Enter to Win Tickets to See Brit Floyd Live in Orlando, FL During Their Immersion World Tour

The hotly anticipated rock event of the year returns, as Brit Floyd brings the music of Pink Floyd to life once again with its lavish new stage show, ‘Pink Floyd Immersion World Tour 2017’. The spectacle of a Pink Floyd concert experience is truly recaptured in high-definition sound, and with a stunning million dollar light show and state of the art video design.

Media Mikes is teaming up with Brit Floyd to give TWO fans a chance to attend the band’s upcoming stop in Orlando, FL at the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts on November 19th. If you are interested in winning this pair of tickets, let us know in a comment below or via our contact us page with your favorite Pink Floyd song. Winners will be chosen at random on November 1st, 2017. One entry per person per household. Good luck!

Brit Floyd kicks off the Immersion World Tour for 2017 for the North America Winter leg

The hotly anticipated rock event of the year returns, as Brit Floyd brings the music of Pink Floyd to life once again with its lavish new stage show, ‘Pink Floyd Immersion World Tour 2017’. The spectacle of a Pink Floyd concert experience is truly recaptured in high-definition sound, and with a stunning million dollar light show and state of the art video design.

As well as performing the favorite moments from The Dark Side of the Moon, Wish You Were Here, The Wall and The Division Bell, Brit Floyd will also pay special tribute to the Animals album, in its 40th anniversary year, with a show stopping rendition of ‘Dogs’, as well as a host of other Pink Floyd musical gems. The Brit Floyd show has truly become a phenomenon, widely regarded as the world’s greatest live tribute to Pink Floyd. Faithfully recreating the scale and pomp of the final 1994 Division Bell tour, complete with circle screen and multiple moving light design, lasers, inflatables and theatrics, a Brit Floyd show really is as close as fans will ever get to experiencing the magnificence of a Pink Floyd show live.   More than a tribute, it’s as good as they say. Believe the hype and don’t miss it!  The new ‘Pink Floyd Immersion’ show promises to be Brit Floyd’s most ambitious and best production yet.

Tour dates:
Wed 1 Nov Johnstown PA Cambria War Memorial Arena
Thu 2 Nov Shippensburg PA Luhrs Performing Arts Center
Fri 3 Nov Atlantic City NJ The Event Center at Borgata
Sat 4 Nov Hamilton ON First Ontario Concert Hall
Mon 6 Nov London ON RBC Theatre at Budweiser Gardens
Tue 7 Nov Wilkes-Barre PA Kirby Center
Wed 8 Nov Providence RI VETS
Fri 10 Nov New Brunswick NJ State Theatre
Sat 11 Nov Manchester NH Verizon Arena
Sun 12 Nov Huntington NY Paramount Theatre
Mon 13 Nov Lynn MA Memorial Auditorium
Tue 14 Nov Reading PA Santander Performing Arts Center
Thu 16 Nov Charlotte NC Ovens Auditorium
Sat 18 Nov Augusta GA The Bell Auditorium
Sun 19 Nov Orlando FL Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Mon 20 Nov Tallahassee The Pavilion at The Centre of Tallahassee
Tue 21 Nov Knoxville TN Tennessee Theatre
Fri 24 Nov Tulsa OK Brady Theatre
Sat 25 Nov Pueblo CO Memorial Hall
Sun 26 Nov Casper WY Events Center
Tue 28 Nov Regina Conexus Arts Centre
Wed 29 Nov Calgary AB Jack Singer Concert Hall
Thu 30 Nov Edmonton AB Winspear Centre
Sat 2 Dec Kamloops BC Sandman Centre
Sun 3 Dec Prince George BC CN Centre
Tue 5 Dec Vancouver BC Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Wed 6 Dec Bellingham WA Mount Baker Theatre
Thu 7 Dec Spokane WA Fox Theatre
Sat 9 Dec Yakima WA The Capitol Theatre
Sun 10 Dec Boise ID Morrison Center
Mon 11 Dec Eugene OR Hult Center

Durga McBroom-Hudson talks about working with Pink Floyd on “The Endless River”

