How Do You Handle the Aftermath of a Car Accident?

Accidents involving vehicles can be really harmful, car accidents being the most common. Handling the aftermath in the right way is difficult because many people do not know how to go about it. 

People are not aware of when to call the police, who to give a personal statement to, whether or not to go see a doctor because you are feeling okay, when and how they should get their Richmond car accident lawyer involved, or what they should and shouldn’t say to the other party and their insurance company.

Here is a step-by-step guide of how the aftermath of a car accident should be handled:

Get Medical Help

You are advised to get medical help as soon as you can. It is highly important since some of the injuries caused by car accidents are not evident at first and take time to become apparent. Moreover, some injuries require to be treated within due time; for a delay in the treatment is likely to cause severe complications later on. Injuries that don’t represent themselves outwardly include neck, back, and internal injuries

Furthermore, seeking medical attention only helps a legal case later on. If you need to seek compensation for your injuries and other damages, having evidence of needing treatment right away to associate your injuries with the accident is the best scenario to provide evidence in this situation.

Collect Required Evidence

Generally, police are contacted as soon as the collision takes place; however, if you are not able to call the police immediately after the collision, you must contact them once you are admitted in the hospital. 

The police will gather and collect the relevant evidence and ask you to give your statement about the accident. This statement is of high importance and you, at all costs, must avoid giving your statement to someone else other than your car accident lawyer and the police. 

It is advised that if you can, you should take pictures of the damaged area, the vehicle, any injuries you suffered. This will make your case only stronger, especially when you contact your insurance company for the compensation. However, this is recommended only if you are in a state to do it. 

Seek Legal Assistance

This is the most crucial of all steps. The most important thing in the aftermath of a car accident is the compensation. The victim always wants to have full or at least maximum compensation from the insurance company. But such cases can’t be handled single-handedly. The need of an experienced car accident attorney is invaluable.

Car accidents can be brutal and harmful. Many times, both parties suffer severe injuries; however, it is a car accident lawyer’s responsibility to examine the evidence, collect the witness statements, and hold the liable party accountable for the accident.

Other things

These are not necessary, per se. But if you do these things, it can only make your case stronger and more clear the evidence points to the other party being liable:

  • Write down as much as you can remember about your account of the series of events of the accident.
  • Do not unnecessarily admit your fault. You may not be at fault.
  • Avoid talking about the accident with the passersby, the hospital staff, or the other party in the accident.
  • Always have emergency numbers saved on your phone.
  • If you are sure it is not your fault, avoid getting into a fight with the other party.
  • If you are conscious enough, make sure you turn on the hazard lights of your vehicle to let the others know about the accident scene ahead.
  • Do not ever lie about your statement and be factual in whatever you confess.

Film Review: “The Aftermath”

THE AFTERMATH
Starring: Keira Knightley, Jason Clarke
Directed by: James Kent
Rated: Rated R
Running Time: 1 hour 48 minutes
Fox Searchlight

I can still vividly recall the first art-house film I reviewed professionally – the 2000 British drama/comedy “Topsy-Turvy” at the Tivoli Cinemas in the Westport area of Kansas City, MO. Sadly, the Tivoli, an arthouse institution in our fair city for nearly 40 years, has permanently closed its doors. So, it was poetic that the last film I reviewed there would be another period British drama, “The Aftermath.” While it has its share of flaws, “The Aftermath” proved to be a decent swan song before the proverbial final curtain came down at the Tivoli.

Directed by James Kent (“Testament of Youth”) and based upon the 2013 novel of the same name by Welsh author Rhidian Brook, “The Aftermath” is set in Germany just months after the end of World War II. With the ruins of Hamburg as a backdrop, where an estimated 40,000 civilians died in a firestorm created by ten days of heavy Allied bombardment, Rachael Morgan (Keira Knightley) arrives at a train station to meet her husband, British Colonel Lewis Morgan (Jason Clarke). It’s a subdued meeting at best and we can instantly tell that something is amiss between the two.

