Linkin Park Announce One More Light World Tour w/ Special Guest Machine Gun Kelly.

LINKIN PARK ANNOUNCE ONE MORE LIGHT WORLD TOUR
WITH SPECIAL GUEST MACHINE GUN KELLY
FANS GET FIRST ACCESS TO TICKETS THROUGH GROUNDBREAKING
FAN-FIRST TECHNOLOGY

One More Light Album Available Everywhere May 19

North American Tour Begins July 27. Tickets On-Sale May 12.

Photo credit: James Minchin

May 2, 2017 (Los Angeles, CA) – Linkin Park announced their One More Light World Tour today via Genius HERE, a first for both the genre-defying band and the lyric annotation platform.

Produced by Live Nation, the One More Light World Tour with special guest, Machine Gun Kelly, kicks off July 27 in Boston, MA at the Xfinity Center. See itinerary below.

In an effort to put tickets into the hands of real fans, first access to tickets for the One More Light World Tour will be reserved exclusively for fans – not scalpers or bots. The Linkin Park Presale – powered by Ticketmaster Verified Fan, will utilize unique fan-first technology to level the playing field and ensure fans compete against other fans for tickets – not software. The more you participate, the higher your spot in line and the better your access to tickets. Linkin Park Fan Club (LPU) members will get priority, but anyone can work their way to the top.

Pre-sale begins May 9. Fans and LPU members can register for the tour pre-sale right now at https://presale.linkinpark.com/. General on-sale is set for May 12 – for more information visit livenation.com.

Linkin Park will release their highly anticipated seventh studio album, One More Light, May 19 via Warner Bros. Records. The band’s risky creative choices – swinging wildly from song to song, album to album – are a hallmark of their career, and One More Light is no exception. Their most personal to date, the album is built on the stories of six voices coming clean about their lives and struggles, as if it were the first time. OML isn’t bigger, louder, or more avant-garde, it’s more human.

The One More Light World Tour set list will combine the biggest hits of Linkin’s Park expansive career, as well as material from the new album, with all the intense high energy and passion the band is known for. “Our fans know how much love we put into our live show,” says guitarist, Brad Delson. “They know how much we enjoy the connection when we play a fan favorite on stage. The emotional and sonic content of this new batch of songs is going to bring a whole new dimension to the show.”

Every single full-priced ticket purchased for the tour includes a choice of a standard CD or standard digital copy of the One More Light album (a $10.99 value).

Special guest on the tour is EST 19XX/Bad Boy/Interscope recording artist, Machine Gun Kelly. He is set to release his third studio album, bloom, the same day tickets go on sale for the tour – Friday, May 12. The inspiring debut single, “At My Best” featuring Hailee Steinfeld, was the number one most added song at Rhythmic radio, and has received 20.3+ Spotify streams to date. His “Bad Things” single earned Machine Gun Kelly his first #1 song on Pop Radio, peaking at #4 on the Billboard Hot 100.

The One More Light World Tour won’t be the first time Linkin Park and Machine Gun Kelly shared the stage. In 2014, Machine Gun Kelly joined LP for a rendition of “Bleed It Out” on the band’s surprise appearance at the Van’s Warped Tour.

Also joining the tour in Boston, Philadelphia and Uncasville, is one of Japan’s most popular and electrifying live rock bands, ONE OK ROCK.

$1.00 from every full-priced ticket sold on the tour will benefit Music For Relief, the charity foundation Linkin Park founded in 2005 to aid survivors of natural disasters and environmental protection. For further info go to www.musicforrelief.org.

