Enter to Win a Blu-ray of “MA”

To celebrate the release of Universal Pictures’ “MA” on Blu-ray, Media Mikes would like to our fans a chance to win a Blu-ray combo pack. If you want to win this great prize, please leave a comment with your favorite Octavia Spencer movieThis giveaway will remain open until September 3rd at Noon, Eastern Time. This is open to our readers in US only. One entry per person, per household. All other entries will be considered invalid. Media Mikes will randomly select winners. Winners will be alerted via email.

What starts out as a teenager’s dream turns into a terrifying nightmare in MA, the suspenseful thriller from Blumhouse, the producers of Get Out and Happy Death Day, arriving on Digital August 20, 2019 and on Blu-ray™, DVD and On Demand September 3, 2019 from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment.Fans can now discover more than 20 minutes of thrilling bonus features not seen in theaters including a never-before-seen alternate ending, alternate and deleted scenes, and featurettes that take fans deeper into the unusual and unsettling world of MA.

Starring Oscar® winner Octavia Spencer (The Help, The Shape of Water), the stirring and suspense-filled horror film “makes you cringe in all the right places” (Owen Gleiberman, Variety) and is packed with unexpected twists and turns that will have viewers on the edge of their seat from start to finish.Octavia Spencer delivers an unnervingly daring performance as Sue Ann, a lonely woman who keeps to herself in a quiet Ohio town. When local teenager Maggie (Diana Silvers, Glass) asks Sue Ann to buy booze for her group of friends, she decides to make some new friends of her own and offers her basement for the kids to party.They just have to follow a few simple house rules: Someone has to stay sober, don’t curse, never go upstairs and call her “Ma.” As Ma’s hospitality curdles into obsession,her place goes from the best place in town to the worst place on earth.

 

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Rachael Ma talks about her role in "Robot & Frank"

Rachael Ma stands at just under 5 feet and can currently be seen in the role of the robot opposite Frank Langella in “Robot & Frank”. If you have seen the film you know that Peter Sarsgaard is the voice of the robot but as Rachael puts it “people…literally think the robot IS a robot”. Thanks to Alterian, which is the company behind the LED helmets worn by the electro duo Daft Punk, Rachael gives wonderful life to this role. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Rachael about the film and what she has planned next.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us how you get started acting, singing and dancing?
Rachael Ma: My mom owns a dance studio in Fort Lauderdale, Florida and was a dancer herself. I was born into it. Being a dancer first, it was very easy to channel physicality into acting and singing. Movement tells a story.

MG: How did you get involved with the role of the Robot in “Robot and Frank”?
RM: The whole process was very quick; from my first casting (interview) to the first day of shooting was, only 2 days. Originally, the robot was supposed to be performed by another girl, a friend of the director, and the suit was specifically built to her body specifications. But the first time she tried it on in its entirety, she had a claustrophobia and refused to go back in it. I was a replacement and was brought in mostly because I fit the costume (and was willing to have claustrophobia).

MG: Tell us about the costume itself; was it different to act in?
RM: The heat, lack of vision and immobility of the parts made bringing the robot to life difficult. The robot is all-encapsulating in two layers: the first layer is a thick, rubber unitard that covers everything- head to toe, and then a delicate, fiberglass shell of body parts, including non-ventilated helmet lined in mesh and foam. No breathing room, no A/C, no fans. Just sweat. And wow, it was hot! We shot 12 hour days, outdoors, during a heat wave in the summer for 5 weeks. I was constantly dehydrated, nauseous and fainting. The helmet was another challenge because it was lined with a thick mesh and decreased my vision by about 70%. When we shot at night, I did everything in the blind. The robot joints are clunky and bulky which also made mobility a challenge. As a dancer, I have a fine understanding of controlling movement and to deliver a robot that appeared smooth, grounded and with precise comedic timing in its gestures, was no easy task. I rehearsed and analyzed its walk, its head quirks and wanted to develop certain nuances that made the robot lovable.

MG: Was there any particular scene that sticks out to you?
RM: In one scene I was supposed to catch a mimosa flute that falls off a table- it was no movie magic- I caught that glass out of thin air 13 takes in a row! Clunky robot hand and all! It was miraculous.

MG:Tell us about taking the show “Nutcracker: Rated R” to Tokyo?
RM: I’m in my 4th season of “Nutcracker: Rated R” and am so excited its going to Tokyo. My friends tell me Tokyo is like being in a city in the future, which is kind of funny because I feel like I’ve already been to the future with “Robot and Frank”.

MG: How do you feel that stage differs from film and TV?
RM: Acting for the stage is a whole different beast. Its film/TV acting on steroids. Shifting between stage and screen takes adjustments in my mindset and body, but I always approach whatever work I’m doing thinking of the audiences perspective. It helps me focus on what needs to be seen.

MG: What else do you have planned for 2013?
RM: In 2013 you can expect to see me in New York City’s Broadway/off-Broadway shows, in Tokyo with the raucous ‘Nutcracker: Rated R’, and the occasional film/TV/commercial stint.