3 Best Educational Movies of the 21st Century

Photo by Pietro Jeng from Pexels

According to research, teenagers and kids spend an average of 4.5 to 6.5 hours in front of screens. Knowing the dangers associated with excessive screen time, parents try to get kids off screens into a more productive activity like study.

What many parents miss, however, is that they could harness the power of movies and channel it to studies realizing even more benefits than those attained from the less-screen time approach. By selecting an appropriate educational film for students, you get to educate them on class issues and get points to stick for even longer.

However, finding a suitable educational movie requires more effort than an online search and watching whatever pops up first. To help you find suitable films for study, here are scrutinized movies recommended by educators for different levels and addressing various subjects.  While at it, consider engaging professionals to get your paper written and score credits in multiple subjects.

America: the study of US

With a plethora of educational films in the historical niche, none excels in narrating the US history like this film. In this 12-series nine-hour documentary film, you are taken through the history of America from its inception to the point it became a superpower.

Unlike other films, this documentary-drama narrates the American history with precision and in an entertaining manner thus increasing the ability for students retaining the information. Among the areas tackled in these movies include the technological advancements in America and how the shaped growth and industry.

The industrial developments, economic progression and the engagements of America in the world wars and the cold war. In the early episodes, the movie shows how America rid itself of the shackles of the British crown rule to gain the independence to govern themselves freely.

Although it covers dark parts of American history, this film does not include gory images and as such can be used for middle school kids.

The Story of all of us Mankind

Apart from being shrouded with many theories and ideologies, the history of humankind can prove a mind-nabbing lesson for students. To ease the concepts for students, this documentary lays down an account of evolution and describes the emergence of governance, metropolis, and superpowers.

As opposed to other educational films on the evolution of man, this film does not incline to any particular evolution theory instead marries various elements to create a flow of ideas and try to figure: what happened.

Apart from evolution, this documentary also shows the socio-political growth and rivalry that shaped the path to development until the current time. Also, this movie covers the challenges that informed the development of tools and other transitioning that early man had to accommodate to survive. Like the former, this is a twelve-hour series that should be studied in bits depending on the topic you aim to address.

American Promise

Unlike the latter and the former that is based on the historical occurrences, American promise is a documentary based on the current society and addressing the societal evils being faced currently.

Set in the school background, this movie shows the gap in the value of education between, African-Americans and white kids. Despite the talent levels of Idris and Seun, the families face a fair share of challenges getting them through the system due to the racism and other circumstances.

As you engage the movies and learn issues that you may have skipped in class, it is wise to hire experts on my paper done.com thus getting quality work for an affordable price.

 

Related Content

HARRY AND THE POTTERS ANNOUNCE THEIR FIRST NEW ALBUM IN 13 YEARS: LUMOS – OUT JUNE 21st

The pioneers of wizard rock return with a double LP chronicling the all-too-relevant events of the seventh Harry Potter book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows

“The Potters specialize in lo-fi indie rock, sung from the perspective of the protagonist, played by both [Paul] DeGeorge and his brother Joe. Musically, they take cues from the nerdy meanderings of They Might Be Giants and Magnetic Fields, adding on silly lyrics sourced from the books’ plot lines.”-Rolling Stone ” …a gimmick, a daydream, and a beautiful geeky power-fantasy all wrapped in one… they wrote music about what they adored, they had no fear, and along the way they fostered a beautiful thing.” VICE’s Noisey 

On June 21st, wizard rock pioneers Harry and the Potters (Paul and Joe DeGeorge), will release their first full-length album since 2006: LumosUsing the magic of rock and roll, it chronicles the events of the seventh and final Harry Potter book where J.K. Rowling’s teen wizard and his friends are on the run from a xenophobic, authoritarian regime and must work diligently to take down a dark wizard who capitalizes on fear and emboldens supremacist wizards. In other words, the subject matter of Lumos is extremely relevant. Harry and the Potters will embark on their first national tour of libraries since 2011 in support of the new album

Lumos was first announced to Harry and the Potters’ fans with a Kickstarter campaign on April 23rd, doubling its funding goal within 24 hours of launch.  

Lumos is an album for this political moment. For the parents raising a younger generation reading these books for the first time, it’s an opportunity to connect the dots: the systems facilitating oppression in the wizard world – state-run media, children being separated from their mixed-blood parents, surveillance systems, and pureblood supremacy – strongly echo the daily reality of creeping neo-fascism. For the generation of Harry Potter fans that has grown up into a world where cartoonish villains occupy the halls of power, it’s a reminder that there is a pathway forward. Now is the time for Dumbledore’s Army, for the Order of the Phoenix. We are being called upon to become the heroes that this moment necessitates.

Paul DeGeorge tells Rolling Stone, “we’re hoping that parents and their young kids might see us play at the library, hear a song explicitly critiquing pureblood supremacy and then later have a real discussion about white supremacy and how it manifests in their own lives.”

These are wizard fight songs, but there are also songs about riding dragons, magic pictures of cats, and using cool spells while camping. There is even a platonic friendship power ballad duet with Kimya Dawson, who makes a special guest appearance as Hermione Granger. Truly there is something here for the whole family – especially if the whole family is invested in defeating Voldemort.

