Top 5 Effective Time Management Tips for New College Students

Time management is an essential skill whether you’re in college or not. The way you manage your time determines if you’ll be successful or not. To get a head start each day, make sure you wake up early. This way, by the time it’s noon, you’re done with a larger percentage of your day’s tasks.

As a college student, you understand how rigorous your course is. If you don’t manage your time well, you’re likely to fall into depression from all the pressure coming your way. The world does not pause to wait for you if you decide to wake up at 9 a.m. when everyone else is up by 5 a.m. If you’re not a morning person, figure out a way to make your routine work for you.

Surround yourself with hard-working friends, this way you’ll always be on your toes even on days when you’re not motivated to do anything. For example you can do college papers online so it allows you to switch to another task faster. Spending time with lazy students brings out the worst in you.

You need to begin by figuring out how early you can wake up. From there, make sure every minute of each day counts. Have a to-do list for each day, so you don’t go into a day with no idea what you want to do.

Here are five effective ways to make sure of the most valuable resource you have.

1.     Wake up On Time

So what do we mean by waking up on time? Well, the thing is, what works for one person might not necessarily work for you. You cannot expect to wake up at 5 a.m. when you only had two hours to sleep.

This means coming up with a sleeping cycle that works for you. We hear so many times that we should strive to be morning people but the truth is this is not the only way to succeed. If you thrive at being a night owl, make sure you have a consistent sleeping cycle.

That said, this does not mean you should sleep till 2 p.m. and expect to have a productive day. You have to be realistic with your sleeping cycle; otherwise, you’ll end up oversleeping. As you know, nothing waste’s a person’s time like oversleeping because usually, you wake up too exhausted to be functional.

2.     Get Enough Sleep

Sleeping is very important because your body cannot function properly without rest. Make sure you get at least seven hours of sleep each day. When you’re sleeping, your brain uses this time to process the information you encountered during the day. No wonder you hear people say, ‘I’ll sleep on it’ when they can’t seem to solve a problem.

Sleep is essential, and without it, you can hardly manage your time properly. Imagine dozing off in every lecture because you have a tendency of pulling all-nighters. You’ll get out of each lecture having understood nothing which means you’ll need more time to go through your notes.

3.     Have a Timeline for Everything

You don’t have all the time in the world because the clock is always clicking. For you to properly manage the time you have, you have to set timelines for everything. If a professor leaves an assignment that is due in two weeks, try to complete it before then because chances are, that is not the only assignment you’ll need to work on.

4.     Have a day to day To-do List

A to-do list of what you need to stay productive during the day. You will manage your time better when you wake up each morning with a sense of purpose. Before you go to bed, write down a to-do list for the next day.

5.     Cut yourself some Slack

You are not a robot, which means your system requires breaks now and then. Do not push yourself too hard or you might crash. Cut yourself some slack and reward yourself for major milestones.

Conclusion

These tips ensure that you manage your time well while in college. Ensure you surround yourself with friends who value their time like you do.

Universal’s Peter Schade talks about restoring “JAWS” for Blu-ray

“Jaws” fans can now breathe a sigh of relief because after years of begging and pleading Universal Studios is about to release Steven Spielberg’s 1975 blockbuster in an all new Blu-ray DVD package. But how do you take a film almost four decades old and make it look like better then brand new? That job fell to Peter Schade, Vice President of Content Management and Technical Services for Universal.

After earning a bachelor’s degree in Telecommunication and Film from California State University, Schade began his career as a scheduler for Turner Entertainment in 1989. He later worked in the technical services departments of both Turner and Worldvision. In 1999 he joined Universal as Director of Worldwide Home Video and Television Servicing, playing a key role in the relocation of International Home Video Servicing. He was promoted to his current position in August 2002. While finalizing his work on “Jaws” Mr. Schade found the time to sit down with Media Mikes.

Mike Smith: You have a Bachelor’s Degree in Telecommunication and Film. What were your goals when you left college? Did you intend on working in the technical side as you are now or were you looking to be more hands on as a filmmaker?
Peter Schade: When I was in school I always gravitated more towards being an editor. On student projects I was always the guy putting them together. But when I got my first “real” job after school I did intend to grativate more towards the technical side but circumstances pulled me more towards a management role. But I am managing a technical department so I’m very happy where I am.

MS: Can you describe a normal work day?
PS: Wow. My job has many facets so there are really no two days that are alike. My department sits right between production and distribution, so upstream of me you’ve got production both in the feature and television side creating content and delivering it to the studio. Then my team creates all of the archived assets that are made in support of distribution and then downstream of me are divisions like Home Video and Television…International…Domestic…Non-theatrical. So we’re delivering content every day to any number of those groups. The rest of the library has us dealing with contents that are decades old to contents that are brand new so there are lots of challenges. There’s never a dull moment!

MS: Were there any special processes that you needed to employ to transfer “Jaws?”
PS: The special processes begin in the way we care for the elements, from the original negative on down through any of the distribution masters that we make. We have our own vaults – buildings that are specifically designed to store material – that are kept at the proper temperature and humidity. In terms of taking the original negative and transferring it…digitizing it…we specifically used a film scanner that employed wet gate technology. This means the film is passed through a chamber before the gate which is filled with a liquid that is the same as the film base. Therefore any surface damage on the film is filled in and we don’t see the things that have gotten on the film as a result of its age. It’s scanned at 6K resolution, which is probably eight to ten times more then you’d see on High Def. Once that image information is digitized off the filmwe use any number of tools to work on color correction and dirt fixes and stabilization. There are manyparallel processes that go on at the same time that take weeks and sometimes months until we have a product that we think is of the quality needed to put out on Blu-ray.

MS: In the featurette describing the processes currently on line, it looks like you’re actually inspecting , cleaning and digitalizing the film frame by frame. Is that correct?
PS: There is an inspection that goes on. Before you put the film on a mechanical device you want to make sure there’s no broken sprocket holes or loose splices. You have to make sure the film is in good shape before you even begin to scan it. That is what they are referring to in the documentary as far as studying the film frame by frame. It’s literally a negative expert who is used to handling film. They go through every reel and hand inspect every foot…every frame…of that film.

MS: Do you also spend any extra time working on the supplemental aspects of the disc? I know the fan documentary “The Shark is Still Working” is included. Did your team work on that film as well?
PS: My team only focuses on the actual feature itself. There are other groups that focus on the supplemental material.

MS: I think I can speak, not only for “Jaws” fans, but for film fans when I say that the release of “Jaws” on Blu-ray is probably one of the most anticipated releases in the history of the format.
PS: It’s a great film. It’s one of my favorites as well. It stands the test of time. And coming out on Blu-ray, we’re very proud and honored to get it out there and have fans see it better than it’s ever been

 

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