Singer/songwriter Durga McBroom-Hudson has worked with the band Pink Floyd as a backing vocalist consistently on almost all of their shows since the 1987 “A Momentary Lapse of Reason” Tour up to the final concert of “The Division Bell” in 1994. In 1989, she formed the band Blue Pearl and had several hit songs including “Naked in the Rain”. Recently, she came back together with Pink Floyd to record on their supposed last album “The Endless River”. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Durga about her work with the band and her plans for the future.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us how you ended up perform backing vocals for Pink Floyd?
Durga McBroom-Hudson: My sister was recording an album on Capitol Records in New York with Nile Rogers, and I was doing backing vocals for her. Meanwhile, Pink Floyd had started the Momentary Lapse Of Reason Tour with only 2 singers. The man who ran the production company shooting the initial concert videos recommended my sister, and she recommended me. They needed someone to sing bottom, so they asked me to join the tour.

MG: You toured with the band for their album “A Momentary Lapse of Reason” and “The Division Bell” tours; what was your most memorable experience?
DMH: Probably Pink Floyd Live In Venice.

MG: After your first tour with the band for “A Momentary Lapse of Reason”, what was it actually getting to go in and record in the studio for “The Division Bell”?
DMH: It was wonderful. Bob Ezrin had wanted all English singers, so they recorded the whole thing that way. But David thought the low parts weren’t right, so they flew me over from Los Angeles and I re-recorded all of those parts. He really likes the tone of my voice. It’s a huge honor to know one of your biggest teachers appreciates you.

MG: What is your favorite Pink Floyd to sing and why?
DMH: I don’t have only one. That is like asking which of your children is your favorite. Most people would assume “Great Gig In The Sky”, but I have a love/hate relationship with singing it because it’s so difficult.

MG: What is a fun fact about David Gilmour that a lot of people might not know?
DMH: I personally believe he’s a bit shy, despite the fact that he has quite an imposing presence. I am very fond of him.

MG: How did you get approached to come back for Pink Floyd’s last album “The Endless River”?
DMH: Youth, who is my partner in my own band Blue Pearl is a co-producer on “The Endless River”. He asked me, and we surprised David with what I came up with. Luckily, David loved it.

MG: Did you work exclusively on “Louder than Words”?
DMH: No. I am also singing on “Talkin’ Hawkin'” and “Surfacing”. David asked me to come in to add to what I had already done on “Louder Than Words”.

MG: What was it like working with David Gilmour again after a 20 year break?
DMH: He is the best, and he makes me do my best. I love working with him. It was like coming home.

MG: Was it challenging coming back to work on the music that Richard Wright created without him there?
DMH: He was there. I could feel him.

MG: Tell us about your involvement with the animated film “Strange Frame”?
DMH: I sang on the soundtrack, including a cover of “The Gunner’s Dream” from “The Final Cut” with Roger Water’s approval.

MG: What else do you have planned for the rest of the year and next year?
DMH: I expect to get more mixes in from Youth from the new Blue Pearl album, and next year I expect to see it released, as well as doing A LOT of shows. The rest of this year will mostly be spent with family. The new Culture Club album will be released in January, and hopefully George will have recovered enough from his throat injury to go back on tour – I hope to do some shows with them too. I already have at least 15 dates lined up from Brazil to Finland, some with my sister Lorelei. Keep your eyes open – chances are I’ll be in a city near you!

Disney Legend, Floyd Norman talks about his work on “The Jungle Book”

Animator, Floyd Norman was named a Disney Legend in 2007. His first feature for Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”. He worked under Walt’s personal supervision on story sequences for “The Jungle Book”. In 1997, Norman moved to Pixar Animation Studios where he joined the story crew for “Toy Story 2” and “Monsters, Inc.”. He continues to work for The Walt Disney Co. as a freelance consultant on various projects. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Floyd about “The Jungle Book” and working personally with Walt Disney.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us what it is like to see a film like “The Jungle Book” restored and presented on high definition Blu-ray?
Floyd Norman: It is delightful to know that people still appreciate this film. It continues to amaze us that worked on it nearly 50 years ago that it is still loved by audiences. It seems to have a life of its own and I love that.

