Advance Your Career As A Musician Through YouTube

Achieving success as a musician can be measured in a variety of ways, but one thing that practically all musicians have in common is their desire for their music to be heard. While this may have been difficult in the past, the internet has certainly changed things. Many contemporary musicians we all know and love had their start on YouTube, and so can you. 

Using Livestreams In Lieu Of Concerts

One of the best ways to showcase your music is to hold live concerts. With YouTube, setting up an event is easier than it has ever been – just prep yourself and start live streaming through the app. You can use YouTubeStorm to help direct more traffic towards your livestream, which will give your music more exposure. By popularizing your music, you are achieving the first step towards success. After all, artists like Justin Bieber owe their humble beginnings to YouTube – you never know who is watching. 

Exclusive Content Through Subscriptions

You definitely don’t want to be a struggling musician for too long, so it’s best to find ways to earn money using your music. In addition to ad generated revenue through YouTube’s creator fund, you can prompt your fans to subscribe to premium content, where they will gain access to exclusive music that isn’t available on your main channel. Patreon is a popular choice for content creators who wish to use a subscription based offer.

Selling Merchandise For A Boost In Earning

Once you have a sufficiently large fanbase of subscribers, you may consider selling some merchandise to them. For musicians this is usually an exclusive hard or digital copy of some of their music or a recorded live stream. Keep in mind that merchandise selling isn’t meant to be your main income source but should be a booster.  

Using YouTube As A Segue For Spotify

The main income of major artists nowadays is no longer from the sale of hard or digital copies of their music but through music streaming platforms like Spotify (the world leader as of 2021).  Getting on Spotify is easy enough, but using YouTube as a way to promote your Spotify channel is a popular tactic that has proven to be highly effective. Simply adding a link in the description of your content on YouTube can be enough to direct listeners to your Spotify playlists, leading you towards success.  

Success as a musician nowadays has changed drastically, and with the widespread use of platforms like YouTube has simplified the road to success. If your music is halfway decent, then there is bound to be people who share your taste in music and enjoy your creativity. The internet has given you the opportunity to cast a wide net in search of fans all over the world, and it can even be used as a gateway towards more traditional measures of success such as radio and other ratings. Use the internet to your favor, and make the most of social media platforms to achieve fame and popularize your music.

Dey Street Books to Publish New Book From Legendary Musician Dave Grohl

Dey Street Books, an imprint of the William Morrow Group at HarperCollins, announced today that they will publish THE STORYTELLER by Grammy-winning musician, documentary filmmaker, and fledgling author Dave Grohl. Dey Street VP and Editorial Director Carrie Thornton negotiated the deal with WME. Grohl is managed by Silva Artist Management. The book will go on sale October 5, 2021 and will also be published in UK & Commonwealth (Simon & Schuster), Finland (Bazar), Germany (Ullstein), Holland (A.W. Bruna), and Italy (Rizzoli).

Dave Grohl has been one of the most beloved and respected figures on the international music scene since his recorded debut with Nirvana on 1991’s generation-defining Nevermind. Grohl took center stage with Foo Fighters’ 1995 self-titled debut, the first of 10 albums in a massive 12-Grammy-winning streak, most recently including the #1 album sales charting Medicine at Midnight. Grohl has traveled the planet doing the thing he loves most—playing rock n roll marathons for tens of thousands of ecstatic Foo Fighter fans. But when the pandemic necessitated going into lockdown, Grohl took stock of how he might use this moment of pause. Channeling his creativity into writing and using his remarkable skill for storytelling, in May 2020 he wrote a moving reflection for The Atlantic on missing the thrill of live music during the Covid era that went viral. Then, ending a longstanding self-imposed exile from social media, Grohl’s new Instagram account @davestruestories was born. This new platform became a way for Dave to share his extraordinary (and funny) stories with fans and fellow music nuts and now, Grohl is set to build upon that momentum with his first book.  

Grohl’s new book is as much a celebration of music as it is about the moments that have molded him into the man he is today. From hilarious childhood mishaps, touching family moments, leaving home to see the world at eighteen, to spectacular stories about Nirvana, Foo Fighters, David Bowie, Joan Jett, Iggy Pop, Paul McCartney, playing drums for Tom Petty on Saturday Night Live, performing at the White House, and even swing dancing with AC/DC, with all love, laughs, loss, and embarrassments along the way, THE STORYTELLER is a fascinating look at a life lived loud. 

