProBucker™ pickups, each with its own volume control and coil-splitting push / pull switch for broad tonal flexibility, and a Floyd Rose 1000 series tremolo and a top mounted R2 Locking Nut and Chrome string retainer bar. 

“I play the guitars my heroes play, and those guitars are Gibson’s,” says Tracii Guns from L.A. Guns. “As the future has arrived now, I have designed the ultimate metal guitar with Kramer guitars loudly and proudly called the Kramer Gunstar Voyager for my shredding friends. Made To Metal!!!”

Above: Tracii Guns with his KRAMER Tracii Guns Gunstar Voyager.

The Charlie Parra Vanguard is the second KRAMER signature model from the Peruvian metal master. Featuring a mahogany body, 3-piece satin-finished maple neck, bound ebony fretboard with 22 jumbo frets, dot inlays with 12th fret Day of the Dead owl, a single chrome knurled master volume control and 3-way pickup selector switch mounted on a satin aluminum pickguard, EMG™ 57 and 66 pickups with chrome covers, a recessed output jack on the upper horn, and a LockTone™ Tune-O-Matic™ bridge and Stop Bar tailpiece. Charlie Parra’s signature is engraved on the truss rod cover, and his Vanguard is finished in Candy Apple Red Gloss

“I’m so humbled and honored to be part of the Gibson family as their first South American signature artist thanks to the comeback of Kramer,” says Charlie Parra. “This limited-edition Kramer Vanguard honors the classic 80s look and vibe with a twist of modern hardware, 24 fret madness and full access cutaway. I hope guitar players everywhere enjoy this instrument that may look tough, and heavy, but plays really smooth!”

Above: Charlie Parra with his KRAMER Charlie Parra Vanguard.

Watch and share the new KRAMER signature artist panel featuring Tracii Guns, Snake Sabo, Charlie Parra and host Mark AgnesiDirector of Brand Experience at Gibson Brands: HERE.

KRAMER Original Collection:Original Collection guitar specs: HERE. 

The KRAMER heads back to basics with the Original Collection of guitars which capture the look and feel of the original shredder guitar. Utilizing the best tone woods, components, neck profiles, and iconic body shapes, these guitars take players back in time to experience guitars made famous by legendary guitar heroes. The new Original Collection which includes the Baretta Special, and Focus VT -211S which are some of the most influential guitars in rock history and designed for new players to discover KRAMER at an affordable price. Crossing over into the higher-end rock classics, KRAMER brings in the Jersey StarPacerSM-1NightSwanThe 84, the Baretta and all of the iconic models that changed the guitar world forever. 

KRAMER Modern Collection:Modern Collection guitar specs: HERE. 

The KRAMER Modern Collection add a present-day twist on killer classic designs. Be on the lookout for guitars with new neck-to-body joints, contemporary hardware and tremolo options, cutting-edge pickups and electronic options for a wider range of tonal possibilities, and other options geared toward players that want to launch into hyperspace all with the Kramer DNA intact. KRAMER’sModern Collection features innovative design with classic lines including the Assault 220, Assault PlusNite-VNite-V Plus, and KRAMER’s premier bass, the D-1 Bass and more.

Above: the KRAMER Jersey Star, SM-1, Baretta, The 84, Assault Plus and Pacer.
 

Book Review: “The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5 and My Life of Impossibilities” By: Wayne Kramer

“The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5 and My Life of Impossibilities”
Author: Wayne Kramer
Da Capo
Hardcover: 311 pages

Our Score: 3.5 out of 5 stars

“The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5 and My Life of Impossibilities” is the story of legendary guitarist Wayne Kramer. From his childhood in Detroit where he found inspiration from the likes Chuck Berry and the Rolling Stones to his pursuit of “avant rock” with his group the MC5. Released via Da Capo Press “The Hard Stuff” is a 311 page biography recounting a life of rock and roll excess to prison confinement making all stops in between and any there-after.

As gritty as the ground breaking groups music “The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5 and My Life of Impossibilities” is a brutally honest, in-depth look at M5 founding member Wayne Kramer’s life. Told by the man himself Kramer recounts his upbringing in a home with an abusive stepfather and how he channeled his inner frustrations about the world around him into some of the MC5’s most notable material. Though I found the chapters recounting his time with the band the following chapters after the group disbanding was where my attention was really held. Kramer painstakingly tells of his time in prison after a drug bust and the years after in which he struggled with addiction up through reconnecting with his biological father.

“The Hard Stuff” is a roller coaster ride of emotion that keeps the reader interested and turning the pages. Not many people (if any) have had a life like Wayne Kramer and this book makes that abundantly clear. You don’t need to be a fan of Kramer’s music to enjoy this book as the author speaks his truth and does not shy away from darker periods of his life or difficult subject matter. For those hoping to catch the MC5 on the 50th anniversary tour this is the perfect foundation to help connect or reconnect with one of rock music’s most influential artists/groups.