MG: Have you seen it yet and if so how do you feel it looks having worked on it?
FN: I do not really see that much of a difference. I know that the film looks clean and pristine. The guys who did the restoration have done a terrific job, so no complaints there.

MG: You worked under Walt Disney’s personal supervision on story sequences including the song “Trust in Me”, tell us about that process?
FN: It was very simple [laughs]. In a way it was simple, yet also very complex. When I began working on this particular sequence, I was handed some rough notes from Larry Clemmons, who was credited on the film for the story. I called him our writer because he has an actual typewriter and that made him a real writer [laughs]. So he wrote me notes about the sequence and for this one it was going to be Mowgli’s meeting with Kaa the Snake. So that is pretty much all I got. We were told that Kaa was going to try and hypnotize him and then funny stuff would happen. So that is what I had to go with “funny stuff was going to happen”. I had to come up with that “funny stuff”. So like I said in one sense it was a very simple job as well as being very complex because we had to figure out what was that funny stuff and how was it going to happen. They just kind of turned you loose and let you do your job.

MG: How long did a scene like that take to complete?
FN: It is difficult to remember. I would say a few weeks, maybe three weeks to completely storyboard that sequence. That was considered normal during that time. I had no real rush because Walt Disney was either in Europe or working on other matters and wasn’t able to review it right away. So I definitely had amble time to work on it.

MG: Did you find that working directly with Walt Disney did you have any creative freedom or did you follow a set path?
FN: Oh no, I found that I had a good deal of creative freedom. Surprisingly more than I ever realized. I initially came in expecting to be told exactly want to do and that was not the case at all. I came in and they said “Here is the sequence and just go do it” [laughs]. So given very little guidance or direction, I just went off and did what I had to do. The good news was that whatever I did, they seemed to like it [laughs]. The main thing, and the most critical, was that Walt liked it. So as long as Walt likes it you are safe [laughs].

MG: Can you compare your work on “The Jungle Book” to some of your other earlier films including “Sleeping Beauty”, “The Sword in the Stone” and “Robin Hood”?
FN: It was actually totally different because on those films, I was actually working on the animation. For “Robin Hood”, I was an animator and didn’t do any storyboard work at all. It was just animation. Having said that, I feel that the story in “Robin Hood” was pretty terrible [laughs]. I can afford to say that because I didn’t story work on “Robin Hood” [laughs]. But I did have a lot to fun animating it. I worked on animation also with “The Sword in the Stone”. The cool thing about that project was that I got to work personally with Milt Kahl, who was acknowledged as being one of the finest Disney animators of all-time. Milt is a giant in the world of animation, so that was a big deal for me. I was still a kid when I worked with Milt; I was only in my 20’s. Milt was a tough guy but it was such a great experience.

MG: Unlike some animators you embraced the digital age by working at Pixar and definitely software for animation; tell how you feel animation has changed?
FN: Oh, there is no doubt that animation has changed. Once again, following in Walt’s philosophy, “You have to embrace change, not run from it”. When I saw what Pixar was doing, I thought that I had to work for these guys. So when the opportunity came for me to go to Pixar in 1997, I was ready to pack up and go. Not everybody was, mind you, Pixar was at that time not a well-known studio. They only had made one film, which was “Toy Story”. I think that you have to move forward as Walt believed “Don’t fight technology. Embrace it and learn how to use it”. That is what Pixar did and they are continuing to do that. Certainly that would have been what Walt would have done as well.

MG: Do you still do any animation for Disney today?
FN: No animation. But I have worked on Disney storybooks from time to time. As I have time I work on Disney projects. Generally, I wait for them to call me. I don’t go looking but every now and then someone will call me. I had the opportunity to work on an electronic device that they were developing. I asked one of the Vice President’s how did they get my name and they said “John Lasseter recommended you”. I do not think that you can do any better than that getting a recommendation from John Lasseter [laughs].

