Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection First Time Ever on Blu-ray!

FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, A LANDMARK COLLECTION SHOWCASING THE LEGENDARY MONSTERS IN MOTION PICTURE HISTORY

UNIVERSAL CLASSIC MONSTERS: COMPLETE 30-FILM COLLECTION AVAILABLE ON BLU-RAY ON AUGUST 28, 2018 FROM UNIVERSAL PICTURES HOME ENTERTAINMENT

Universal City, California, August 22, 2018 – Thirty of the most iconic cinematic masterpieces starring the most famous monsters of horror movie history come together on Blu-ray™ for the first time ever in the Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection on August 28, 2018, from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. Featuring unforgettable make-up, ground-breaking special effects and outstanding performances, the Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection includes all Universal Pictures’ legendary monsters from the studio that pioneered the horror genre with imaginative and technically groundbreaking tales of terror in unforgettable films from the 1930s to late-1950s.

From the era of silent movies through present day, Universal Pictures has been regarded as the home of the monsters. The Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection showcases all the original films featuring the most iconic monsters in motion picture history including Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, The Invisible Man, The Bride of Frankenstein, The Wolf Man, Phantom of the Opera and Creature from the Black Lagoon. Starring some of the most legendary actors including Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Jr., Claude Rains and Elsa Lanchester in the roles that they made famous, these films set the standard for a new horror genre and showcase why these landmark movies that defined the horror genre are regarded as some of the most unforgettable ever to be filmed.

Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection includes a 48-page collectible book filled with behind-the-scenes stories and rare production photographs and is accompanied by an array of bonus features including behind-the-scenes documentaries, the 1931 Spanish version of Dracula, Featurettes on Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Jr., and Jack Pierce, 13 expert feature commentaries, archival footage, production photographs, theatrical trailers and more. The perfect gift for any scary movie fan, the collection offers an opportunity to experience some of the most memorable horror films of our time.

The Universal Classic Monsters: Complete 30-Film Collection includes Dracula(1931), Frankenstein (1931), The Mummy (1932), The Invisible Man (1933), The Bride of Frankenstein (1935), Werewolf of London (1935), Dracula’s Daughter (1936), Son of Frankenstein (1939), The Invisible Man Returns (1940), The Invisible Woman (1940), The Mummy’s Hand (1940), The Wolf Man (1941), The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942), The Mummy’s Ghost (1942), The Mummy’s Tomb (1942),Invisible Agent (1942), Phantom of the Opera (1943), Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943), Son of Dracula (1943), House of Frankenstein (1944), The Mummy’s Curse (1944), The Invisible Man’s Revenge (1944), House of Dracula (1945), She-Wolf of London (1946), Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948)Abbott and Costello Meet the Invisible Man (1951), Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954, and includes a 3D version), Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955), Revenge of the Creature (1955 and includes a 3D version) and The Creature Walks Among Us (1956).

 

BONUS FEATURES:

  • Behind-the-Scenes Documentaries
  • 3D Versions of Creature from the Black Lagoon and Revenge of the Creature
  • 1931 Spanish Version of Dracula
  • Featurettes on Bela Lugosi, Boris Karloff, Lon Chaney Jr., and Jack Pierce
  • 13 Expert Feature Commentaries
  • Archival Footage
  • Production Photographs
  • Theatrical Trailers

 

Athletes to Actor – The 10 Who Did It Best

Article by Adam Walter

There is a long history of athletes turning to acting after their playing days are over. In fact, many of them get a jump start by acting while they’re still in the midst of their careers. Most of them have been forgettable, but some athletes have gone on to become serious actors or at least leave a lasting impression upon the landscape of popular culture. This is the list of the best athletes turned actors.

10. Bob Uecker

Okay, so maybe calling Uecker an athlete is a stretch when you look at his career .200 batting average, but the man did last six seasons in Major League Baseball. He will always most famously be remembered for his hilarious announcing in the Major League movies.

9. Carl Weathers

Weathers is most widely known for portraying Apollo Creed in the Rocky Franchise. Before he became famous for fighting and training Rocky Balboa, Weathers played linebacker for two seasons at San Diego State, 7 games for the Oakland Raiders and a couple years in the CFL.

