The London Film Industry Remains Resilient During the COVID19 pandemic

The London Film Ind

COVID-19 posed a significant threat to global cinema chains and studios with its potential to decimate box office profits. Cinemas closed their doors, governments placed restrictions on large gatherings and people were advised to stay home.

However, the video production London industry managed to remain resilient during the COVID-19 pandemic and the different challenges it provided for the film industry to overcome.

How Has the Pandemic Affected the industry?

The coronavirus pandemic has had a devastating impact on the global film industry. Many blockbusters and new releases were postponed or even cancelled altogether due to concerns over health risks associated with large gatherings of people in movie theatres.

How has the Industry recovered?

More people are turning to streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime for entertainment, which has had a significant impact on cinemas around the world.

However, film studios are taking the following steps to that assist in managing the success of the London film industry:

  • Careful filming at restricted locations

Wherever possible, studios are utilising to great effect the vacant train stations that are available around London.

With these unused stations, it provides a great avenue for filming important scenes without any interruptions from the public since these stations will be off-limits and not be able to be used for public use, meaning that public mass crowd gatherings can be avoided preventing COVID from being spread.

One of the most famous underground stations that are no longer in public use is Aldwych and previous films that have been filmed at that station include 28 Weeks Later, Darkest Hour, and V for Vendetta

  • Using green screen technology

In cases where social distancing is not possible, studios are using green screen technology to create indoor scenes. This allows them to continue production without having to worry about the potential health risks associated with COVID19.

  • More content for television

Many studios have also begun producing more content for television rather than cinema screens – which means that they are no longer reliant on box office revenue alone.

This has been welcomed by many as an important step forward for British filmmakers who are struggling during these difficult times.

Why is London a key relocation destination?

London is a global centre for media and entertainment, with a rich history of filmmaking. The city has a large pool of talented workers and world-class production facilities.

London has so many talented people with creative skills and the film industry has reacted to the pandemic by providing new opportunities to help train people who were badly affected by the pandemic.

Neil Peplow, BFI director of industry and international affairs, said “At the moment we’re seeing a range of skills that we need in production management and accountancy.

We’re looking at how we can retrain people who are already in these areas because there are lots of shared skill sets with industries which may have been more significantly impacted in terms of job growth than ours.”

An example of successful skills retraining can be demonstrated in Pinewood Studios’ scheme in conjunction with the Department of Work and Pensions to help retrain people from the aviation industry to work in the film industry.

Final Thoughts

Netflix and Amazon Prime’s streaming services have seen a significant rise in use over the past year as people have cut back on going out and seeing films at their local cinemas.

 Many studios are taking advantage of this by still producing high-quality content to cater for this trend. With access to streaming services higher than ever before, the opportunities are endless for studios to continue to create quality content across genres to appeal to their target audiences.

London has many filming benefits and has helped maintain the city to become a constant hub for media and entertainment.

Tommy Blardo and Frank Morin of Enemy Remains talk about their new album “No Faith In Humanity”.

Global Music Award-winning heavy metal group Enemy Remains are set to release their second full-length album on January 20th titled “No Faith In Humanity”. After a lengthy hiatus the band which features original Fates Warning drummer Steve Zimmerman along with Tommy Blardo, Frank Morin, Scott Kadish and Jeff Curtis are ready to unveil their latest creation. Media Mikes had the chance recently to speak with Tommy and Frank about the new albums creation and what it was like reforming the band after their extended break.

Adam Lawton: Can you tell us about the work you have put in on the new album “No Faith in Humanity”?

Tommy Blardo: Funny thing about that, when we signed with Skateboard Marketing we didn’t have one track written for the album, zero, not even ideas. We put a single out, “No Faith in Humanity”, and that’s all we had at the time. It was pretty scary but, I think when you set deadlines it motivates you. Everyone worked really hard on this new album. I wanted to take the band in a whole new direction, new line, new sound, new writing style, new everything! We kind of things a facelift and I think we nailed it.

AL: What were the first couple of writing/rehearsal sessions like after getting back together from your hiatus?

TB: Honestly it was weird, with Steve coming from Fates Warning and playing old prog metal stuff, it was a big change for him, but he was willing to adapt to the new modern style we are going for with hooks but still keeping his roots grounded musically with the off time changes. With the addition of new vocalist Frank “Heretic” Morin, the musical transition seemed to work very well. What Frank has brought to the table just takes so much weight off Steve and I and it really enforces the new sound we were going for.”

AL: At what point did new members come into the picture and, how have they further shaped the new direction of the band?

TB: Frank was added first, I knew we needed a vocalist that could really catch the attention of the listeners with that “radio voice” as they call it – to really fit the new style we had in mind. Scott Kadish (guitars) and Bobby Byrk (keyboards) were added a little later, but were totally involved in the whole writing process. I’ve got to say, this is the strongest line up of professionals we’ve ever had. Band practice has become fun again.”

AL: What can you tell us about the two tracks the band has released thus far from the album?