Blu-ray Review “Pink Floyd: Classic Albums – The Making of The Dark Side of the Moon”

Actors: Pink Floyd
Rated: NR (Not Rated)
Studio: Eagle Rock Entertainment
Release Date: August 27, 2013
Run Time: 92 minutes

Film: 4 out of 5 stars
Blu-ray: 2.5 out of 5 stars
Extras: 3.5 out of 5 stars

Ever since I was a kid, I have been a huge fan of Pink Floyd, starting with “Dark Side of the Moon” (thanks Dad). After listening to this album over and over and over, I never got tired of it and still never have. “Dark Side” is one of those records that just gets better every time, I can’t explain it but if you are a Floyd fan that you will know what I am talking about. “Classic Albums – The Making Of Dark Side Of The Moon” was originally released in 2003 and covers the making of this amazing album. It features great interview with with band members including Roger Waters, Richard Wright, David Gilmour, and Nick Mason. But more than that there are also great and very insightful interviews with engineer Alan Parsons, the late designer Storm Thorgerson, and tons of others. After 40 years, “Dark Side” is still one of the best selling albums in history and will continue to shine on.

Eagle Rock Entertainment is behind this Blu-ray release to be honest it just feel a little lazy. This is the first in there new SD (Standard Definition) Blu-ray releases. So basically this is just an upscaled versions of the original DVD. So it is cool to have it on Blu-ray but it is not really worth the upgrade if you already own the DVD’s. Along with “The Making of The Dark Side of the Moon”, they are also giving this treatment to the following Blu-ray “Bee Gees: One Night Only”, “Scorpions: Moment of Glory”, “The Rolling Stones: Stones in Exile”, so be wary of these as well. In terms of audio, the uncompressed LPCM 2.0 track works but I would have love to see this given a DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1.

Since this was originally shot for television, it runs 50 minutes. But there is an additional 40 minutes of bonus Features included on this Blu-ray. There are extra portions on “Brain Damage”, which features a complete solo acoustic performance by Roger Waters, which is amazing. “Money” features Roger Waters and Alan Parsons discuss the song and weaved in-between is David Gilmour playing guitar and Roger Waters playing bass. “Us And Them” features the late Richard Wright talking about the song and playing solo piano. “Breathe” features a complete solo acoustic performance by David Gilmour. “Time” features Waters discusses the track and showing demo footage. Lastly “Gilmour’s Guitars” focuses on track tracks including “Breathe”, “The Great Gig In The Sky” and “Us And Them”.

The Machine's Tahrah Cohen talks about touring and performing Pink Floyd

Tahrah Cohen is co-founder and drummer for the Pink Floyd cover band, The Machine. The band is celebrating 25 years of performing and spreading the music of Pink Floyd. Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Tahrah about the music and what she loves most.

Mike Gencarelli: You and Joe Pascarell founded The Machine back in 1988. What has been the highlight of the past 25 years?
Tahrah Cohen: We have just been having a great time touring all over the world. We have been to so many wonderful places and just love spreading the music to them.

MG: Given that you guys play the entire Pink Floyd back catalog – from well-known classics like “Comfortably Numb” to obscurities like “Careful With That Axe, Eugene”, is it difficult swing back and forth through the songs?
TC: Everyone in the band really knows how to do their part really well. Whether they are playing a David Gilmour part or singing a Roger Waters part it is not a problem. We are really experts for these situations at this point.

MG: Pink Floyd was known for their elaborate stage shows that, over time, evolved into massive-scale light shows and stage sets that were really ideal for large venues like outdoor stadiums. In terms of The Machine’s live performance, how important is the visual part of the

show? Do you feel that if your audience doesn’t get to see the circular-screen film projections, lasers bouncing all over the place and pigs flying that they’ll come away disappointed?
TC: It is very important. We use the visuals as accentuations of the show. Our focus has always been the music. We do not neglect the visuals. We have the video and lasers with an elaborate light show. Our shows do come with the visual aspect but our focus is the music.

MG: Are there any Floyd songs that The Machine will not play and, if so, why?
TC: Some of the earlier music, when Pink Floyd was developing their own sound is a little amateur. It doesn’t really stand the test of time like most of the material will. Just like any musician. We stay away from certain era’s of their development but still play from their first album to their last.