“There is a common thread that runs throughout everything that I do: storytelling. Whether in song, documentary film or on the page, I have always felt compelled to share moments from my life. This inclination is a huge part of what excites me creatively but also as a human being. In March 2020, realizing that my day job with the Foo Fighters was going to go on hold, I started an Instagram account (@davestruestories) and decided to focus all of my creative energy on writing some of my stories down, something I love doing but I’ve never really had the time for. I soon found that the reward I felt every time I posted a story was the same as the feeling I get when playing a song to an audience, so I kept on writing. The response from readers was a soul-filling as any applause in an arena. So, I took stock of all the experiences I’ve had in my life-incredible, difficult, funny and emotional-and decided it was time to finally put them into words. Now with the amazing people at Dey Street books I’m excited and honored to announce THE STORYTELLER, a collection of memories of a life lived loud. From my early days growing up in the suburbs of Washington, DC, to hitting the road at the age of 18, and all the music that followed, I can now share these adventures with the world, as seen and heard from behind the microphone. Turn it up!” Grohl says.

“From the second I saw Dave’s first post on Instagram, I knew I was going to publish his book. Well, to be honest, I’ve been hoping to publish Dave Grohl’s book since I became a book editor. I’m a Gen-Xer. I’m from Virginia just like Dave. We grew up listening to a lot of the same music. I’ve always admired his Puckish personality and his awesome musicianship. It turns out that he can write with as much energy and passion as he performs. Plus, he’s a spectacular human who cares deeply about his mom, his family, his bandmates, music, art and the world. All of that passion comes through in his stories and in THE STORYTELLER. I am a lucky editor indeed, but mostly because I get to read the book first,” says Thornton. 

DAVE GROHL is a 16-time Grammy-winning musician and 2-time Emmy-winning director.

Dave Grohl has been one of the most beloved and respected figures on the international music scene since his recorded debut with Nirvana on 1991’s generation-defining Nevermind. Grohl took center stage with Foo Fighters’ 1995 self-titled debut, the first album in massive 12-Grammy-winning catalogue that now includes The Colour & The Shape (1997), There Is Nothing Left To Lose (1999), One By One (2002), In Your Honor (2005), Echoes, Silence, Patience & Grace (2007), Wasting Light (2011), Sonic Highways (2014), Concrete and Gold (2017) and, most recently, Medicine at Midnight (2021).

Grohl has a well-earned reputation as a prolific collaborator: His various endeavors have included “Cut Me Some Slack,” written and recorded with Paul McCartney and Grohl’s Nirvana bandmates Krist Novoselic and Pat Smear; Them Crooked Vultures, formed with Led Zeppelin’s John Paul Jones and Queens of the Stone Age’s Joshua Homme, late legends David Bowie and Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead, as well as Mick Jagger, Neil Young, Elton John, Nine Inch Nails, Roger Taylor and Brian May of Queen, to name a few.

In 2013, Grohl made his debut as a feature director/producer with the acclaimed documentary Sound City. Named for the Van Nuys CA studio where Nirvana recorded Nevermind in 1991, which would sell more than 30 million copies and transform the modern musical landscape. Premiering to unanimous raves at Sundance and achieving a 100% Rotten Tomatoes rating, Sound City focused both on the history of the legendary studio and on the ongoing fight to preserve the human element of music. Hailed by Peter Travers of Rolling Stone as an “exhilarating documentary about what makes life worth living,” by The New York Times as “candy to several generations’ worth of rock fans” and NPR as “a celebration of just how unbelievably awesome it is to make rock music for a living,” Sound City has since been certified as a Gold Longform Video by the RIAA, while the Sound City—Real To Reel companion album took the 2013 Grammys for Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media and Best Rock Song (“Cut Me Some Slack”). 

Grohl also directed the eight-part HBO docuseries Foo Fighters: Sonic Highways, which premiered in October 2014 and went on to win two of the four Emmys for which it was nominated (outstanding sound mixing for nonfiction programming and outstanding sound editing for nonfiction programming). Described by Grohl as a love letter to the history of American music, Sonic Highways was comprised of eight one-hour episodes, each chronicling the creation of one song on Foo Fighters’ Sonic Highways album, each written and recorded in a different American musical landmark — Austin, Chicago, Los Angeles, Nashville, New Orleans, New York, Seattle, and Washington, D.C. 

UK Thrash Metal Heavyweights EVILE Unleash Raging New Song, Featuring American Actor, Comedian & Musician Brian Posehn!

New Album, Hell Unleashed, out April 30, 2021 via Napalm Records
Pre-Order 
HERE

Watch the New Music Video for “Gore” HERE

[photo: Karl Smith]

EVILE are back – straight from the abyss! 

