SEVENDUST ANNOUNCE LUCKY ALBUM #13 BLOOD & STONE SCHEDULED FOR RELEASE ON OCTOBER 23rd

New Album Now Available for Pre-Order at https://RiseRecords.lnk.to/BloodAndStone

On the heels of the current single “The Day I Tried To Live” moving up the radio charts, heavy metal legends Sevendust are announcing their 13th studio album Blood & Stone. The new album is scheduled for release on October 23rd via Rise Records (the second for the band on the label). The latest release also marks a return for the band with producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette, known for his work with Alter Bridge; Tremonti; Slash; and others. Blood & Stone is available for pre-order in various configurations at https://RiseRecords.lnk.to/BloodAndStone

From the pulsating intro of album opener “Dying To Live” to the now popular album closer “The Day I Tried To Live,” Sevendust continue to push the sound they have made their own for more than 25 years. Tracks like “Love,” “Blood From A Stone,” “Kill Me” and “Against The World” showcases why the band has been adored by fans and critics alike. Lajon Witherspoon, Clint Lowery, John Connolly, Vince Hornsby and Morgan Rose have raised the bar with Blood & Stone. The new music fits perfectly alongside with the bands most seminal tracks that have become the cornerstone of the band’s live performances.

L to R: Morgan Rose, Clint Lowery, Lajon Witherspoon, Vince Hornsby, John Connolly
(Photo Credit: Travis Shinn/Chuck Brueckmann)
The track listing for Blood & Stone is:
1) Dying To Live
2) Love
3) Blood From A Stone
4) Feel Like Going On
5) What You’ve Become
6) Kill Me
7) Nothing Left To See Here Anymore
8) Desperation
9) Criminal
10) Against The World
11) Alone
12) Wish You Well
13) The Day I Tried To Live
Recently, Sevendust impacted rock radio and unveiled a lyric video for their cover of the Soundgarden classic “The Day I Tried To Live.” The song is currently moving up the charts and the reaction to the track has been overwhelmingly favorable to the unique interpretation the band put on the classic track. The lyric video for the song was created by Wayne Joyner (known for his work with Dream Theater). It features a lone figure walking down a road thinking about his life with clips of the band woven throughout.

The video can be seen here: https://youtu.be/YhUUO_S4bpA.

In 1994, Sevendust first forged a familial tie amongst each other that translated into one of the most diehard audiences in the game. To this day, the connection between fans and the GRAMMY® Award-nominated gold-certified hard rock outfit only grows stronger. A trifecta of now-classic gold albums—Sevendust [1997], Home [1999], and Animosity [2001]— ignited their journey.

Known as an equally intense and unforgettable live force, they’ve consistently packed houses around the world and decimated stages everywhere from Rock on the Range and Woodstock to OZZfest and Shiprocked! 2015’s Kill The Flaw represented a high watermark. Bowing at #13 on the Billboard Top 200, it scored their highest debut on the respective chart since 2010 and marked their fifth consecutive Top 10 on the Top Rock Albums Chart and third straight Top 3 on the Hard Rock Albums Chart. Most impressively, the lead single “Thank You” garnered a nomination in the category of “Best Metal Performance” at the 2016 GRAMMY® Awards, a career first. All I See Is War continued the band’s success debuting at #28 on the Billboard 200 and has become a favorite among critics and fans alike thanks to singles like “Dirty,” “Medicated” and “Risen.” 

Lucky Number Slevin – Review

Once upon a time, there lived a simple guy named Slevin (Josh Hartnett). At some point, the white streak of his life changed to black, and Slevin began such troubles that he even took a shovel and started digging in. It all started with the fact that he lost his job. Then they decided to demolish his house because of some new variety of termites. Well, it all ended up that Slevin found his girlfriend in a pose in which the phrase: “This is not what you think” – it seems extremely stupid. And then Slevin decided to fly to New York to his friend Nick Fisher, who said that he had found a job for him.

However, the Big Apple also did not meet Slevin with a white stripe. At first, when he left the airport, he was attacked by some drug addict, broke his nose and took his wallet. Then, when Slevin came to Nick’s apartment, in which Nick himself wasn’t there, he was seized by some rude guys, not even having to put on his pants after a shower, and brought to a cool authority named Boss (Morgan Freeman). The Boss took Slevin for Nick, who, as it turned out, owed the Boss 96 thousand dollars. And even though the Boss is kindly ready to round up the amount to 90 thousand, to Slevin, this figure seems unbearable. However, the Boss, still kindly, offers Slevin to forgive the debt. But on one condition: Slevin must kill the son of the old foe Boss – also a criminal authority named Rabbi (Ben Kingsley). Recently, the Boss’s son was killed, and he longs for revenge.