MG: What are your personal favorites? And what is the one song that everybody in the band collectively enjoys playing most?
TC: Personally, I love playing “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, the whole thing – all parts. I love it. We have probably played it 2500 times, easily. Every time it is on the set list, I am still excited to play it. The crowd always goes crazy for “Comfortably Numb” every time. We go crazy for anything on “Animals”. People that love Pink Floyd love it all.

MG: Over the course of the band’s career, how have the audiences that you play to changed?
TC: They have changed as we have changed. We’ve gotten older and they have gotten older. But their are also parts of our audience has have gotten younger, as well. There is a whole new generation of Pink Floyd fans under 20 years old and they are coming now to see us.

MG: What do you (and the other members) do when you’re not out there playing Floyd, both musically and non-musically?
TC: We all have other musical projects. We are all active with other bands and shows.

MG: Finally…which one’s Pink: Roger or David? 😉
TC: Ah…that is up to you to decide [laughs].

Colin Wilson reflects on 25 years with the band “The Australian Pink Floyd Show”

Colin Wilson is the bassist for the cover band, “The Australian Pink Floyd Show”.  2012 marks the 25th anniversary with the band, who perform over 100 shows a year all over the world. The band has recently released their  Blu-ray/DVD of their current “Exposed in the Light” and are planning a big tour for  2013 called “Eclipsed By The Moon” to celebrate the 40th anniversary of “Dark Side of the Moon”.  Media Mikes had a chance to chat with Colin about 25 years with the band and the bands work of constantly trying to improve their skill in order to master the work of Pink Floyd.

Mike Gencarelli: This year marks 20 years with “The Australian Pink Floyd Show”; how do you feel the band has evolved in that time?
Colin Wilson: Wow, well it has evolved incredibly. We started off very small, literally getting together on weekends and trying to learn songs. We are just trying to learn how to do Pink Floyd well. We did some small shows around Australia, like pubs and clubs. As the years have gone on, we have constantly re-invested into it. Every time we could we would get two extra lights or a bigger projector screen, things like that. We just kept putting back into the band. Now, as you said 20+ years later, we tour worldwide and doing over 100 shows a year. It is a really big full-scale production and it is the same sort of production now that you would expect to see with a mainstream band.

MG: After all these years, do you still have to put work into mastering the songs?
CW: Some aspects of it come easier just because of how much we are doing it. We don’t have any real long periods off. The longest we have away is two months over Christmas and you don’t forget everything in those two months. As far as playing the music goes, it is definitely getting a bit easier since all the hard work is done. But we never sort of rest on that. We are always trying to fine-tune and improve ourselves. We still listen to the music today and hear little subtleties that we might have missed.

MG: How does it feel to be called “The Best Tribute Band in the World”?
CW: It is funny for us. We are one of the first tribute bands. When we started up in Australia, in the end of the 80’s and early 90’s there were a lot of tribute bands forming mainly because a lot of the mainstream bands weren’t making it out there to tour. So there was definitely a need for people to do this since the fans wanted to hear it and the real band weren’t coming out. So we were one of the first and then definitely one of the first to take it overseas from Australia. When we got to the UK in the early 90’s, there were maybe 2 or 3 other tribute bands around but not many. I would say within the first 2 or 3 years of us being in the UK, the whole scene suddenly blew up and there were tribute bands everywhere. I guess we have stood the test of time since most of those early bands are long-gone. I guess that is due to the fact that we keep trying to improve ourselves every year and why we’re referred to as the best one around. It is incredibly gratifying to us when we get reviews like that and hear things like that.

MG: What is your biggest challenging having to cover two very different styles of Roger Waters and Guy Pratt?
CW: Song by song is not very challenging. The biggest challenge really is doing a song by one of them and then the very next song doing the other. You have to treat each one in a song by song basis and getting into the feel and groove of that song in the blink of an eye between the songs. And because I have been doing it for so long it just sort of happens for me. Hopefully it is working and I am able to do that effectively.

MG: What do you do to keep it fresh when performing these songs live each tour?
CW: Well, there are 10 musicians in the band and every one of them are complete professionals and each one of them approaches this in that way. We also all get on great as well. We are like a team. If one person doesn’t do their job, it sort of lets us all down. In some ways, we try and impress each other every night. It is a challenge but we are the kind of people that like that challenge. We try to do it right every night and send the audience away with big smiles on their faces. That is the mindset that we have and how we keep it fresh. Most importantly, we still enjoy doing it after all these years.