LINKIN PARK ONE MORE LIGHT WORLD TOUR
w/ special guest MACHINE GUN KELLY:
July 27 Boston, MA @ Xfinity Center *
Aug 1 Philadelphia, PA @ BB&T Pavilion *
Aug 2 Bristow, VA @ Jiffy Lube Live *
Aug 5 Uncasville, CT @ Mohegan Sun Arena *
Aug 7 Detroit, MI @ DTE Energy Music Theatre
Aug 8 Toronto, ONT @ Budweiser Stage
Aug 10 Montreal, QC @ Bell Centre
Aug 12 Cincinnati, OH @ Riverbend Music Center
Aug 14 Chicago, IL @ Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre
Aug 15 St. Paul, MN @ Xcel Energy Center
Aug 17 Charlotte, NC @ PNC Music Pavilion
Aug 19 Tampa, FL @ MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Ampitheatre
Aug 20 West Palm Beach, FL @ Perfect Vodka Amphitheatre
Aug 22 Houston, TX @ Toyota Center
Aug 23 San Antonio, TX @ AT&T Center
Aug 25 Dallas, TX @ Starplex Pavilion
Aug 26 Oklahoma City, OK @ Chesapeake Energy Arena
Aug 28 Denver, CO @ Pepsi Center Arena
Aug 30 Phoenix, AZ @ Talking Stick Resort Arena
Sept 1 Lake Tahoe, NV @ Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys
Sept 2 Las Vegas, NV @ MGM Grand Garden Arena
Oct 14 Seattle, WA @ KeyArena **
Oct 15 Vancouver, BC Pepsi Live at Rogers Arena **
Oct 17 Fresno, CA @ Save Mart Center at Fresno State **
Oct 18 San Jose, CA @ SAP Center at San Jose **
Oct 20 San Diego, CA @Mattress Firm Amphitheatre **
Oct 22 Los Angeles, CA @ Hollywood Bowl **

* Dates also with ONE OK ROCK
** Support To Be Announced

NEW YORK AND PENNSYLVANIA TO BE ANNOUNCED AT A LATER DAT FOR TOUR NEWS AND LATEST UPDATES GO TO www.linkinpark.com

Pre-order the album One More Light at www.linkinpark.com and receive 3 instant grat tracks: “Heavy,” “Battle Symphony” and “Good Goodbye” featuring Pusha T and Stormzy.

One More Light album cover art

Linkin Park’s Joe Hahn talks about directing the film “Mall”

Photo Credit: Brandon Cox

Joe Hahn is probably best known as member of the multi-platinum selling rock group Linkin Park. However Joe is an accomplished music video director who recently made the jump to feature film directing. Hahn’s first full length film titled “Mall” is an adaption of the Eric Bogosian book of the same name. The film stars Vincent D’Onofrio, Gina Gershon and Cameron Monaghan and is currently available via Netflix. Media Mikes had the chance to speak with Joe recently about the film and his move to directing full lengths.

Adam Lawton: Can you give us some background on how you got involved with this project?
Joe Hahn: I had come across the script through a mutual friend who was a producer on the film. They worked with Vincent who was working on this project with Eric Bogosian who wrote the book the film is based on. He also was the writer on one of Oliver Stone’s early films titled “Talk Radio” and a bunch of other great things. I think Eric has a very punk rock perspective of Americana. When I read the script I loved it and really thought it was great. I then went and read the book and loved that as well. I liked how the screenplay made since of what was going on in the book without being a carbon copy. I couldn’t put it down and I had all these ideas running through my head. I called my friend up and told him this was perfect and that I knew how to do the film and that it would be very easy for me to do.

AL: Were you able to be free with your direction or did you stay more to the original script?
JH: I definitely stuck to the essence of the script. I think the visual interpretation was my thing. Every person you meet and work with on a film project acts as collaboration. Everyone who touches it is part of the process. There is always added development that each person brings to the table. We all worked together from day one. The templates were all there in screenplay. We did however have to make some tweaks along the way just to have things make a little more sense. It’s all about fine tuning the process.

AL: What do you feel is the defining characteristic of this film that showcases you as the director?
JH: Film is a great way to get someone’s attention for 90 minutes or so. With a full length film you can really get into the details of the story and its characters. With a lot of the music videos and short form things I have done you have to get in and get out as quickly as possible. There is something that is exciting about full length film experience where people can unwind and enjoy themselves. I am a fan of films and the experience so that’s something I want to try and carry over with these long form projects.