8. Jim Brown

Brown’s name is often thrown around in the lists of best athletes in history. He is the only man to average over 100 yards per game for his entire NFL career. After his playing days were over, Brown turned to acting. His most famous role was in The Dirty Dozen.

7. Merlin Olsen

Although kids from the 80’s will undoubtedly remember Olsen most from his role as Ingalls’ family friend Jonathan Garvey on “Little House on the Prairie,” he was one of the best defensive tackles in the history of football. He made the Pro Bowl the first 14 years of his 15-year NFL career, which is a Pro Bowl selection streak that is only matched by Bruce Matthews, Tony Gonzalez and Peyton Manning.

6. Johnny Weissmuller

Weissmuller won five gold medals and a bronze for swimming in the 1924 and 1928 Summer Olympics. He then went on to portray Tarzan in 11 films, starting in 1932. Following that, Weissmuller starred in 13 movies as a famous Asian hunter called Jungle Jim.


5. Alex Karras

Karras was a star offensive lineman for the Detroit Lions over 12 seasons in the NFL. He went on to star in many TV shows and movies, most famously as Mongo in Blazing Saddles and George Papadopoulos on “Webster”.

4. Chuck Norris

Most recognizable by Millennials for the Internet memes referencing his legendary feats, Norris was an action star who is most famously known onscreen for fighting Bruce Lee in Way of the Dragon and portraying the title character in “Walker, Texas Ranger.”

3. Burt Reynolds

Reynolds was a star fullback coming out of high school, but he hurt his knee at Florida State in his sophomore year and never fully recovered. He turned to acting and became one of the biggest movie stars of the 1980s in films like Deliverance, Smokey and the Bandit and The Longest Yard.

2. Bruce Lee

The most famous kung fu movie star ever is also considered by many to be the best martial artist of all time. His most famous films were The Big Boss, Way of the Dragon and Enter the Dragon.

1. Arnold Schwarzenegger

A star so big he is instantly recognizable from his first name alone, Arnold is one of the biggest box-office stars in Hollywood history. In films such as Predator, Kindergarten Cop and The Terminator franchise, Schwarzenegger delighted audiences. Before he became an action hero, Schwarzenegger initially gained fame as one of the most successful bodybuilders ever. He won the title of Mr. Olympia seven times.

Media Mikes is proud to welcome Adam Walter. Adam is recently out of college and makes his home in New York City. His love of sports led to he and some friends starting an Internet blog. You can read more of his work at www.usssportsmachine.com. Welcome aboard!

Mary Tyler Moore Honored With 2011 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

Mary Tyler Moore Honored With 2011 Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award

48th Annual Accolade to be Presented During the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® Simulcast Live on TNT and TBS on Sunday, January 29, 2012

LOS ANGELES (September 8, 2011) – Renowned actress, producer and humanitarian Mary Tyler Moore will receive Screen Actors Guild (SAG)’s most prestigious accolade – the Screen Actors Guild Life Achievement Award. Moore created a new paradigm for female leads in television, won top honors for her courageous performances in film, television and on stage, produced some of the most lauded television programs of all time, and for thirty years, has served as a tireless advocate giving hope to all those afflicted with Type 1 diabetes.

Moore will be presented the Award, given annually to an actor who fosters the “finest ideals of the acting profession,” at the 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards®, which premieres live on TNT and TBS on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2012, at 8 p.m. ET, 7 p.m. CT, 6 p.m. MT and 5 p.m. PT.

In making today’s announcement, Screen Actors Guild National President Ken Howard said, “Mary Tyler Moore won our hearts as Laura Petrie and Mary Richards, our respect as her production company became synonymous with quality television, our awe as she tackled difficult subject matter in film and on Broadway, and our admiration she turned her public recognition into a catalyst to draw attention to critical and deeply personal health and social issues. She truly embodies the spirit behind SAG’s Life Achievement Award, and we are honored to proclaim her as its 48th recipient.”

Holder of seven Emmys®, a Tony® and an Academy Award® nomination, among numerous industry and philanthropic accolades, Mary Tyler Moore first rose to prominence when she was cast at 23 as Dick Van Dyke’s wife in his eponymous sitcom, based loosely on the experiences of comedy writer Carl Reiner. Smart, feisty and down-to-earth in capri pants and fashionable tops, Moore’s Laura Petrie was new kind of television wife and mother. The audiences loved her and the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences awarded her two Emmys and a nomination during the show’s five-year run.