MG: What songs really hits home with you when performing live?
CW: Me personally, I love the songs from the “Animals” album. That’s probably my favorite with “Dark Side of the Moon” in a close second. On “Animals”, the tracks are very deep with a lot of aspects that you have to remember. They are quite long songs with many different passages. You have to be completely absorbed to play them and do them justice. So I really enjoy those. Also it has to be any of the songs that get an amazing reaction from the audience. Like every night we play “Another Brick in the Wall”, we get this fantastic buzz because the audience gets on their feet with that song.

MG: Tell us about your encounters with the actual members of Pink Floyd?
CW: Going way back to 1994/1995, David Gilmour came to see us play and met with us after the show. We got to talk with him for a while and he was really into what we were doing. We had played some songs that he himself haven’t heard, let alone played, in a long time. He was really encouraging and positive about that. He has seen us a few times since then when we come along to London. We sort of got his unofficial endorsement. We played at his 50th birthday party in London, which was incredible. It was amazing for us as a band and gave us that extra bit of credibility that maybe we needed with some of the more skeptical Floyd fans. Also Nick Mason, in the recent years, has said a lot of nice things about us in the press. We have a nice unofficial connection with them. We know that they are sort of watching us through the one eye kind of aspect. It is a nice relationship. We are not out having BBQ’s each weekend but we do have a nice distant relationship with them.

MG: Tell us about the newly released Blu-ray/DVD, “Exposed in the Light”?
CW: This is something that when we started out we weren’t sure if people would be interested in recordings of us doing Floyd stuff. But evidentially they are. Fans were always telling us they want to take something home and watch it and share with friends that couldn’t make it to the shows. We did one last year that was a double DVD that was recorded in Hammersmith in London. The first disc was the show and the second was a documentary on the band, which was really great. This time we released a concert from this year’s tour “Exposed in the Light”. We actually filmed it all ourselves with HD cameras. What we did was set up the cameras in different positions every night, so we ended up with something like 20 different camera angles. Then that was all edited together to make what looks like a huge camera shoot. It has come out absolutely amazing. In between the songs, we have got some great behind-the-scenes footage. It is a nice little package and it has this really great HD quality concert footage with all the different angles. You get to see a lot of the show from various different positions. We are very excited about that.

MG: Tell what we can expect from the 2013 tour “Eclipsed By The Moon”?
CW: It is the 40th anniversary of “Dark Side of the Moon” in 2013, so it is very exciting. 10 years ago, we did the 30th anniversary which was incredibly successful. We are looking this time around to maybe do something different with it. We are not 100% certain just yet how we are going to approach it. Whether we do the whole thing in its entirety or if we mix it up a bit. We are also looking into different things to project on the screen during it and really make it and event. One thing that I can guarantee is that it will be a big celebration of “Dark Side of the Moon”. I think there are a lot of Pink Floyd fans out there that are really on the edge of their seat waiting for this tour. It starts February of next year in the UK. So it is going to be great.

SIGNED Book Giveaway for Gerald Scarfe’s “The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall” [ENDED]

THIS GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED AND WINNERS HAVE BEEN NOTIFIED VIA EMAIL. PLEASE CHECK BACK EACH WEEK FOR NEW GIVEAWAYS!

Gerald Scarfe is a satirical political cartoonist and is known best for working with the band Pink Floyd on two of their albums “The Wall” and “Wish You Were Here”. He also created the animation used in the film “Pink Floyd: The Wall” and worked with Roger Water on his new tour of “The Wall”. Media Mikes got the chance to chat with Gerald about his work and reflect on its impact with fans. Read the interview here!

To accompany our recent interview with Gerald, he was kind enough to send us TWO SIGNED copies of his book “The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall”. If you would like to win one of these great prizes, please leave us a comment below or send us an email and let us know your favorite Pink Floyd song. This giveaway will be open until Friday October 26th at Noon, Eastern Time, open to readers WORLDWIDE. Only one entry per person, per household; all other entries will be considered invalid. Once the giveaway ends, Media Mikes will randomly pick out winners and alert the winners via email.