April 30, 2021 will see British thrash titans EVILE release their brand new studio album, entitled Hell Unleashed, via Napalm Records – the band’s first album in eight long years! Since their formation in 2004, EVILE have been turning heads and taking names, delivering four pure thrash offerings blended with an uncompromising death metal assault. Hell Unleashed, the long-awaited successor to their 2013 release Skull, will make no exception – but this time, the album features a new exciting line-up formation of Ol Drake on vocals/guitars and new member Adam Smith of RipTide as rhythm guitarist.

Following the recent release of the blistering album title track from Hell Unleashed, today, the band has released their second single – the sharp and hard-hitting new track “Gore”! With these raging riffs full of anger, EVILE reach another dimension of pure evil, featuring the impressive backing vocals of American actor, comedian and musician Brian Posehn

Watch/listen to the new single “Gore” HERE

EVILE vocalist/guitarist Ol Drake comments:
“Here it is! The second new EVILE single from the upcoming album Hell Unleashed. This is a song about a topic that no other metal band has ever covered before; a serial killer. This song harkens back more to the first EVILE album; it could easily be a track from our beginnings. It’s heavy, it’s fast, it has some great changes, and it will punch you in the face sonically. The overall message of this song/video is that these horrible individuals are hidden in plain sight. They could be our friends, family, or colleagues.

We’re also excited to welcome back the extremely hilarious and extremely metal comedian Brian Posehn. He was kind enough to provide us with some backing vocals in the chorus. Luckily, we only needed the one-word shouting, so we got a great collection of Posehn ‘Gore’s to sift through. Thank you, Brian!

Turn it up LOUD, and enjoy ‘GORE’!

One can be sure, Hell Unleashed is a raucous and masterful thrash metal attack! In just 41 minutes, the album unchains the unbridled forces of hell, catches some rousing demons of the past, and provides classical thrash metal with a contemporary yet hard-edged touch. The newly staffed four-piece strikes again on nine explosive tracks, leaving nothing but a hammering world of sound taken apart by thrash. Endangering guitar lines, which quickly build up to a furious thrash manifesto and attack the eardrum at breakneck speed, meet the merciless velocity EVILE are known and loved for.

Hell Unleashed was produced by Chris Clancy at Backstage Studios, UK, and will not only feature explosive guest backing vocals from Brian Posehn, but also include a cover song:

Ol Drake adds:
“This is the first album EVILE have done to include a cover song in the tracklisting. I’ve been a big fan of death metal for a long time, and seeing as this album is on the more extreme side of thrash vocally and musically, we thought it was a perfect opportunity to cover Mortician‘s ‘Zombie Apocalypse’. It has one of the greatest riffs in it!

We’re also very excited about the return of the legendary Michael Whelan (Sepultura, Obituary, Stephen King) as cover artist. He did the art for our second album and he’s always a pleasure to work with.”

Pre-Order Hell Unleashed NOW:

Tracklist:
1. Paralysed   
2. Gore ( feat. Brian Posehn )
3. Incarcerated           
4. War of Attrition     
5. Disorder     
6. The Thing (1982)    
7. Zombie Apocalypse            
8. Control from Above             
9. Hell Unleashed       

In North America, Hell Unleashed will be available in LP format in black vinyl, as well as in limited edition red vinyl (limited to 200), CD Jewel Case and digital formats. 

Limited Edition Red LP – limited to 200 
In just 41 minutes, Hell Unleashed unchains the unbridled forces of hell, catches some rousing demons of the past and provides classical thrash metal with a contemporary yet hard-edged touch. EVILE are back – straight from the abyss! 

EVILE is:
OL Drake – Vocals & Lead Guitar
Ben Carter – Drums
Joel Graham – Bass
Adam Smith – Rhythm Guitar

Musician J.D. King Discusses His New Album “Moon Gardens”

Musician, Songwriter, Producer and Artist J.D. King has just released a new album titled “Moon Gardens”. Painstakingly recorded over three years on reel to reel analog equipment the album showcases Kings multitude of talents while being backed by an impressive stable of musicians all acting as intricate pieces within this audiophiles dream. Media Mikes had the chance to speak with King recently about the creation of the album, his decision to use only analog equipment and his plans for performing this material live.

Adam Lawton: Can you give us some background on the work that went into “Moon Gardens”?