Frank Morin: I can tell you they were a pain in the ass! Tommy and Steve first approached me with the music to “No Faith In Humanity” and I got really pumped! I had been waiting to jump into a rock/metal project of this caliber for a while, so that song kind of wrote itself based on how I was feeling about the world and the people in it. “Trust in No One” was a little more difficult. It was the first time I played with progressive riffs in a 5 count. It took Tommy and I about an hour to write the hook. Both tracks, like the entire album, touch on personal issues from a singular point of view, though we all share the same ideologies on them. Like the rest of the album we wrote all the music based on the concept, and I just started with the lyrics.

AL: Do you have any touring or performance plans in place to support the release?

TB: At this point we have full press and radio campaigns hitting hard the first week of January and the release of the album is on Jan 20th. After that we have plans to tour the east coast, mid-west and extended dates throughout the west coast by summer. After that hopefully we will be jumping on as a support act for a national artist!

For more info on Enemy Remains you can check out www.facebook.com/enemyremainz

Rise to Remain’s Austin Dickinson talks about new album and tour

 Austin Dickinson is the vocalist for the heavy metal group Rise to Remain. The group is set to release a new full length album titled “City of Vultures” in June. Media Mikes had a chance to talk with Austin recently about the new album and the bands plans for the rest of the year.

Adam Lawton: How would you describe your album “City of Vultures”?
Austin Dickinson: It’s the product of us knocking our heads together and trying to make what we wanted to hear from a new metal band like ourselves: Fast, heavy, emotive, technical, convicted and melodic. I think that we were very meticulous in writing the songs. We wanted the whole thing to flow from beginning to end. In terms of sound, we wanted it to quite simply sound huge! That’s where Colin came in.

AL: What was it like working with producer Colin Richardson?
AD: It was amazing! He’s a huge producer in our genre and one of the best in the world at mixing. It was a massive honor to have him manning the helm along with our co-producer Carl Bown. They were a fantastic team and we’re very proud of the results.

AL: Do you have plans to release any more videos for any of the songs on the album?
AD: Well, apart from the five we’ve done already, we’re constantly throwing the idea around but who knows! Maybe it’s time for some NEW music accompanied by a video? We will never say never that’s for sure.

AL: What do you think makes this album stand out from others in the same genre?
AD: I suppose just because it’s us, it sounds like us, it’s made by us, so in that way I think it sounds pretty signature. Is it better than everything else out there? You’d have to tell me that, because I don’t know. There are some amazing bands out there, and we’re honored to be in the same league as them. Metal has a very strong representation right now.

AL: What are the bands plans for the rest of the year?
AD: We’re about to do Rock Am Ring/Rock in Germany. We just finished Sonisphere in Spain, and then we do Download Festival and continue over to the United States to be part of the Vans Warped Tour! Everything after that is top secret.

 

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Future of History Making Pyramid Sound Studios Remains Uncertain

Future of History Making PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS Remains Uncertain – Bridge Construction Could Put an End to Ithaca New York’s,  Studio’s 35+ Year Legacy 

Touted for Recording ANTHRAX, TESTAMENT, OVERKILL and bevy of local artists.

The fate of PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS, a recording studio world-renowned for spawning the onslaught of American heavy metal in the 1980’s and beyond, has quickly captured the attention of long-time Ithaca, NY residents, recording artists, and friends of business owner Alex Perialas.

At Wednesday’s Planning and Economic Development Committee meeting, several local musicians and educators urged city officials to take demolition of the studio off the table.

PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS, launched by Perialas in 1974, has recorded artists from Bad Religion, Anthrax, Testament, Overkill, Agnostic Front and Brian Wilson to local favorites The Horse Flies and Donna the Buffalo, as well as student projects.PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS is a pinnacle in the local area, being that local musicians do not always have the ability to travel to New York City, Los Angeles, etc. to record their albums. Located directly next to the Clinton St. Bridge, which is undergoing heavy construction until November, the building is at risk of being condemned as a result of the project, stirring alarm among the local and online community.

“This is one of those things that is a state and city project where they’re replacing a 70-year-old bridge and its right in our footprint, if you will. With the building of this new bridge, there’s a chance that if they aren’t careful, they could do damage to the studio,” states owner Alex Perialas. “I’m currently working with the administration to land on an amicable solution to the situation. This has been a landmark facility for years. We pretty much created a style of music here that people had never heard of before. It would be a shame to lose such an integral part of music history due to this temporary construction.”

Jeff Klaus, professor of education at Ithaca College and member of The Horse Flies, addressed the committee Wednesday, “What is housed inside that scruffy building is a building within a building that’s purpose-built to be a studio.”

Klaus and his colleagues noted that 109 E. Clinton St. is a commercial garage space, which is located closest to the bridge project, while the recording studio is located at 105 E. Clinton St. The supporters stressed that the garage and the studio are two separate buildings, though it may not appear so on the outside.

In many ways, both the mayor’s and the common council’s hands are tied, given that the construction on the Clinton St. bridge is federally funded. Earlier this week, supporters of PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS launched an online petition to help save the historical building. Thus far, over 550 people have signed. You can sign the petition at this location.

For more information on PYRAMID SOUND STUDIOS, visit this website:  www.pyramidsoundstudios.com

 

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