AL: Did you notice any major differences when you first started working on this film having come from working mostly on shorts?
JH: I think on the creative side a full length is just a longer version of everything that goes in to a short or music video. With a full length you often have multiple story lines happening and a variety character dynamics. You have to figure out how to make all of that fit in with how the film is written. I think when something is really well written you can use that as your master template and then the details come along to help make sense of everything. The biggest difficult I think in all of this is the logistics portion of things. The creative stuff is the fun part and something that comes naturally for me. The business side of things is where it becomes difficult for me. There’s just so much going on and so many different people involved on that front that it can be hard at times.

AL: When it came time to edit the film how did that process work for you?
JH: We did do some rearranging during the editing process. We also did a bit of voice over work as well. We actually came back later and did a majority of that after shooting was completed. After seeing the first cut of the film I felt that the films main character was Jeff played by Cameron Monaghan. We see his experiences as the film progresses and you start to wonder if what’s happening could or could not be in Jeff’s imagination. As you watch this character you sort of see how he reacts in certain situations and it makes you wonder.

AL: Looking back on the finished product. What are your feelings towards it and is directing something you would do again?
JH: There are certain moments where things feel perfect. Being creative through music, art and film has a very Zen like feeling for me. I can totally dive into projects and enjoy myself while working with people I can challenge. The whole process is very enjoyable. I am fortunate enough to where I can do different things and I hope to be able to keep doing the things I love as time goes on.

Linkin Park’s Chester Bennington & Mike Shinoda talk about new album “The Hunting Party”

Photo Credit: Brandon Cox

Linkin Park recently released their sixth studio album titled “The Hunting Party”. The album is a departure from the groups more recent electronic-rock style albums however it is still very much Linkin Park. Media Mikes spoke recently with the groups front men Mike Shinoda and Chester Bennington about the bands direction shift, the new albums unique sound and the bands upcoming tour.

Adam Lawton: Can you tell us a little bit about the shift in direction the band took with the new album and how it has been received by fans thus far seeing it was your first album not to go to number 1 here in the States?
Mike Shinoda: When we were making the album, I had a handful of demos that weren’t quite as heavy as this. They were a little more electronic-driven, and there was just a day that I was looking for something to listen to and I couldn’t find what it was that I wanted. I wanted something more aggressive and energetic and I just kept finding either stuff that was modern and progressive and the only stuff I was finding that was modern and progressive tended to be a little more mellow and if it was heavier, it tended to sound more progressive. I think we all found that there was just a style that was kind of being underserved that we wanted to hear and that’s what we decided to make. As far as the reception goes it debuted at #1 in 67 countries. Friends of mine here in the U.S. said, “Hey, I heard it. Sorry that you guys didn’t get to number one on the charts” I feel like the billboard chart is for one thing. It’s for the first week album sales, and this is not really a first week album sales kind of album. It’s a statement album. It’s a live album and an album that should be taken to the stage. That’s exactly what we’re planning to do right now with the Carnivores Tour.
Chester Bennington: It’s funny because I think probably more so than any other record, maybe other than possibly “A Thousand Sons” I feel like critically the record’s been overwhelmingly positive. I have yet to read anything negative about the record on a critical level that has been written, which is pretty amazing, and so for that we’re very grateful. But at the same time, almost on a daily basis I run into Linkin Park fans and I’ll take pictures or say, “Hi,” whatever, and every single person that I’ve met since we released this record has told me that they love the record. They are super happy that it’s out like it is. I’ve heard some other guys in the band say that they feel like it is a record that really the genre needed and that they also appreciate the record that we’ve made, that it is progressive and it is something that they want to listen to. I feel like we have accomplished our goal on this album. I think not only creatively, but personally for the band, but also for a lot of our fans.

AL: Was there initially a lot of reluctance or resistance to make a harder record? Or do you feel like the rest of the band bought in pretty quickly?
MS: For me, it was a bit of a process. I felt like Chester was on board from the beginning but it was still, like, figuring out at that point what we were. Conversations were happening mid-tour last album like, what does a louder record mean? What is bringing energy to the album and what does that mean? How do we do that without it sounding throwback or derivative of heavier stuff that we grew up with. At first it fell on me to kind of find the right tone, so that I could take that to, in particular Brad and Rob, and say, “You guys, like, I know this is something that you don’t naturally gravitate towards at this point in your life, but check out these reference points.”