Wayne Kramer talks about directing “Pawn Shop Chronicles”

Wayne Kramer is the director of the “Pawn Shop Chronicles”, which has an epic cast including Paul Walker, Kevin Rankin, Elijah Wood, Brendan Fraser, Vincent D’Onofrio, Thomas Jane, Matt Dillon and Lukas Haas. Wayne has directed other recent films as well including “The Cooler”, “Running Scared” (also with Paul Walker) and “Crossing Over”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Wayne about this crazy fun film and how he achieve the feeling of watching a graphic novel coming to life.

Mike Gencarelli: How did you become attached to direct “Pawn Shop Chronicles”?
Wayne Kramer: I was originally talking to Paul Walker about directing him in a script that I had written, but it was having some difficulty getting set-up. Paul was already attached to “Pawn Shop” and when the original director fell out, he called me up and asked if I would be interested in coming on board because it was already financed and ready to go. I was initially reluctant because the budget was quite low and I was only looking to direct my own projects, but I read the script (by Adam Minarovich) out of a courtesy to Paul. I was immediately taken with it. I appealed to my sick sense of humor and I also enjoyed the more surreal aspects of the world Adam created. I also felt that the material would allow me to bring a certain fun filmmaking style to the piece, if we could figure out how to get there on such a low budget.

MG: From the moment the movie starts its feels like you are watching a graphic novel come to life, tell us about how you achieved that aspect?
WK: Upon first reading the script, I felt it required a very stylized, almost Tex Avery-ish approach. Despite the lazy critical assessment that we ripped-off Tarantino (I get this on every film – and it pisses me off to no end because I’ve never been influenced by Quentin’s films, but it’s clear that we share many of the same influences: De Palma, Peckinpah, Aldrich, Hill, etc.), my initial feeling was that PAWN SHOP belonged in a universe that felt like a cross between early Coen Brothers (“Raising Arizona”, “Big Lebowski”, “O Brother…”) and 70’s revenge/exploitation themed films like “White Lightning” and “Prime Cut”. The more I played around with it in pre-production, I started to pick up on a “Creepshow” meets “Crumb” kinda vibe as well – in that the actual storylines felt like something from old EERIE COMICS with a Redneck flavor to them. It’s a whole stew of whacky influences hopefully stirred into its own original thing. I just have to say, it’s near impossible for any filmmaker to escape the shadow of “Pulp Fiction” when telling an anthology crime story and it infuriates me in that’s the first thing film illiterate critics glom onto. Aside from one wink at “Pulp Fiction” about Alton’s brother being killed in a pawn shop on the west coast(which was always in Adam’s script and in hindsight, I probably should have cut), PULP was the furthest thing from our minds.

MG: How was it reuniting with Paul Walker and putting him in such a unique role?
WK: It was a blast working with Paul again. He’s the most game actor I’ve ever worked with and gives nothing less than 100 percent each time. We share the same sensibility when it comes to dark, kick-ass material, so it’s never a battle of wills when we get on the set. He’s also the kind of actor that always has the
director’s back and as a filmmaker you couldn’t ask for anything more. Paul is also a producer on PAWN SHOP, so he had a little more invested than just turning up and focusing on his own character.

MG:  Let’s talk about the rest of the cast, how did you gather all this great talent together?
WK: Well, once a film gets greenlit, you just start moving ahead and word gets out that the film is happening and agents start doing their thing, which is to get work for their clients and somehow it all just falls into place. I was super thrilled when Matt Dillon agreed to play Richard because Matt’s an actor I’ve always loved and thankfully he also turned out to be a joy to work with. I honestly think Matt had the most difficult role to pull off in the film because the leap his character makes tonally in just a few hours is insane and I don’t think many actors without Matt’s subtle comedic chops could have pulled it off. It felt to me like he was channeling Bruce Campbell circa EVIL DEAD towards the end there with his manic hysteria. I had met with Vincent D’Onofrio a few months earlier and he had a great take on Alton and thankfully it worked out and he ended up in the film. Vincent was another amazing actor to work with. I’d love to do anything with him in the future. Brendan Fraser really came and invested himself in the character and it was hysterical to watch him disappear into Ricky every day. He had the most difficult schedule on the film, having to fly in and out of Louisiana several times to accommodate his character turning up all over the schedule. We were also lucky to fit Elijah Wood into a very tight window as well and he was a total soldier for his few days on the film since he had to wear a very uncomfortable and complicated make-up rig, which he never ever complained about. Super cool guy and a total fan of the genre. I think one of the most exciting additions to our cast was Kevin Rankin as Randy, Raw Dog’s partner in crime. Kevin is the consummate actor and just disappears inside every character he plays. I didn’t even realize until we were a few days into shooting that he played the character of Devil on “Justified,” a show I’m a huge fan of. I also have to commend Pell James for having the courage to take on the role of Cyndi. She’s virtually unrecognizable in the part and we only see her clothed one time in a quick flashback moment – so she has my undying respect. She also happens to be an incredibly talented actor who should be doing way more movies. I’ve been friends with Thomas Jane for quite some time and he was kind enough to agree to play The Man for me, which I think is a fun little cameo. Another actor that should be working more often – and on bigger films. Same goes for Lukas Haas who was another joy to work with. We got very, very lucky with the cast and I hope to work with all of them again at some point.