Colonel Morgan has been assigned to command British forces in Hamburg who are tasked with keeping the peace and helping to rebuild the city. Similar to how the British Empire forced American colonists to house their soldiers, Colonel Morgan and Rachael commandeer the home of widower Stephen Lubert (Alexander Skarsgrd), a former German architect with no love lost for the defeated Nazis. However, the British see all Germans as the enemy just as much as Stephen’s teenage daughter sees all Brits as villains. Colonel Morgan, much to the dismay of Rachael, invites the Luberts to remain in the upper story of their home to avoid sending them to a tent camp in the middle of winter.

Rachael is desperate to have her husband again, but he remains mostly stoic despite the pain he carries with him. In addition to his emotional distance, Colonel Morgan is often called away to deal with Germans protesting over how little there is to eat and increasing guerrilla warfare violence carried by the SS’s, young Germans still devoted to Hitler’s cause. Increasingly starved for affection, the two wounded souls belonging to Rachael and Stephen become drawn to one another despite their differences. The question then becomes can Colonel Morgan save his marriage before Rachael runs away with Stephen.

In a partially successful effort to create suspense, and to give Colonel Morgan something to do besides having awkward conversations with Rachael, the script presents the aforementioned side story of young German men, presumably former members of the Hitler Youth, brandishing the number 88 burned into their arms. “The Aftermath” never goes too in-depth about it, but these 88s are an allusion to a real-life military organization the Nazi hierarchy tried to create towards the end of World War II with a program called “Werewolf.” While the goal was for trained soldiers to commit acts of sabotage behind Allied lines during the war, and to keep up the fight even after it was over, the Werewolf never amounted to anything more than just a lot of propaganda. The members of Werewolf were improperly supplied and more importantly, had little stomach to continue fighting once Nazi Germany had officially surrendered.

The dramatic presentation of the SS in “The Aftermath” murdering British soldiers in a last-ditch effort of defiance is a fallacy. While films do sometimes have to take dramatic license to make a story more entertaining for the masses, the mis-telling of history often leads to misperceptions of actual events and therefore can cause ignorance on a broad scale. I would make the argument that filmmakers who choose to play fast and loose with historical facts in order to liven up a story should state at the end of their creation that what the audience has seen is historical fiction. At least it would be more honest than giving lip service that it has been “inspired by/based upon true events.”

The overall performances are entertaining and there is solid chemistry between Knightley and Clarke. The latter delivers the most powerful scenes of the film playing a man sick of death and destruction. Kent’s pacing is a little choppy at times, but it all leads to a conclusion the audience can savor. “The Aftermath” deserves praise for at least exploring a time frame rarely done before as war movies are usually all about blood, guns and guts. For a refreshing change, we get a tale involving what happens in the aftermath.

Thank you, Tivoli Cinemas. It was a pleasure seeing art-house films there for the past 18+ years. Hopefully the aftermath of your ending won’t be as despairing.

 
Related Content

Blu-ray Review “Aftermath (2017)”

Actors: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Hannah Ware, Kevin Zegers, Scoot McNairy, Mariana Klaveno
Directors: Elliott Lester
Rated: R
Studio: LIONSGATE
Release Date: June 6, 2017
Run Time: 94 minutes

Film: 3.5 out of 5 stars
Blu-ray: 3.5 out 5 stars
Extras: 2 out of 5 stars

I know everyone has been shitty on Schwarzenegger’s films recently but he is really stepping out of his comfort zone with his last two films “Maggie” and now “Aftermath”. They are little indie films that surprisingly deliver solid performances from the Terminator. His glory days may well be gone with starring in huge blockbusters but solid films like this should get him more credit than they have. I say Kudos to him and I hope he does more films like this. Also my boy, Scoot McNairy, deserves a big chance finally. He nails this role (and every other he does as well). He is an amazing actor and deserves a big shot.

Official Premise: Roman’s (Schwarzenegger) life changes forever when he loses his wife and daughter in a plane crash. He attempts to move on from the tragedy but soon finds that he cannot face life without confronting Jake (Scoot McNairy), the air traffic controller responsible for the accident.

Lionsgate delivered “Aftermath” in a combo pack with a Blu-ray disc and a digital copy as well. The 1080p transfer works for the scope of the film, nothing flashy or big here but I like the way it was shot. The DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track also does a good job of building up the suspense throughout. The special features are light and nothing major here. There is an audio commentary with Director Elliott Lester and Producer Eric Watson as well as interviews with Director Elliott Lester and Director of Photography Pieter Vermeer included further discussing the film.