Following “The Dick Van Dyke Show’s” successful run, Moore combined her acting, singing and dancing talents in 1967 as Julie Andrew’s co-star in the 1920’s film musical “Thoroughly Modern Millie.” She was Elvis Presley’s final leading lady in 1969’s “Change of Habit” and the same year made her television movie debut in the drama “Run A Crooked Mile.”

When CBS beckoned with the offer to develop her own television series, Moore formed a production company, MTM, with her then husband Grant Tinker. Their groundbreaking comedy “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” premiered on September 19, 1970. While other comedies had been set in the workplace, Moore’s chronicled the career, friendships and dating life of a single, thirtyish, spunky, independent, career woman, in the unseen world of local TV news. With a brilliant cast, the character-driven series redefined the meaning of ensemble comedy and of family. In its seven-year run garnered 29 Emmys, including four for its star. Nearly 25 years later Moore was present as TV Land dedicated a statue in downtown Minneapolis depicting the iconic moment in the show’s opening credit’s when a hopeful Mary Richards tosses her hat in the air.

Moore and Tinker’s MTM Enterprises continued to produce an impressive list of landmark comedies and dramas including “The Bob Newhart Show”, “Newhart, “WKRP in Cincinnati,” “Hill Street Blues” “The White Shadow” (starring current SAG president Ken Howard) and “St. Elsewhere,” Characters from “The Mary Tyler Moore Show” became the focus for several successful spin-offs in the 1970s: “Rhoda,” starring Valerie Harper; “Phyllis,” starring Cloris Leachman; and “Lou Grant,” starring Ed Asner (SAG’s 38th Life Achievement recipient), which significantly took Asner’s gruff but soft-hearted journalist from TV newsroom comedy into a hard-hitting newspaper-set drama.

Moore showcased her dramatic talent in her Emmy-nominated depiction of TV correspondent Betty Rollin’s battle with breast cancer in the 1978 CBS telefilm “First You Cry.” In 1980 Moore was nominated for an Oscar® for her riveting portrayal of Beth Jarrett, a bitter mother coping with the death of one son and the attempted suicide of another in the Robert Redford-directed drama “Ordinary People.” The same year she continued to explore painful subject matter onstage in the hit Broadway play “Whose Life Is It, Anyway?” which earned her a Tony for playing a quadriplegic sculptor fighting to determine her own destiny, a role originated by Tom Conti and rewritten for its female star in her Broadway debut.

Other feature films include: “Six Weeks,” opposite Dudley Moore; David O, Russell’s “Flirting with Disaster”; and Peter Calahan’s dark comedy Against The Current, opposite Joseph Fiennes and Justin Kirk, which premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival.

Moore’s success in telefilms has continued across decades: In 1984, she delivered an Emmy-nominated performance in the ABC television movie “Heartsounds” opposite James Garner (SAG’s 41st Life Achievement recipient),; received a Cable Ace nomination for HBO’s “Finnegan Begin Again” opposite Robert Preston and Sam Waterson; delivered a stunning portrayal of disturbed first lady Mary Todd Lincoln in the 1988 NBC miniseries “Gore Vidal’s Lincoln;” and won her seventh Emmy in 1993 for her performance as a spinster trafficking in illegal adoption in Lifetime’s “Stolen Babies.”

Other telefilm credits include TNT’s “Miss Lettie and Me” and the CBS television films “Like Mother, Like Son: The Strange Story of Sante and Kenny Kimes”; “Snow Wonder”; and “Blessings” based on the Anna Quindlan novel. She and Dick Van Dyke showcased their old spark in a PBS version of D. L. Coburn’s Pulitzer Prize-winning nursing home-set stage play “The Gin Game,” then reunited with a large number of their former cast mates in TV Land’s nostalgic “The Dick Van Dyke Show Revisited.”