AL: This was your first self produced album which you chose to recorded via analog tape. Is this something that you see the band doing again?
MS: Yes. I think it’s something that we’ve been curious about for awhile but it had to be the right moment to really dive into it. I’ve had a little bit of experience with tape on previous projects, but not really cutting such large chunks of the song and large performances to tape. It’s was so nice because it forces you to slow down and really consider each performance and each recording of whoever’s playing at the time. It’s definitely something we have experience with now and we could potentially go back and use it again, if the song asks for it.
CB: I’ve been recording the drums in this way. It’s really great in that it does give the feel of the song. It’s a more live feel. For us, I think one of the things that’s always been surprising to a lot of people when they come to see us for the first time, especially my musicians’ friends. There’s raw kind of more prompt and in your face attitude about the band when you see us live. Like, even like our mellower songs; there’s an edge to them that you get in a live performance that kind of gets lost in the studio. I think that with this record we’ve captured a lot more of what we’re like live in the sound of the record and I think that’s very exciting.

AL: With there being a two year gap between your previous albums was there ever a time in the recording process that you guys were worried maybe you went too far with the new sound and that it might alienate some fans?
MS: I think since “Minutes to Midnight” we’ve kind of had this conversation. We knew that when we went into “Minutes to Midnight” that it was going to be different. We wanted it to be extremely different. We knew that it was going to be a risk to take and we could potentially alienate our entire fan base.
CB: Our goal is to make good songs and some are great song. If we accomplish our goal, it will be almost impossible to alienate everybody. Luckily for us a lot of our fans have come along for the ride on the last two records and we really did go and stretch our wings to see how far we could take these. For us going through that process of trying things and making sure that we’re creatively excited and energized helps us create music that still sounds like Linkin Park regardless of what vibe the song is. I think for people to get hung up on us not speaking to a specific sound is kind of a silly idea anyway, considering that we’ve never really been a single genre type of band. I think that going through that process is really a lot of being able to be creative on a heavy record like this. I don’t think we could have been as creative with the guitar or the drums 12 years ago because we’ve kind of gone around and tried new things and kind of alienated ourselves and some of our band.

AL: Were the guest performers on the album brought in to counter balance the bands new sound in anyway?
 MS: The addition of those guys was, in most cases, pretty late in the game. I mean, if you’re just talking about from a fan recognition standpoint, then, sure, if somebody sees the guests names on there, they kind of know what they’re getting
CB: I don’t think those who appeared on the record would have been into working with us if that was the goal. though. If we were coming at this from the idea of “Hey, let’s go work with these people and then that’ll make the record even more cool.” But that’s a weird way of looking at what we do anyway and it’s kind of the opposite of what our intention would ever be. When we do collaborations it’s coming from a holistic place. It’s got to come from a very open, spontaneous kind of grassroots way. It can’t be forced or thought of in a boardroom and written down on a piece of paper. That’s just not the way that anything creative usually gets done.

AL: $1 for every ticket sold is going to benefit your organization; Music for Relief. What can you tell me about the organization and why are you guys passionate about it?
MS: Music for Relief started in the mid-2000’s as a response to the Indian Ocean tsunami. We had just been out touring in Asia. When we got home we were watching the news and the whole place had been destroyed. We just felt like we needed to do something. Music for Relief had been around for a year and we realized that we were actively involved in cleaning up messes, but not so much involved in anything preventative. So, we added an environmental component to Music for Relief, and all in all, I mean, we’ve done projects all over the world. We’ve worked with the UN. We’ve worked with Habitat for Humanity and Direct Relief and the Red Cross and put on concerts with No Doubt and Jay-Z. Most recently we did an awesome show with Offspring and Bad Religion. Travis Barker came out with us and it was just so much fun. This is an ongoing effort that we hope to involve more musicians with. Music for Relief isn’t about Linkin Park. Unfortunately there are always disasters to go get involved after and there are also environmental causes that we can get involved in to help prevent the natural disasters or at least keep our oceans and our land and air clean. The bottom line is Music for Relief is being built up as something that creates trust with the fans. We create trust with the musicians and the industry and let people know that this is a group that does work hard to make sure all the I’s are dotted, or the T’s are crossed.