Gerald Scarfe talks about working with Pink Floyd on “The Wall” and “Wish You Were Here”

Gerald Scarfe is a satirical political cartoonist and is known best for working with the band Pink Floyd on two of their albums “The Wall” and “Wish You Were Here”. He also created the animation used in the film “Pink Floyd: The Wall” and worked with Roger Water on his new tour of “The Wall”. Media Mikes got the chance to chat with Gerald about his work and reflect on its impact with fans.

Mike Gencarelli: Tell us about your revisiting the wall with your book “The Making of Pink Floyd: The Wall”?
Gerald Scarfe: What I think think the weird thing about going through the diary of one’s life is that first of all you forget things and misplace the dates. It was like unraveling a piece of memory or putting together a jigsaw puzzle. But overall it was a fantastic experience looking back working on this project, which was some 30 years ago. I really didn’t feel at the time that it was going to be anything really exceptionable. I knew that Pink Floyd were extremely well known at the time. I worked with them for about five years to produce this thing. People have asked me in the past and asked if working on “The Wall” changed my life but for me then it was just another a job that I did. They have said “Well it has definitely changed my life”. So I think it really did strike a nerve in the public at that time. The young of those days are the older generation today and they are still fans and write to me. There is a guy who recently contacted me to tell me that his entire left arm is being tattooed with my illustrations. So it is still relevant today.

MG: Tell us about revisiting “The Wall” after almost 30 years ago with Roger Water’s new tour? What was your involvement?
GS: It was a fantastic experience. Now it is back up and running again. Roger contacted me about two years ago and said he was going to do the show again and would need new material. I re-designed some new things like the puppets and some bits of film here and there. I also did various lettering and writing for the program, which was projected on the wall. What has changed from when we originally did it is that things were not computerized. Where we were using three projectors on the wall back then now there are seven or eight projecting. They can literally pin point an individual brick on the wall using the computer. Even when we first did it I thought it felt like a Roman circus and was just so spectacular.

MG: How do you compare going from working on “Wish You were Here” to “The Wall”?
GS: When they first approached me, they were touring at the time and I did little pieces of animation here and there. I wasn’t really sure what was needed or wanted of me at the time. I was known in Britain and parts of America for being a satirical artist, making fun of society and poking fun at politicians. I think that is why Roger (Waters) and Nick (Mason) needed from me at the time. I didn’t quite get that and I started to make them these surreal images of men tumbling through the stratosphere and crashing through the sky. They were all rather surreal. I think what they were expecting from me was probably something a little more actual about the world itself in a more precise way. I actually started the flowers (from “The Wall”), way back then in the early days of “Wish You Were Here”. The flowers have some much work in them. I think in some places there are about 24 drawings per second in them, in order to most very slowly. Each one of those drawings probably takes 1-2 days and there are thousands of them. It was very labor intensive and expensive also. So that is how it all began. Later when we came to do “The Wall”, we cannibalized some of these pieces for “Wish You Were Here” and used them like the flowers and so forth.

MG: Your animation in “The Wall” was used to portray Waters’ political expression throughout the songs, did you consider that when creating them?
GS: It was Nick that approached me first in the very beginning.Then Roger got more and more involved. Roger came forward bit by bit and I ended up dealing with him primarily. I felt a little awkward at first working with Waters since I felt like I was denying Nick, he is still a very good friend and I had dinner with him just recently. Roger is very insistent and precise. Roger said to me and this is true “When you hire an artist, you don’t interfere with what that artist does or try and push him your way. You get what you get”. So Roger was very happy for me to interpret his lyrics since we were on the same page. I was able to visualize the whole thing for him. He has not only given “The Wall” an audio personality but I’ve given it also a visual personality. We met many times and drank a lot of a special brew of Carlsberg beer, which is very strong, and luckily we have the same dark wit. That developed into a strong relationship that we have today.