Moore’s television guest roles include: a recurring run as Tea Leoni’s mother “The Naked Truth,” an appearance as Ellen DeGeneres’s Aunt Mary in a Christmas episode of “Ellen,” a recurring stint as a high-strung TV host on “That 70’s Show” and a multi-episode arc in NBC’s “Lipstick Jungle.” This year, on the season premiere of “Hot in Cleveland,” Moore reunited onscreen with Betty White for the first time since “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” sharing a jail cell with White’s character, Elka, who was arrested in the season one cliffhanger.
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Moore returned to the stage in 1987 to star opposite Lynn Redgrave in A. R. Gurney Jr.’s “Sweet Sue” and has performed numerous benefit readings of Gurney’s two-person “Love Letters,” starring opposite James Earl Jones to benefit, the Poughkeepsie Day School, Patrick Stewart to benefit the Ethical Culture School and Gene Wilder for the North Shore Child and Family Guidance Center Association, as well as opposite Gurney himself.

Moore’s first autobiography, “After All,” published in 1995, was a frank exploration of her childhood, personal challenges and career. Her second book, “Growing Up Again: Life, Loves, and Oh Yeah, Diabetes” is a candid, humorous and illuminating detailing of her battles with the disease since she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes (then called “juvenile diabetes” for its prevalence among children) in 1970 at age 33. The book includes conversations with remarkable people who live with the disease and those who work on the frontiers of medical research. Moore donated all her profits from “Growing Up Again” to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF), the world’s leading funder and advocate for Type 1 diabetes science.

Moore has been JDRF’s International Chairman since 1984. She has also chaired JDRF’s biennial Children’s Congress since its inception in 1999, leading up to 200 children with Type 1 diabetes to Washington, D.C. to meet face-to-face with congressional representatives. Moore has been at the vanguard of JDRF’s visit on Capitol Hill, testifying before the House and Senate on behalf of increased National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for Type 1 diabetes, which affects as many as 3 million children and adults. Moore and her husband, Dr. S Robert Levine, have been generous supporters of JDRF’s research programs and in 2003 established JDRF’s “Excellence in Clinical Research Award” in recognition of outstanding diabetes researchers. She herself was honored by JDRF in 2007 with its Humanitarian of the Year Award.

Among many other accolades, Moore received the 1984 Women in Film Crystal Award, was immortalized in 1992 with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, was presented with the American Screenwriters Association first David Angell Humanitarian Award in 2002 and in 2009 was honored with the National Association of Broadcasters Distinguished Service Award.

Moore co-founded Broadway Barks with Bernadette Peters in 1999. The annual event held in Broadway’s Shubert Alley promotes the adoption of shelter animals, seeks to end euthanasia of dogs and cats in New York City and fosters a spirit of community among the number shelters and rescue groups working throughout the city. New York Major Michael Bloomberg proclaimed this year’s July 9, 2011, event as “Broadway Barks Day.”

The Brooklyn-born daughter of George Tyler Moore and Marjorie Hackett, Moore, Moore had moved with her family to California at 8 and aspired to be a dancer. After graduating Immaculate Heart High School, she broke into commercials, then gained acting credentials in television, first as the only partially-glimpsed switchboard operator on “Richard Diamond, Private Eye” and in guest roles in more than a dozen popular series, such as ““Hawaiian Eye,” “77 Sunset Strip,” and “Wanted: Dead or Alive.”

The 18th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards will be produced by Jeff Margolis Productions in association with Screen Actors Guild Awards®, LLC. Jeff Margolis is the executive producer and director. Kathy Connell is the producer. JoBeth Williams, Daryl Anderson, Scott Bakula, Shelley Fabares and Paul Napier are producers for SAG. Gloria Fujita O’Brien and Mick McCullough are supervising producers. Benn Fleishman is executive in charge of production. Rosalind Jarrett is the Executive in Charge of Publicity. Jon Brockett is the Awards Coordinating Producer.

Screen Actors Guild is the nation’s largest labor union representing working actors. Established in 1933, SAG has a rich history in the American labor movement, from standing up to studios to break long-term engagement contracts in the 1940s to fighting for artists’ rights amid the digital revolution sweeping the entertainment industry in the 21st century. With 20 branches nationwide, SAG represents more than 125,000 actors who work in film and digital theatrical motion pictures and television programs, commercials, video games, corporate/educational, Internet and all new media formats. The Guild exists to enhance actors’ working conditions, compensation and benefits and to be a powerful, unified voice on behalf of artists’ rights. Headquartered in Los Angeles, SAG is a proud affiliate of the AFL-CIO.