MG:  Tell us about your decisions to switch aspect ratios between each segment?
WK:  I was just having some fun with some of the faux Sergio Leone type moments in each chronicle. The arrival of The Man felt like it wanted to be in widescreen, almost like those old Marlboro ads that played in movie theaters (it was probably more an international cinema thing because I saw them in South Africa when I was a kid and we saw a lot of commercials before the main feature started). When Matt Dillon faces off against Michael Cudlitz, it felt like it warranted a similar aspect ratio gag – and when Brendan Fraser’s Elvis impersonator arrives in front of the barber shops, again, I felt like it was almost a classical western motif of the stranger come to town. Having an aspect ratio gag in each chronicle also created a visual commonality between all three stories and for me is a reminder of the tongue in cheek approach to the film.

MG:  What was the biggest challenge of entwining these three segments together?
WK: I think the biggest challenge was taking three tonally very different stories and trying to make them fit within the same narrative. We jump from a Tex Averystyle, madcap Hillbilly episode to a darkly humorous Southern Gothic revenge story, to a more comedic take on the musician meeting the Devil at mythical crossroads in the deep South. But if someone looks a little deeper at the film, they will see a fun subtext about the town of Erwin, Georgia being purgatory and all the (morally dubious) characters coming through the portal of the pawn shop being challenged to make choices that decide their very fates. We buried lots of Satanic imagery throughout the film, some more obvious than others. There are pentagrams carved into the tables of the barbecue joint, which is also called “Lou’s Fire Pit” as in Lucifer, which features a very hellish red color motif. JJ gets his face burned into the seal of the smoker which reads, “Holy Smokes.” The meth lab goes up in hell fire… Satan makes a deal for Ricky’s soul by transforming him into Elvis for four minutes on stage… The liquor store with the blues player out front is called Cross Roads Liquor and the address is 666 Charon Street… The liquor store also has a painted clock sign with no hands suggesting time has stopped in this town. We have creepy, featureless masks on some of the carnival extras – if you look carefully, you’ll see them at times. Some of the girls at the carnival are also holding little devil dolls. Many other references as well…

MG: What do you have planned next?
WK: I’ve got a bunch of irons in the fire. It’s hard to talk about them until they actually get greenlit. I may be doing another film with Alec Baldwin (and Patrick Wilson) next year, so I’m really looking forward to that.

 

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Interview with Stepfanie Kramer

Stepfanie Kramer is appearing on the new hit TV series “The Secret Circle” on The CW this coming January. She is playing the role of Kate Meade. Stepfanie is know for her role of Sgt. Dee Dee McCall on the 80’s TV series “Hunter”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with about her role in “The Secret Circle” and what we can expect from her character.

Mike Gencarelli: Can you tell us how you got involved with “The Secret Circle”?
Stepfanie Kramer: I went in for an audition much like everyone else. I must have delivered what they were looking for. My character Kate is a very interesting woman as she is rather complicated when making decisions. She loves her family and is a very strong lady who knows exactly what she wants.

MG: You character is described kind of woman who can warm you with a smile but freeze you with a single glare, how did you prepare for this role?
SK: (Laughs) I just patterned her after a family member. Everyone has someone like Kate in their family.

MG: What can we expect from episode 10 in the show?
SK: I can’t really say too much. Other than I play the grandma to a 16 year which is sort of funny because in real life I am the mother of a 16 year old. This episode will bring a different dynamic to mine and my son’s relationship.

MG: Tell us about this rivalry with Dawn (Natasha Henstridge)?
SK: It’s not so much a rivalry for attention. Kate is aware of certain things that are underway that other characters are not. I really can’t tell much more than that as a lot has yet to be revealed. It’s a really fun show to work on in that respect. Everyone who works on the show is really great.

MG: How do you feel that “The Secret Circle” differs from other similar themed shows on TV?
SK: I have been very fortunate with my career. Work is just work and each environment is always different. The experience is always something new each time. I really just enjoy the process of everything.

MG: Can we expect more from Kate Meade the rest of the season?
SK: There have been talks of this being a reoccurring role. They haven’t killed me yet so it’s a possibility. The response from the network has been very kind and that has been great. It’s always nice to know people appreciate what you do.