MG: Where did you draw inspiration from for the marching hammers, The Judge and the “Empty Spaces” sequence?
GS: First of all my experiences of judges are that the ministry of the law is a tricky business and they always make mistakes, so to me the law was an asshole, so that was that [laughs]. The hammers were suppose to be the forces of repression. What can you think of that is more cruel and relentlessly mindless than a hammer as it smashes down. That is the kind of way I think. When it came to “Empty Spaces”, I believe that was a stream of consciousness. I made a film prior to this where I just rolled from one image to another, which is actually how I ended up meeting Nick and Roger, it was called “A Long Draw Out Trip”, which I made for the BBC. That was really everything about America that I could think of at the time. I had Mickey Mouse, Playboy, Black Power, John Wayne and Frank Sinatra, which were all morphing one into the other. I took that idea when I came to “Empty Spaces”. Interestingly enough, “Empty Spaces” starts with the flowers, which began like we said from “Wish You Were Here”. Then I just kept adding to it all the time. The flowers end up making love and then I thought well what happens when people fall in love, sometimes they hate one another. So then the female ends up devouring the male and flies away. It grew and grew and was unraveling. It was much of a journey for me, adding a page a day to this unrolling adventure.

MG: I’ve read you saw The Wall back in 1980 at Nassau Coliseum, NY, how do you compare “The Wall” from then to today?
GS: It is difficult really since it was in fact a long time ago and one’s memory has blunted. I remember being very excited. I never worked on theater in this size at all. I remember Roger telling me one night, “You know that you are a rock ‘n roll artist now, right?”. I looked and there were thousands of people applauding my flowers and work. I realized that I was pleasing the audience and that was a terrific feeling for me. Being an artist can be a lonely job. You work alone and don’t see the people who are looking at your pictures generally. So to be in an auditorium like that where they are cheering at your work, it is a really great feeling. Over the years, I have grown used to that feeling having done a lot of opera, theatre and my work with Disney on “Hercules”. It is still a thrill though. I went to Madison Square Garden last year to see the show and I had the same kind of thrill still. The guy who wrote to me and told me about him getting the tattoos on his arm said that he was a Gulf War veteran and told me how much my work has helped him through his difficult periods. It is hard for me to imagine that it actually helps people. I guess the music becomes very personal to some people and it stay with them through their life.

MG: Due to the diminishing role of physical packaging due to digital downloads, what do you see for the role of art playing in the world of music in the future?
GS: Well, I don’t see why animation still cannot be used. In my other job, I am the political cartoonist for the London Sunday Times, where I’ve been for like 45 years, I can see a point where newspapers will be phased out. People will be getting the news online, which is much quicker. I personally am not tremendously computer literate but I have people that help me. All of my work is now electronically sent around the world, once it is scanned in. Going back to music, I don’t see why these images cannot be downloaded with the music. It is exactly the same.

SiriusXM’s Town Hall with Roger Waters to launch new Pink Floyd Channel


Tune in to SiriusXM’s Town Hall with Roger Waters LIVE on June 27 at 12pm ET for the launch of SiriusXM’s new Pink Floyd Channel (Sirius channel 142 and XM channel 43). The special will also air on Deep Tracks (channel 27). You’ll hear the founding member and principal songwriter of Pink Floyd sit down for a rare Q&A session with a select group of SiriusXM listeners at the SiriusXM studios in New York City. This exclusive Town Hall event coincides with Waters’ current tour, The Wall, which will visit Yankee Stadium on July 6 and 7.

The special will be moderated by SiriusXM host Jim Ladd and will feature the rock icon answering a variety of questions from the studio audience.

This event is part of SiriusXM’s “Town Hall” series, an intimate gathering with an iconic figure and an audience of SiriusXM listeners. Previous SiriusXM Town Hall specials have featured Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, Gregg Allman, Coldplay, Ringo Starr and the surviving members of Nirvana.

“The Pink Floyd Channel” will be available Wednesday, June 27 through Saturday, July 7 on Sirius channel 142 and XM channel 43. Additionally, “The Pink Floyd Channel” will also be available as a 24/7 channel online on channel 802 and through the SiriusXM Internet Radio App for smartphones and mobile devices beginning Thursday, June 28 for an extended period.

For more information on Roger Waters and The Wall tour, visit www.rogerwaters.com.