Concert Review: Foreigner, Cheap Trick and Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience

Foreigner, Cheap Trick and Jason Bonham’s Led Zeppelin Experience
Starlight Theatre, Kansas City MO
August 15th, 2017

Review By: J.R. Deeter

“KHIT Radio….all the Hits, all the Time!!!” Don’t you just hate it when you attend a concert and the bands give you some of their hit songs, the ones you know from radio airplay growing up. Or from the constant hours you spent listening to the albums and cassettes you bought at Musicland? But instead they also play a bunch of songs you do not know….”Here’s one from our 3rd album”….ummm, yeah….time to hit the bathroom and concession stand. Well, there was none of that for the Foreigner 40th Anniversary tour stop at Kansas City’s Starlight outdoor venue (weather was great – just about perfect). If you got out of your seat at all, you missed out.

The show began with the Jason Bonham Led Zeppelin Experience, appropriately starting with “Rock N Roll,” “Black Dog,” “Over the Hills and Far Away”…straight through for a total of nine of Zeppelin’s biggest hits, wrapping it up with “Whole Lotta Love.” No “Stairway to Heaven” (thank you). I’ve never been a huge Zeppelin fan, but it was entertaining, with lead singer James Dylan holding his own on vocals and of course, Jason Bonham in charge from behind the drum kit.

Up next, in my honest opinion, the best part of the whole evening, Cheap Trick. They took the stage, opening their show as always with “Hello There,” then rocking through classics like “Big Eyes” and “Ain’t That A Shame.” They threw in a couple for the ladies, “If You Want My Love” and “The Flame,” then broke out the BIG HITS including “I Want You To Want Me,” “Dream Police” and “Surrender.” The band wrapped up their set with “Auf Wiedersehen” and “Goodnight.” Robin Zander’s vocals: still got it. Tom Peterson on Bass: doing fine. Rick Nielsen ROCKS and yes, his son Daxx Nielsen is still the drummer. And, yes, I still miss Bun E. Carlos.

40 years is a long time in the world of rock and roll…most bands never see that kind of longevity. Even with a few years of missing from radio, with no new music, if you’ve ever been on top with monster hits your fans will keep those songs alive. Foreigner is just that kind of band. They brought the best of their best for this show, opening with “Double Vision,” “Head Games” and “Cold as Ice.” They kept going and going, mixing power ballads like “Waiting For A Girl Like You” with rockers like “Dirty White Boy,” “Urgent,” and of course, “Jukebox Hero.” They closed the show, assisted on backing vocals by a choir from the local Saint Thomas Aquinas High School, with their biggest hit to date, “I Wanna Know What Love Is” followed 1978’s “Hot Blooded.”

I enjoyed it all…..while Mick Jones is showing his age at 72, his guitar playing is exceptional. Lead vocalist Kelly Hansen, apparently attempting to channel Steven Tyler, can work the crowd well and delivers vocally.

NOTE: Lou Gramm is playing a few shows on the 40th Anniversary tour, but alas, KC was not one.

Athletes to Actor – The 10 Who Did It Best

Article by Adam Walter

There is a long history of athletes turning to acting after their playing days are over. In fact, many of them get a jump start by acting while they’re still in the midst of their careers. Most of them have been forgettable, but some athletes have gone on to become serious actors or at least leave a lasting impression upon the landscape of popular culture. This is the list of the best athletes turned actors.

10. Bob Uecker

Okay, so maybe calling Uecker an athlete is a stretch when you look at his career .200 batting average, but the man did last six seasons in Major League Baseball. He will always most famously be remembered for his hilarious announcing in the Major League movies.

9. Carl Weathers

Weathers is most widely known for portraying Apollo Creed in the Rocky Franchise. Before he became famous for fighting and training Rocky Balboa, Weathers played linebacker for two seasons at San Diego State, 7 games for the Oakland Raiders and a couple years in the CFL.

8. Jim Brown

Brown’s name is often thrown around in the lists of best athletes in history. He is the only man to average over 100 yards per game for his entire NFL career. After his playing days were over, Brown turned to acting. His most famous role was in The Dirty Dozen.