TNT, one of cable’s top-rated networks, is television’s destination for drama. Seen in 100.5 million households, the network is home to such original series as The Closer, starring Emmy® winner Kyra Sedgwick; Rizzoli & Isles, starring Angie Harmon and Sasha Alexander; Falling Skies, starring Noah Wyle; Franklin & Bash, with Mark-Paul Gosselaar and Breckin Meyer; Leverage, starring Timothy Hutton; Southland, from Emmy-winning producer John Wells; and Memphis Beat, starring Jason Lee and Alfre Woodard, as well as the upcoming series Major Crimes, Dallas and Perception. TNT also presents compelling original movies, including a slate of thrillers set to premiere this fall in The TNT Mystery Movie Night showcase. TNT is the cable home to powerful dramas like The Mentalist, Bones, Supernatural, Las Vegas, Law & Order, CSI: NY, Cold Case and, starting next year, Castle; primetime specials, such as the Screen Actors Guild Awards®; blockbuster movies; and championship sports coverage, including NASCAR, the NBA and the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championship. TNT is available in high-definition.

TBS, a division of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., is television’s top-rated comedy network and is available in 100.8 million households. It serves as home to such original comedy series as “Are We There Yet?” Tyler Perry’s “House of Payne,” Tyler Perry’s “Meet the Browns” and the upcoming Tyler Perry’s “For Better or Worse; the Emmy®-nominated late-night series “CONAN,” starring Conan O’Brien; hot contemporary comedies like “Family Guy,” “The Office,” and “The Big Bang Theory,” which begins later this year; special events, including star-studded comedy festivals in Chicago; blockbuster movies; hosted movie showcases and championship sports.

Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner company, creates and programs branded news, entertainment, animation and young adult media environments on television and other platforms for consumers around the world.

 

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Michelle Danner Teaches at The Actor’s Golden Box

July 25, 2011

The Actor’s Golden Box at the Acting Studio at Edgemar Center for the Arts Taught by Renowned Acting Coach Michelle Danner

Each month, The Acting Studio at Edgemar Center for the Arts in Santa Monica  presents The Actor’s Golden Box, a two-day intensive program of training taught by renowned acting coach Michelle Danner.

Actors learn how to create vivid, fleshed-out and interesting characters through an intense and emotional workshop with technique exercises and lectures. Not just for actors, the course is also of benefit to writers and others in allied professions.

The class is supported by film clips and there are discussions and analyses of performances by Meryl Streep, Judi Dench, Anthony Hopkins, Al Pacino, Marlon Brando, James Dean and others.

Exercises include learning how to build provocative and complex back stories by opening up your instrument emotionally and finding triggers and psychological gestures in your work.

Danner, Artistic Director of the Edgemar Center for the Arts, has coached some of Hollywood’s most elite actors including James Franco, Salma Hayek, Gerard Butler, Chris Rock, Penelope Cruz, Isla Fisher and more. She has directed and acted in over 30 plays and musicals in Los Angeles and New York, and has directed two films, “How to Go Out on a Date in Queens” (starring Jason Alexander and Rob Estes) and the recently-completed “Hello Herman” (starring Norman Reedus and Martha Hagerida).

The Actor’s Golden Box is conducted once each month on a Saturday and Sunday at Edgemar Center for the Arts. Please call (310) 392-0815 for exact dates, times and registration information.

The Acting Studio at Edgemar Center for the Arts is located in a two-theatre and art gallery complex in Santa Monica. The address is 2437 Main Street, Santa Monica, California 90405.

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Background

Michelle Danner and Larry Moss founded Edgemar Center for the Arts, a two-theatre and art gallery complex in 2000. The Larry Moss Studio has been housed at Edgemar since the cutting of the ribbon in 2002 and has flourished and grown into what is now The Acting Studio at Edgemar.

Classes offered in The Acting Studio at Edgemar Center for the Arts:

* The Actor’s Golden Box: with renowned acting coach Michelle

Danner
* Audition for Film & Television: On-Camera
* Scene Study Beginning/Intermediate/Advanced
* Improv Workout
* Casting Director Workshop
* Voice Intensives Level 1 & Level 2

*Brad Garrett, the Emmy Award winning star of “Everybody Loves Raymond”
will teach a six week sitcom/comedy intensive starting July 26th.

Free info sessions are held every Thursday 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

 

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