J.D. King: After I had come off of the Olms project I was doing with Pete Yorne I started really getting in to the use of analog equipment. I wanted to make a 60’s style record the way they did back then. I was studying how album like the Beatles “Revolver” was made and albums like that. We did all the recording via analog and mixed it on tape as I wanted everything to sound just as it would as if it were recorded in the 60’s. I was meditating around eight hours a day and during that time I came up with all these song concepts. I had a good amount of vintage gear to start but then I acquired some more and found a few engineers who could mix on tape in the style that I was going for. We mixed everything live so that was another challenge we were working with as someone basically had to be turning knobs as we were performing. On the song “The Wooden Man” there is a panning part where the engineer was working the panning effect while I was turning some other knobs. With this record I wanted everything to come from the best place it possibly could. Every ingredient had to be the very top. From the musicians, the gear and the performances themselves I wanted the best.

AL: What was it about the 60’s era of recording that captured your interest?

JDK: I am a huge record fan. Even before all this quarantine stuff I would sit with a stack of records and just listen to music all day. I would even listen to some stuff on reel to reel. I never got a good feeling from digitally recorded music. It is less biological to me. I enjoy hearing over tones in music which is something generally missing from digitally recorded music. Honestly I think engineering from those eras was so much better and the standards were much higher.

AL: Working with older equipment did you run into any issues?

JDK: Sometimes we would have gear go down and it wouldn’t just be a simple fix like going to the store and getting a new one. Some of the gear we were using was from as far back as the 1930’s. When a pre-amp or something would go down during the middle of a session we would have to stop and take the time to find someone who was skilled in working on that type of equipment. This did cause some challenges from time to time.

 AL: You worked on this album for three years. Did the writing process take up a majority of that time or was it more from the high level of production you were going for?

JDK: I would generally get my group of session’s guys together once a month to jam and record. The rest of the time I was learning and experimenting with the engineering process as well as writing. I was working basically non-stop. I was wearing a lot of different hats and just had to figure all that stuff out. I think for the most part the time between the two was pretty equal. There were a lot of new things with this record both musically and technically. I wanted to expand and try some new things.

AL: At what point in time did you decide that the record was completed?

JDK: I think right around when I had twelve or thirteen songs. I felt things were rounded out and was happy with what I had. I think when people listen this in an album format it is going to really click. I am an album rock fan and I think that’s was I was able to do with this.

AL: Being that you play quite a few instruments how did you decide which ones you would play and on which tracks?

JDK: I would put the bones of each track down first. From there we would start rehearsing it and bringing the track to life. While doing that I would hear these things that I wanted to add as did the guys I was playing with. Stuff tends to happen in the studio while you are working.

AL: Did you find your creative process changed at all over the course of this record?

JDK: Things stayed pretty much the same for me as they always have been. If you listen to my first record I had a pretty big hand in the production of that record even though it was my first one. Every band I was playing in I always had this ear towards production. Pete (Yorn) is the same way. I learned a lot from him. We tried to work very fast over the course of this record. I have to give to those guys in the sixties as they had to bring their A games. You didn’t want to miss a take as you were recording directly to tape which was expensive. We had a couple tape issues which caused us to have to scrap a couple really good takes. I learned my lesson from that.

AL: With the current pandemic changing a lot of the way things are being done what are your plans to help get this music out to the public given the traditional in-person/live element of music is indefinitely on hold?

JDK: I am kind of lucky in that I learned so much about performing in a studio during this record. It was something you had to do. Having a background in photography I know about lighting and all those things as well so production comes simple for me. Being essentially a one man production crew I can throw up a few cameras and lights and I am set to go. I did a lot of painting over the winter so I can throw those up in the background as well and showcase a lot of my different talents. You can see a lot of what I have going on through my Instagram @mrjdking

Musician Graham Parker talks about working with Judd Apatow on "This is 40"

“This is 40?”  How about This is 62.  While most people his age are thinking about retirement musician Graham Parker is still going strong.

Inspired by his home country’s  Beatles, Parker and some friends formed their first band when he was 13.  After traveling around Europe and playing the occasional gig between jobs he returned to England and began work as a session musician.  In 1975 he formed the band he is most associated with, the Rumour.  Five years later the band broke up but Parker continued as a solo artist, becoming one of the most influential singer/songwriters of his generation.  In 2012 he reunited with the Rumour to produce the album “Three Chords Good.”  The album is classic Parker…great melodies and even greater lyrics (personal favorite:  “Snake Oil Capital of the World”).  In 2012 Parker also added “actor” to his resume’ when he appeared as himself in Judd Apatow’s comedy “This is 40.”  While promoting the upcoming DVD release of the film Parker took time out to speak with Media Mikes about his music, his inspirations and being back with the Rumour.