Tracklist:

1. Lumos

2. You’re Not the Wizard

3. Good Riddance (Privet Drive)

4. The Trace

5. On the Importance of Media Literacy Under Authoritarian Rule

6. Hermione’s Army

7. What Happened to the Cat?

8. The Banality of Evil (Song for Albert Runcorn)

9. Gone Campin’

10. Where’s Ron? (featuring Kimya Dawson as Hermione Granger)

11. No Pureblood Supremacy

12. Voldemort in Your Head

13. The Sword, The Cup, and the Dragon

14. The Cloak

15. The Stone

16. The Wand

Tour dates (More to be announced): 

June 21 – Gloucester, MA – Sawyer Free Library 
June 22 – Buffalo, NY – Buffalo and Erie County Public Library
June 23 – London, ON – The Rec Room
June 24 – Toronto, ON – The Rec Room
June 26 – Ann Arbor, MI – Ann Arbor District Downtown Library
June 28 – Athens, OH – Athens Public Library
June 29 – Louisville, KY – Louisville Free Public Library
June 30 – Chicago, IL – Beat Kitchen
July 1 – DeForest, WI – DeForest Area Public Library
July 2 – Dubuque, IA – Eagle Point Park (rain location: Carnegie-Stout Public Library)
July 3 – Minneapolis, MN – Cedar Cultural Center
July 4 – Rapid City, SD – Memorial Park Bandshell
July 5 – Steamboat Springs, CO – Strings Music Festival
July 6 – Boulder, CO – Band Shell in Central Park
July 7 – Denver, CO – Mercury Cafe
July 8 – Provo, UT – Provo Library at Academy Square
July 9 – Salt Lake City, UT – Kilby Court
July 12 – Missoula, MT – Missoula Public Library
July 13 – Calgary, AB – The Rec Room
July 14 – Edmonton, AB – The Rec Room
July 16 – Vancouver, BC – Vancouver Public Library
July 17 – Anacortes, WA – Causland Park
July 18 – Olympia, WA – Olympia Timberland Library
July 19 – Seattle, WA – Seattle Public Library
July 20 – Portland, OR – St. Johns Library
July 20 – Portland, OR – Gresham Library
July 21 – Eugene, OR – Downtown Eugene Public Library
July 23 – Santa Clara, CA – Northside Branch Library
July 24 – San Francisco, CA – Bottom of the Hill
July 25 – Oakland, CA – Oakland Public Library Main Branch
July 27 – Santa Barbara, CA – Santa Barbara Public Library
July 30 – Los Angeles, CA – Troubadour
July 31 – Huntington Beach, CA – Huntington Beach Public Library
August 1 – Las Vegas, NV – Clark County Library 
August 2 – Phoenix, AZ – Burton Barr Central Library
August 3 – Tucson, AZ – Flowing Wells Branch Library
August 4 – El Paso, TX – El Paso Public Library
August 5 – San Antonio, TX – The Magik Theater
August 6 – Houston, TX – Houston Public Library – Barbara Bush Literacy Plaza
August 7 – New Orleans, LA – New Orleans Public Library – Main Library
August 8 – Ridgeland, MS – Ridgeland Public Library
August 9 – Dallas, TX – LeakyCon
August 11 – Dallas, TX – Renner Frankford Branch Library
August 12 – Austin, TX – Mohawk
August 14 – Shawnee, KS – Monticello Library
August 15 – Tulsa, OK – Tulsa City County Library – Hardesty Regional Library
August 16 – Springfield, MO – The Library Center
August 18 – Greensboro, NC – Greensboro Public Library
August 20 – Washington, DC – Woodridge Library
August 21 – Lewes, DE – Lewes Public Library
August 22 – Brooklyn, NY – Knitting Factory
August 24 – Boston, MA – Boston Public Library (Dartmouth Street Steps)

Harry and the Potters are the first wizard rock band. They play songs exclusively about the Harry Potter books. The band consists of brothers Joe and Paul DeGeorge. They grew up in a suburban Boston house that has a cupboard under the stairs. Since 2002, Harry and the Potters have performed over 800 shows in libraries, rock clubs, art spaces, bookstores, basements, and all ages venues all over the world. Their high-energy live show has become legendary. Pitchfork placed the band in their Best Live Shows of 2005 list noting, “the greatest rock and roll tour of the year took place this past summer in public libraries across America… The Decemberists wish they could lit-rock like this.”

Inspired by equal parts Fugazi and They Might Be Giants, Bruce Springsteen and Negativland, the band continues to occupy a bizarre niche that brings their DIY punk ethos to the fandom of a mainstream cultural phenomena. Their commitment to playing all ages shows has meant extensive touring in unconventional spaces like libraries (where a large number of teens and pre-teens undoubtedly saw their first concert ever). As fandom and convention culture has gone mainstream  – and in the process become increasingly corporatized – over the past decade, it feels refreshing to see a free Harry and the Potters show at the local library.

The band helped co-found the pioneering fan activist organization The Harry Potter Alliance and were profiled in the 2008 documentary We Are Wizards. With their annual Yule Balls (2005-present) and the Wizard Rock EP Club (which released albums from over 30 different wizard rock bands between 2007-2009), the band has raised over $100,000 for the Harry Potter Alliance and other literature-related charities.

In 2019, they will release Lumos, their first full-length album in over a decade, and will embark on an extensive summer tour of libraries across the United States.

For more info visit: www.harryandthepotters.com