But the situation didn’t end there either since further rude Jews appeared behind Slevin, who brought him to the Rabbi. It turned out that Nick and the Rabbi owed money and a lot. And now Slevin, who can find himself at the wrong time in the wrong place, needs to get out somehow. The situation is complicated by the fact that a professional killer named Goodkat (Bruce Willis) revolves around Boss and the Rabbi, who also has some complaints about Slevin.

Actually, the movie features fixed horse racing, and throughout the movie, you will understand why that matters. It plays a pivotal role. It was very interesting for the director to choose horse racing because it is one of the first sports where people placed bets. One of the Canadian actors in the movie, Peter Outerbridge, portraying Detective Dumbrowski who alongside Detective Brikowski is involved in the investigation, became so interested in betting after the plot of the movie that he supposedly started searching casino bonuses in Canada to improve his earnings. Both detectives in the movie are very important, yet Detective Brikowski more, but that does not change the pace of the movie.

If I were told that Guy Ritchie made this film, I would quite believe it. Many of the moments in the film are very similar to Ritchie’s style, and the well-chosen music that accompanies the appearance of either black or Jewish fighters is a direct borrowing from Snatch. However, Ritchie was carried away by the sea together with a completely slurred revolver, so the Lucky Number of Slevin did not belong to him at all, but Paul McGuigan made this film, whose previous works were in a slightly different style.

Ritchie’s imitations in this film are not at all annoying. Because it is all done competently and efficiently. After all, what difference does it make who shot it? If only the movie looked good. But it looks, in general, quite good.

Lucky Number Slevin is a crime detective with a slight bias in a black-comedy comedy, the plot of which is twisted pretty dashingly. All the events in the film have their clear background, and the audience will be able to compose the full picture of what is happening only at the end of the film (except for, of course, those who managed to guess everything even before the explanation).

One could expect that Bruce Willis would bring the ironic component in this film – a master of criminal irony. However, this did not happen. Here, Willis plays a murderously serious killer (a pun came out quite by accident), and his role is quite episodic. However, it played well, although gloomy for a similar genre. But purely scenic much in this character has remained unsaid. For example, it is completely unknown why he was suddenly called Goodkat, but we did not receive an answer.

Of all the acting, the most pleasant impression was made by two authorities – Boss and the Rabbi performed by Morgan Freeman and Sir Ben Kingsley. This is power, and these are characters! The Rabbi there generally gives out magnificent phrases with an incredibly impressive appearance. It is a pity that their roles are not at all the main ones.

Lucy Liu in the film played the role of the neighbour Nick, who starts up tricks with Slevin. She played well. The scene was especially tender and romantic when Slevin lost a towel in the eyes of a neighbour, and such a gamut of feelings was reflected in these eyes.

In general, in my opinion, it is quite a decent movie. I watched it with pleasure, considering the presence in the film of Josh Hartnett, and even in the title role. Since Guy Ritchie does not want to please the audience with such films, let it be Paul McGuigan. In the end, it doesn’t matter to us who directs this. The result is important.

A look back at some of the lucky punters who won £250,000 playing Deal or No Deal

There are 3,003 episodes of the classic Channel 4 gameshow Deal or No Deal – hosted by Noel Edmonds. The production, which was based on the original Netherlands format of the game called Miljoenenjacht, first aired back in 2005 before ending in December 2016.

In this 11-year period, just nine lucky punters won the top prize of £250,000. But, if you weren’t lucky enough to enter the ‘Dream Factory,’ then not to worry as you can still attempt to beat the Banker by playing Deal or No Deal online with Paddy Power – with some games boasting top prizes in excess of £1 million. If you still need some inspiration to get playing, then let’s take a look back at a number of the quarter-of-a-million quid winners. .

Laura Pearce – 2007
The show was on our screens for almost two years before we saw the first lucky winner of ‘the biggie.’ Laura Pearce was the first contestant to win the whopping sum of money, having declined a final offer £45,000 from the Banker – leaving her with either a mere £3,000 or the £250,000. Pearce’s box – the number six – was her father’s birthday and she refused the temptation of the swap. It turned out to be the right choice from Pearce as she scooped the life-changing amount of money.