MIKE SMITH:  How did you become involved with “This is 40?”
GRAHAM PARKER:  Judd (Apatow) came looking for me, actually.  The timing of it….I had just reformed with my first band, the Rumor, to do an album.  We hadn’t recorded it yet but we had it arranged and it wasn’t more than a week or so later that Judd got a hold of my people, as it were, my publishing company people.  I met with him very quickly after that in New York City.  And he talked to me about this part of the plot line about an independent record label…that I would be the kind of act that would get signed to this label.  He elaborated a little bit on that idea…not a great deal…I think he was checking me out, you know?  And a week later he was back on the phone saying “Let’s do all this stuff, man.  I want you in it.”  He brought the Rumor in and we did a two-day shoot with them and then a few days with me doing various things.

MS:  Were you a fan of his films before he contacted you?
GP:  Back in 2001 I heard that one of my songs was going to be used on a television show called “Undeclared.” (NOTE:  the show was created by Apatow)  I entirely missed out on watching it when it aired so I watched the episode.  And I thought “that is a really good show…it’s a great show.”  So I watched a few more episodes on DVD.  Then someone told me I had to see “Freaks and Geeks.”  So I watched that.  And both of those productions were absolutely fabulous.  And from then on Judd was on the map.  I’ve seen most of his films.  “Knocked Up” and “40 Year Old Virgin” stood out…they were such blockbusters you couldn’t get away from them.  But I could tell he was a class filmmaker doing unique kinds of stuff.

MS:  I gave a re-listen to “Three Chords Good” yesterday to prepare for our talk.  After almost forty years of music you continue to be one of the most brilliant lyricists.  Is there anything special that inspires your music?
GP:  It’s hard to tell anymore (laughs).  I still seem to have this drive to cover up my last lot of mistakes as it were.  About six months after I do an album I start thinking back and thinking “I’ve got to do better  than that!”  And I start itching to write songs and clear the deck again.  Clear the deck…do it again…get back on the horse.  Do it all differently.  It just kicks in.  More that than really just having a great deal to say.  I think you have the most to say when you’re under thirty…when all of those interesting synapses are firing, you know?  Things are different now.  I’m not trying to destroy the world or blow people’s minds.  I’m just trying to make very interesting songs and just keep that ball rolling.  And for whatever reason that feeling hasn’t worn off yet, which is just a lucky accident I think.  Unfortunately I’m driven.  The stuff keeps coming.  As soon as we finished the new album I wrote a song and I thought “this is a good start.”  But then I had to stop myself because the album had to be held up for so long…obviously it was a no-brainer to tie it in with the movie’s release.  It was held up for a year.  And in that time I could have written another whole album but I stopped myself because I knew I would not be too excited about promoting THIS record if I’ve got a whole album’s worth of songs in the bag.  I stopped but now I’m back at it.  I’m putting together a few songs and again preparing to do a little tour with the Rumor to coincide with the DVD release.

MS:  With all of the technology available today pretty much anyone can have a recording studio in their home.  Do you think that’s a plus for the music industry…the ability to get so many different sounds out there?
GP:  The days of acts thinking they’re going to sell enough music to make a living are gone, really.  Very few break through into that area….a lot of hard copy sales or download sales.  I do think it’s good that people that might only have a modest chance can do it themselves at home for cheap.  I’m not a techie…I don’t have a lot of studio gear.  I have an Mp3 player that I record on.  I’ve got Garage Band on my computer but I don’t use it.  I’m lucky enough to always be able to get a gig (laughs).  But I do think it’s good that everybody can get a chance to make music.

MS:  After more than three decades you’re back on the road with the Rumor.  Was there any rust when you first got together or was it as if you’d never parted?
GP:  I can’t say there was any rust at all.  We just got right back into it.  It was very heartwarming and encouraging, really, because so much time had passed.  Once we started playing…there’s a symbiosis between us that just locks in.  To illustrate that, there are three of us playing guitar.  I don’t need to play guitar when I’ve got two great guitarists.  There are some songs where I stop playing, thinking I can do it without playing the guitar, and they tell me that my guitar is intracal to it.  And it is.  There are some songs where the three of us just lock in.  It’s a pretty amazing thing.  That just happened instantly.  We recorded the record in nine days.  It was basically done except for a few overdubs and backing vocals.  So that shows you the kind of form we were in.

 

Related Content