7. Merlin Olsen

Although kids from the 80’s will undoubtedly remember Olsen most from his role as Ingalls’ family friend Jonathan Garvey on “Little House on the Prairie,” he was one of the best defensive tackles in the history of football. He made the Pro Bowl the first 14 years of his 15-year NFL career, which is a Pro Bowl selection streak that is only matched by Bruce Matthews, Tony Gonzalez and Peyton Manning.

6. Johnny Weissmuller

Weissmuller won five gold medals and a bronze for swimming in the 1924 and 1928 Summer Olympics. He then went on to portray Tarzan in 11 films, starting in 1932. Following that, Weissmuller starred in 13 movies as a famous Asian hunter called Jungle Jim.


5. Alex Karras

Karras was a star offensive lineman for the Detroit Lions over 12 seasons in the NFL. He went on to star in many TV shows and movies, most famously as Mongo in Blazing Saddles and George Papadopoulos on “Webster”.

4. Chuck Norris

Most recognizable by Millennials for the Internet memes referencing his legendary feats, Norris was an action star who is most famously known onscreen for fighting Bruce Lee in Way of the Dragon and portraying the title character in “Walker, Texas Ranger.”

3. Burt Reynolds

Reynolds was a star fullback coming out of high school, but he hurt his knee at Florida State in his sophomore year and never fully recovered. He turned to acting and became one of the biggest movie stars of the 1980s in films like Deliverance, Smokey and the Bandit and The Longest Yard.

2. Bruce Lee

The most famous kung fu movie star ever is also considered by many to be the best martial artist of all time. His most famous films were The Big Boss, Way of the Dragon and Enter the Dragon.

1. Arnold Schwarzenegger

A star so big he is instantly recognizable from his first name alone, Arnold is one of the biggest box-office stars in Hollywood history. In films such as Predator, Kindergarten Cop and The Terminator franchise, Schwarzenegger delighted audiences. Before he became an action hero, Schwarzenegger initially gained fame as one of the most successful bodybuilders ever. He won the title of Mr. Olympia seven times.

Media Mikes is proud to welcome Adam Walter. Adam is recently out of college and makes his home in New York City. His love of sports led to he and some friends starting an Internet blog. You can read more of his work at www.usssportsmachine.com. Welcome aboard!

Kansas City Concert Review: Elvis Costello’s “The Juliet Letters”

“The Juliet Letters”
Saturday, January 28, 2017
Lyric Opera of Kansas City

Review By: J.R. Deeter

Our Score: 3.5 out of 5 Stars

As a fan of the music and lyrics of Elvis Costello I have to admit I had never heard of his 1993 release “The Juliet Letters,” a collection of 20 songs for voice and string quartet. I was not sure what to expect from the artist who has written a few of my favorite “pop” tunes through the years, given this performance was certainly not going to fit into the customary mold of his usual offerings.

From the start, this was indeed something different, something not easy to listen to. I kept waiting for the music to gain momentum into what I was used to. I kept waiting for the lyrics to give way to some snappy chorus easy to sing along to, but this was not to be and after my contemplation of the experience, I came away pleased anyway.

The vocalization interpretations of the Lyric Opera of Kansas City Resident Artists of April Martin, soprano; Samantha Gossard, mezzo-soprano; Casey Candebat, tenor and John Viscardi, baritone, were very entertaining. The set was designed with written letters hanging from wire in a crisscross pattern. The artists would remove pages and exchange them from one to another as they lit or extinguished lighting to create an ever changing dramatic atmosphere. The tone and lyrics are dark and brooding. It became clear that these were not to be happy, lovey dovey letters between star crossed lovers, but words of the brokenhearted; Painful, mournful anguished tales of love lost, or missing or refused.

The Fry Street Quartet of the Caine College of Arts at Utah State University provided the music and was the highlight of the evening. The performance of each member as they presented their part of the music really helped to convey the emotions of the selections and left me feeling sad and melancholy, as one should when the desire for love and happiness is not to be.