Alice Munday – 2009
Alice Munday’s game will, undoubtedly, go down as one of the best games in the history of Deal or No Deal. Munday accepted an offer of £17.5k early on in the show. However, as she was left with 1p and the lucrative £250,000 on the board the Banker offered her another opportunity to gamble. Munday took her chances and refused to swap her box – the number six – which then saw her take home the biggest prize of all.

Suzanne Mulholland – 2011
Keeping up with the trend of winning the quarter-of-a-million prize every two years, Suzanne Mulholland became the third winner of the top prize in 2011. The County Cork-native’s game was one of the most heart-racing games in the shows 11-year stint. Mulholland turned down mouth-watering sums of money from the Banker – including £30,000 and £75,000 – on her quest to ‘the biggie.’ Although, when she was left with just the £100,000 and the £250,000 on the board, she turned down a huge £165,000! To add to the thrills, the Irishwomen then took the swap and landed the £250,000. Phew!

Paddy Roberts – 2013
Tegen Roberts and Nong Skett scooped the £250,000 prize in between Mulholland and Paddy Roberts. However, Roberts – who was only 18 years old at the time – became the first man to win ‘the biggie.’ The Wigan-native claimed that he would be happy with £18,000 and was tempted with offers of £17,000 and £19,999 from the Banker, although he was determined he had the £250,000 and played on. The sandwich shop assistant also turned down a whopping final offer of £140,000 before taking him the quarter-of-a-million.

Ann Crawford – 2015
Ann Crawford was the penultimate punter to win the £250,000. However, it wasn’t plain sailing for the pensioner as she almost blew it all. Early on in the show Crawford accidently wasted her use of the Offer Button as she pressed it when the Banker was due to call and make an offer. Although, this wasn’t the 75-year-old’s only blunder of the show. Crawford nearly bought the number 23 box, which could have seen her double her winnings and take home £500,000 – or absolutely nothing. She accidently said “deal no” instead of “no deal.” As gasps echoed around the Dream Factory, the Banker gave her the chance to change her decision. After saying “no deal” it was revealed that the 23 box would have sent her home with absolutely nothing.

“This has been one of the most amazing hours of my whole life.

“It’s an extraordinary game at the best and worst of times but then someone comes along and plays the game so much their own way that it literally takes your breath away. Congratulations Ann!” Edmonds said afterwards.

Film Review “My Lucky Star”

Starring: Ziyi Zhang, Leehom Wang
Directed by: Dennie Gordon
Not Rated
Running time: 1 hour 45 mins
China Lion Films

Our Score: 4 out of 5 stars

Sophie (Zhang) is a dreamer. While working her dull, unexciting job selling vacation packages over the phone she longs for the adventures she dreams up and home and puts on paper. Sophie likes to draw comics and submits them for publication. The latest one features a handsome, suave secret agent, whom she fantasizes about meeting one day. When she wins an all expense paid trip to Singapore that day comes sooner than expected.

Deftly directed by Dennie Gordon, who also used her skill to help make David Spade appealing in “Joe Dirt,” “My Lucky Star” is James Bond-lite – from the opening credits on- with a twist. Here the smart one is Sophie herself, with the occasional help provided by the object of Sophie’s attention and imagination: David (Wang). The story deals with a diamond (the “Lucky Star” of the title) Sophie thinks she won as part of her vacation package. The diamond is being kept in a case built to withstand an atomic blast. When Sophie tries to obtain the diamond she is made to luck the case so that she can only open it. She does this by kissing the case shut, which makes it bad luck for anyone interested in the contents of the mysterious case.

What is amazing about “My Lucky Star” is that it takes what is really a one note concept – artist begins to live her drawings – and turns it into a film that not only holds your imagination but helps to fuel it. Zhang, currently helping to kick box-office butt with the martial arts biography “The Grandmaster,” is perfect as Sophie. Curious as to what life has to offer, Zhang gives Sophie a true sense of naiveté that those around her recognize. Her life is a comic book and she does her best to fit in. In a way, Sophie is a lot like John Cusack’s character, Hoops McCann, in “Better Off Dead.” Zhang is also surrounded by some great on-screen talent, including the handsome Wang, who gives off an aura of coolness with just a glance.

Technically the film is solid. Director Gordon keeps the story flowing smoothly and the photography, by cinematographer Armando Salas, is picture perfect. From Beijing to Macau to Singapore, not an inch of screen time is wasted.

“My Lucky Star” is currently in limited release in the following cities: Boston, Chicago, Honolulu, Los Angeles, New York, San Francisco, Seattle, Toronto, Vancouver, and the Washington, D.C.